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WTO

Manufacturers Welcome WTO Solar Panel Decision

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Manufacturers welcome today’s U.S. victory on solar energy with the World Trade Organizations (WTO) rejection of India’s appeal and urge the Indian government to move quickly to dismantle its discriminatory domestic content requirements that have blocked access for U.S. solar cell modules. As each and every previous ruling in this case has shown, India’s domestic content requirements are a clear violation of core WTO rules, and today’s victory will give an important boost to manufacturing in the United States. This decision also demonstrates why the strong rules-based WTO system and trade agreements with binding and strong enforcement rules are critical to open markets and eliminate unfair barriers overseas. The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) congratulates Ambassador Michael Froman and the United States Trade Representative (USTR) for their successful efforts. Read More

NAM, Business Community in Geneva Pushing for “No-Brainer” Environmental Goods Agreement

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As negotiators meet this week in Geneva for the 14th Round of Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) negotiations, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and business representatives from the Coalition for Green Trade are also in attendance urging all sides to make progress on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Ministers’ commitment to conclude a strong agreement that eliminates tariffs on a wide range of environmental goods and technologies by the September G-20 Summit in Hangzhou, China. Read More

Manufacturers Excited by WTO Opportunities in a Post-Doha World

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The acknowledgement by trade ministers at the 10th Ministerial Conference Dec. 19 in Nairobi that many WTO Members want to explore “new architectures” for trade negotiations is a catalyst for countries ready to pursue initiatives that open markets and raise standards to improve economic growth through trade. The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) is ready to advocate for such agreements under the aegis of the WTO.

The successful conclusion of an expanded Information Technology Agreement (ITA) in Nairobi, coupled with ongoing efforts to negotiate an ambitious Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA), lend important credibility to the WTO as a negotiating forum and could spur action on other market-opening and high-standard agreements.
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Greener Goods Trade Depends on TPA

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Much of the focus surrounding Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) has been on the two large regional free trade agreements being negotiated by the United States – the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) with eleven Pacific Rim countries, and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the European Union. And with good reason: Taken together, the countries negotiating these agreements collectively account for more than 60 percent of global GDP, and if done right, TPP and TTIP would help level the playing field for U.S. goods and services, opening up major new commercial opportunities for manufacturers in the U.S. in a number of key export markets. Read More

Global Manufacturing Economic Update – March 13, 2015

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Here is the summary for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update: 

Manufacturers are facing some significant headwinds from sluggish growth abroad and from a U.S. dollar that has strengthened sharply over the past few months. According to the Federal Reserve Board, the trade-weighted U.S. dollar index against major currencies has risen from 75.6968 on July 1 to 91.5660 on March 6, a 21.0 percent increase. Along those lines, the euro has fallen to its lowest levels since January 2003. It peaked in 2014 on May 6 at $1.3924 for each euro. On March 12, it closed at $1.0640 to the euro, with some expectations that it will move to parity soon. It last reached parity in November 2002. Overall, these developments could hurt the ability of manufacturers in the United States to grow exports. (Some recent comments from me in the media on this topic can be found in the Financial Times, The New York Times and The Washington Post.) Read More

U.S. Scores WTO Victory Against Discriminatory Argentine Import Restrictions; Manufacturers Look for Quick Redress

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The World Trade Organization (WTO) Appellate Body issued a decision on January 15 finding Argentina’s import restrictions on U.S. and other imported goods breached the international trade rules that Argentina had adopted in joining the WTO.

Since 2012, Argentina had, through its Declaración Jurada Anticipada de Importación or “DJAI,” and other measures, imposed limits on imports and other trade restrictive measures that have limited the ability of U.S. manufacturers to export and participate successfully in the Argentine market. These measures are estimated to affect billions of dollars of U.S. exports each year. Read More

NAM Partners with Global Business Dialogue to Promote Environmental Goods Agreement

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This morning the NAM and the Global Business Dialogue hosted a discussion about the Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) negotiations underway at the World Trade Organization (WTO). NAM’s Linda Dempsey, Vice President for International Economic Affairs, spoke about the benefits to manufacturing of a broad EGA, mentioning that, “increased trade and global engagement is vital for our manufacturers. With only a 9 percent share of the global $11 trillion market in manufactured goods trade outside our borders, manufacturers can and should be able to expand commercial opportunities.

