TPP in Real Life: How a Texas Instruments Semiconductor Designed in New Hampshire Can Travel 13,000 Miles and Power the World

Texas Instruments Inc. (TI) is a Dallas, Texasheadquartered company that designs, manufactures, tests and sells a diverse portfolio of semiconductors and other products used by more than 100,000 of the world’s most innovative companies. TI’s semiconductors in particular are used in products that range from personal electronics and automobiles to industrial automation equipment, medical devices and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

Texas Instruments Wafer Manufacturing Facility in Dallas, Texas. Photo Courtesy: Texas Instruments

TI wafer manufacturing facility in Dallas, Texas. Photo courtesy of TI.

The global supply chain is critical for TI and all U.S. semiconductor companies that, on average, derive more than 80 percent of their total revenue overseas, with Asia representing more than half of that revenue. A semiconductor designed at one of TI’s U.S. facilities and fabricated at U.S. factories may be sent to Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) countries, such as Malaysia, for additional processing. From there, the semiconductor may then be shipped to a product distribution center in Singapore before being sent to the customer, which incorporates it into an end product and ships it anywhere in the world.

As Paula Collins, TI’s vice president of government relations, said on a recent NAM Trade Podcast, “A TI chip that was designed in Manchester, New Hampshire, may travel 13,000 miles around the world, and eventually end up in any country in the world.”

USB Power Switch Found in PC Notebooks, 3D Printing and Other Devices. Photo Courtesy: Texas Instruments

USB power switch found in PC notebooks, 3D printing and other devices. Photo courtesy of TI.

TI operates multiple manufacturing, design and other facilities in nine states across the United States. This includes semiconductor manufacturing facilities in Texas (Dallas area, Sherman and Richardson) and Maine (South Portland) as well as more than a dozen design facilities in states around the country, including Texas (Dallas area, Austin and Sugar Land), New Hampshire (Manchester) and Arizona (Tucson and Phoenix), just to name a few.

According to Ms. Collins, “The TPP will support jobs in the United States and enhance TI’s ability to compete in the rapidly growing Asia-Pacific region by eliminating tariffs on advanced electronics and establishing new rules of the road, including in areas that have not been addressed in previous trade agreements.” Beyond tariff elimination, TPP benefits for TI include the following:

  • A prohibition on forced technology transfers as a condition of market access or investment
  • A requirement that partner countries accept commercial products with encryption without additional disclosure of confidential intellectual property or source code
  • Strong patentability standards and protection of trade secrets
  • Strong counterfeiting enforcement and penalties, which are critical because counterfeiting costs the U.S. semiconductor industry billions of dollars each year
  • A ban on data localization requirements, critical for manufacturers like TI that support customers around the world, as requirements to store data locally would significantly increase the costs of doing business

On the NAM Trade Podcast, Ms. Collins added that “trade is going to happen with us or without us. I would rather have the United States be at the table, helping to protect U.S. values, helping to protect U.S. workers, helping to protect the U.S. environment, to ensure that we are helping to shape globalization, rather than just responding to it.”

Read more “TPP in Real Life” stories here.

Ken Monahan

Ken Monahan

Director for International Trade Policy at National Association of Manufacturers
Ken Monahan is the Director for International Trade Policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), where he works with NAM member companies to develop and advocate the association’s positions and priorities on trade agreement negotiations, ensure enforcement of existing trade agreement commitments, and other issues including the World Trade Organization (WTO), miscellaneous tariff bills, data flows and privacy, conflict minerals, forced localization, and other bilateral country trade matters (e.g., Colombia, South Korea, and the European Union and its member states). Mr. Monahan has on-the-ground experience negotiating trade agreements, having worked at the U.S. Department of Commerce on the WTO Doha Round negotiations, the U.S.-Korea free trade agreement and other international trade matters.
Ken Monahan

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