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Global Manufacturing Economic Update – August 8, 2014

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Here is the summary for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update:

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) predicts that world output will grow 3.4 percent in 2014, down from 3.7 percent in its April forecast. Much of the downward movement stems from weaker-than-expected data from the first quarter. In the United States, for instance, real GDP declined by a disappointing 2.1 percent, and even with a rebound in the second quarter, the economy expanded by just 0.9 percent in the first half. Fortunately, manufacturers are mostly upbeat about the second half, and the IMF predicts 1.7 percent and 3.0 percent growth in the United States for 2014 and 2015, respectively. Europe is anticipated to grow 1.1 percent this year, and the Chinese economy should increase by 7.4 percent. While the emerging markets as a whole have started to see signs of improvement, notable weaknesses still exist in Brazil, Russia and South Africa, to name just a few. Geopolitical risks abound, of course, with crises around the world also negatively impacting activity.

The good news is that global manufacturing activity continues to expand modestly, with the pace little changed in July from June. New orders, production and employment growth slipped a little for the month, but exports picked up. In July, 8 of the top 10 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods had expanding economies, with Brazil and South Korea contracting once again. Among the expanding nations, Canada and China saw accelerating levels of manufacturing demand and production in July, with relatively decent growth seen in both the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. At the same time, manufacturers in the United States have continued to rebound from softness earlier in the year. The Institute for Supply Management’s Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) increased to its highest level since November on strong output and sales growth.

The Chinese economy has begun to stabilize, with manufacturers in China expanding for the second straight month. New orders, exports and production growth all strengthened in July, and we anticipate a pickup in industrial production and fixed-asset investment rates when they are released next week. China’s real GDP has increased slightly, from 7.4 percent at the annual rate in the first quarter to 7.5 percent in the second quarter. Meanwhile, Eurozone manufacturers have now expanded for 13 straight months, but activity has decelerated since January. Confidence measures have weakened, year-over-year inflation remains very low and the unemployment rate stayed elevated (even as it fell to 11.5 percent). Still, the latest industrial production and retail sales have reflected a rebound.

In general, we have seen the U.S. trade deficit narrow over the past couple years as we have become less dependent on foreign sources of energy. In June, the trade deficit was at its smallest level since January, as goods imports declined at a faster pace than goods exports increased. Still, we continue to see relatively slow growth for U.S.-manufactured goods exports, which have increased 1.7 percent year-to-date. Ideally, we will see improvements moving into the second half, as the current pace represents a deceleration from last year’s 2.6 percent rate of growth.

The last month saw important progress in ongoing trade negotiations with Europe and 11 Pacific Rim nations, as well as environmental goods talks in the World Trade Organization (WTO). However, India and others successfully blocked agreement on a global trade facilitation package that would add an estimated $1 trillion to the world economy, potentially setting up a last-ditch effort to revive the deal in September. Responding to rising tensions in the Ukraine, the United States and the European Union (EU) imposed fresh sanctions on Russia in the financial, energy and defense sectors.

With Congress now in recess for the month of August, manufacturers are engaging Senators and Representatives in their states and districts and gearing up for action in the fall on a range of stalled trade measures—including reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank, Trade Promotion Authority, a miscellaneous tariff bill and the Generalized System of Preferences. A House bill that would provide access to federal civil enforcement for trade secrets theft is fast gaining cosponsors, laying the groundwork for a Judiciary Committee markup and possible passage in September. The planned official visit of India’s new Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, to Washington at the end of next month will provide another opportunity to address outstanding trade and investment barriers in that important market.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

manufactured exports growth - aug2014

Global Manufacturing Economic Update – July 11, 2014

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Here is the summary for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update: 

The global economy improved slightly in June, showing some signs of stabilization from weaknesses in prior months. The J.P. Morgan Global Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) increased from 52.1 in May to 52.7 in June, its fastest pace since February. Various measures of activity were mostly higher, including new orders, production and employment. Behind this figure, the data also reflected economic progress in countries such as China, Hong Kong and Japan, each of which shifted from a contraction in May to slight growth in June. As a result, just 2 of the top 10 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods had PMI values below 50 in June, an improvement from the five that registered contracting levels in May. Our largest trading partner’s values, the RBC Canadian Manufacturing PMI, increased from 52.2 to 53.5, reaching its highest point since December.

Europe dominated economic headlines on July 10, with worries about a large Portuguese bank and falling industrial production figures for France (down 1.7 percent), Germany (down 1.8 percent) and Italy (down 1.2 percent). Indeed, European growth has continued to ease, with the Markit European Manufacturing PMI down from 52.2 to 51.8. On the positive side, manufacturing activity has now expanded for 12 straight months, but the economy in the Eurozone remains subpar overall. Real GDP was up just 0.2 percent in the first quarter and is expected to increase around 1 percent in 2014 as a whole. Still, growth varied widely from country to country. France sits on one end of the spectrum, with manufacturing sentiment worsening and falling to a six-month low. Meanwhile, Ireland and Spain experienced multiyear highs for sales growth, and new orders in the United Kingdom expanded rather robustly (up from 59.5 to 61.0).

In the emerging markets, manufacturers in Brazil, Russia, South Korea and Turkey reported contracting levels of activity in June, although Russian production grew for the first time in six months and South Korean exports began to stabilize. Overall, however, manufacturing activity in the emerging markets expanded for the second straight month, spurred higher by better news in some Asian economies. Stronger sales and output resulted in increased manufacturing PMI data for China, India, Indonesia and Taiwan. India also benefited from greater export growth. Next week, we will get new data on Chinese GDP, industrial production, fixed-asset investment and retail sales. Real GDP is expected to pick up slightly, from the 7.4 percent annualized growth rate experienced in the first quarter, with a consensus estimate of around 7.5 percent. While this is a marginal improvement, it also continues to reflect decelerating rates of growth from what was experienced in the past.

Looking at U.S. trade flows, petroleum helped to narrow the U.S. trade deficit in May, with more exports and fewer imports improving the headline figure. This continues a trend seen over the past few years whereby improved energy production in the United States has slightly helped balance the trade picture. Outside of petroleum, the numbers were less favorable. The average monthly deficit so far in 2014 reached $43.65 billion, higher than the $39.70 billion average for all of 2013. In addition, U.S.-manufactured goods exports continue to grow at a disappointing rate, up just 0.5 percent year-to-date versus this time last year using non-seasonally adjusted data. Nonetheless, exports of manufactured goods increased to all five of our largest trading partners through the first five months of this year: Canada, Mexico, China, Japan and Germany. That is an encouraging sign, even if we would like to see faster growth in our international sales overall.

On the policy front, the congressional debate on reauthorization of the Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank continues to move forward, while action on other trade legislation is currently stalled. The World Trade Organization (WTO) officially began environmental goods negotiations, while both the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) continue. The U.S. trading relationship with key partners, including India, China and Russia, continues to be a focus.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

china pmi - jul2014

Global Manufacturing Economic Update – December 13, 2013

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Here is the summary for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update:

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) says that world trade should rebound next year, with growth increasing from its annual pace of 3.7 percent in 2013 to 5.5 percent in 2014. The OECD also forecasts improvements in real GDP for the United States (up from 1.7 percent to 2.9 percent), Europe (up from -0.4 percent to 1.0 percent) and China (up from 7.7 percent to 8.2 percent). Despite such gains, weaknesses persist in emerging markets, and continued political risks could dampen the prospects for better growth.

The prospects for faster global growth should help drive more manufacturing exports in the coming months. The U.S. trade deficit narrowed in October, averaging $40.2 billion through the first 10 months of 2013. That is lower than the $46.4 billion and $44.6 billion deficits in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Yet, growth in U.S.-manufactured goods continues to be frustratingly slow so far this year, up just 1.9 percent year-to-date relative to the same time period last year. Such a sluggish rate will make it hard to meet the President’s goal of doubling exports by 2015, as outlined in the National Export Initiative. Yet, we hope export sales will improve in 2014, especially with stabilizing economies in our largest international markets.

The JPMorgan Global Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) rose to its highest level in more than two years, up from 52.1 in October to 53.2 in November. The key drivers of the increased activity were higher levels for new orders (up from 53.3 to 54.8), exports (up from 51.9 to 52.8) and output (up from 52.9 to 55.3). With the exception of Brazil, all of the other top 10 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods expanded in November. This is an improvement from September, when only six of these economies were growing. The recent progress worldwide has produced notable strides in manufacturing activity for a number of countries, with many reaching PMI levels not seen in several months or even several years. For instance, Japan’s manufacturing PMI reported new orders up at their fastest pace since February 2006. Such data are indicative of the recent gains in the global market, which, while not growing robustly, have made progress of late.

Meanwhile, we are often reminded that we live in an ever-increasing global marketplace, with China’s influence continuing to grow. Last week, we got another example of this. The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication reported that the Chinese yuan has overtaken the euro as the second-most used currency for foreign trade transactions. In October, the yuan was used 8.66 percent of the time in such transactions, up from just 1.89 percent in January 2012. This suggests a substantial increase in the use of the yuan in trade in a very short period of time. The U.S. dollar continues to be the dominant currency used in trade finance, with parties using the dollar 81.08 percent of the time. However, it does illustrate the changing nature of international commerce and the rising stature of China on the trade front.

Much of the policy news recently has focused on trade negotiations and global competitiveness. While the World Trade Organization (WTO) reached a Trade Facilitation Agreement in Bali, other negotiations with the Asia-Pacific, with Europe and separately on information technology will continue into 2014. Preparations are also underway for major legislative activity in 2014, including on Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), reauthorization of the Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank and international tax reform.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers.

global pmi values - dec2013