Tag

Trade

NAM, TPP Coalition Issue State-by-State Calls for Action on TPP

By | Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

Manufacturers need their products sold to more markets, so we can grow more jobs in America. They need their inventions and innovations protected.  TPP will protect and sell American-made goods—and that’s why manufacturers support swift approval of this critical trade agreement. To send that message to Congress, today the NAM and U.S. Coalition for TPP issued the following letters to congressional delegations from 10 states, urging support for TPP. Letters will be distributed to the remaining 40 state delegations in the coming months. Click on the state below to view the letter:

Learn more about the importance of TPP to manufacturers in the U.S. by clicking here.

ITC Report Barely Scratches the Surface of TPP’s Impact

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

However you analyze yesterday’s report released by the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), the fact remains: the global economy requires American leadership and know-how to make it easier to create jobs at home and open up markets abroad. Whether it’s electronics manufacturer Texas Instruments, with multiple facilities employing thousands all over the U.S. and selling its innovative technologies worldwide, or it’s Wisconsin-based Darley with 127 employees, selling fire trucks 100+ to countries including China, Australia, Peru, New Zealand, Vietnam, Singapore, Japan, Nigeria and Brazil– we need free trade agreements like TPP so that manufacturers of all sizes can continue to compete and win.

Manufacturers need their products sold to more markets, so we can grow more jobs in America. They need their inventions and innovations protected.  TPP will protect and sell American-made goods—and that’s why manufacturers support swift approval of this critical trade agreement. Read More

#TruthOnTheTrail: Trade Realities That Campaigns Need to Consider

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

trade-truth-05

Trade continues to be a key topic in the campaigns of both major parties. Unfortunately, the most oft-repeated claims are flat-out wrong and portend a dangerous path of retreat from the strong trade approach that has long been a powerful positive force for American workers, consumers and families. With World Trade Week officially under way, let’s look again at how trade drives the U.S. economy, raises standards of living for American families and grows manufacturing in the United States by dispelling some of the top trade myths.

  1. Free Trade Agreements. If candidates want to take aim at free trade agreements (FTAs), why not go after the hundreds of trade agreements being negotiated without the United States that exclude and disadvantage manufacturers in the United States? U.S. exporters face higher tariffs and barriers than most of the world’s exporters in other countries (ranking 130 out of 132) because the United States has too few, not too many, trade agreements. FTAs are huge market boosters for manufacturing in the United States because they promote fair trade by leveling the playing field. That’s why moving forward on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is so important to manufacturers in the United States.
  1. NAFTA. The criticism of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an enduring but deeply flawed myth. The United States implemented NAFTA in 1994 and then experienced four years of economic growth and the creation of more than 800,000 manufacturing jobs. The recession in the late 1990s had a negative effect on the U.S. economy and jobs, but if anything, NAFTA helped the United States endure that downturn more successfully and has been critical to sustaining and growing the U.S. manufacturing sector, which then faced even stronger challenges from Asian emerging economies.
  1. China. It is easy for candidates to go after China as a major villain in the trade stories they like to tell. China is not easy, but it is not a one-sided picture. Yes, China has grown its manufacturing industry heavily over the past 20 years and is now the largest foreign supplier of manufactured goods to the United States. To reach this level, China engaged in a number of unfair trade practices, government subsidization and discriminatory policies. No debate there. At the same time, China also became the third-largest market for U.S.-manufactured goods, from the seventh-largest purchaser in 2002, the year after China joined the World Trade Organization, with U.S. exports growing more than 350 percent to $89 billion. There’s a long way to go in creating a fairer and more reciprocal U.S.China commercial relationship, but it’s a lot more complicated than the campaign promise of putting on new border taxes on Chinese imports, which we all know would be contrary to U.S. international commitments and would likely result in even stronger retaliation against U.S. exports to China. And just a reminder, the TPP does NOT include China.
  1. Trade Deficits. When we buy more imports than sell exports, that’s considered a trade deficit, which is used by candidates as a negative report card on U.S. trade. However, our economy is much more complicated than simple subtraction. Oftentimes, when the U.S. trade deficit is rising, the U.S. unemployment rate is declining and U.S. manufacturing production is growing. Also, the critics conveniently ignore when we do have a surplus, such as the fact that our country sells more manufactured goods overall to our FTA partners than we purchase from them. U.S. manufacturing output and exports have quadrupled over the past quarter century. Trade, boosted by trade agreements, is helping to fuel our economy.

Trade and manufacturing go hand in hand. The United States manufactures more today than we have in our entire history. Trade and trade agreements have opened the door to new global opportunities for manufacturers big and small throughout America, helping to sustain and grow jobs for millions of Americans. Let’s continue to make sure manufacturers and America can continue to grow.

NAM Podcast: The Opportunities and Realities of Trade

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

As the debate over trade continues, NAM Senior Vice President of Communications Erin Streeter sat down with NAM Senior Vice President of Government Relations and Policy Aric Newhouse and Texas Instruments Vice President of Government Relations Paula Collins to discuss what is at stake for manufacturers and their employees in this latest Shopfloor Podcast.

Trade Shopfloor

International trade is more than facts and figuresit’s a critical component of a manufacturer’s story. For Texas Instruments, and companies like it, international trade impacts every aspect of their business. Collins said,

80% of the purchasing power is outside the United States…Just about every employee that works at [Texas Instruments] is engaged in international trade one way or the other…because what we are producing, we are exporting. And there are just myriads of opportunities out there.

Learn more about the changing dynamics of trade and what it means for manufacturers to stay competitive in the global marketplace by clicking here.

Rigorous, Ongoing and Prompt Trade Enforcement Is a Year-Round Manufacturing Priority

By | Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

While much of the attention of World Trade Month is focused on the growth that manufacturers can achieve with a strong market-opening trade agenda, that agenda only works if it is backed by strong enforcement. Trade enforcement applies not only to the trade agreements negotiated that eliminate foreign barriers but also to the trade rules that seek to ensure trade that is free from unfair government distortions. Read More

What Happens When You Shut the Door to Trade?

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

The fears about an open trading system stoked by candidates and antibusiness NGOs alike are premised on inaccurate assumptions and a misunderstanding of our nation’s history.

From its earliest days, farmers and manufacturers in the United States have relied on international trade to access inputs and final products and sell our products to the world. Our Constitution prohibits export taxes because America’s founders understood something many seem to have forgotten: Read More

Manufacturers Outline “Road Map to Progress” with India

By | Shopfloor Policy, Trade | No Comments

Last week, Indian media reports broke the news that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi would travel to Washington for a bilateral summit with President Barack Obama, marking his fourth trip to the United States in two years. As the two governments prepare for this visit as well as for major bilateral dialogues on economic and commercial issues, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) today issued targeted commercial priorities for the U.S. government to engage with India in 2016priorities that require concrete actions by which manufacturers in the United States will gauge the success of this engagement. Read More

TTIP: Time to Get It Done Right

By | Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

At this week’s 13th Round of Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) talks in New York City, the United States and European Union reiterated their political-level goal to conclude an ambitious agreement by the end of this year. Both sides say they are committed to reaching an agreement on as many issues as possible by this summer, with an eye toward “end-game” negotiations on the most challenging areas by the end of the year.

For our nations manufacturers, it remains absolutely critical that the United States and European Union resist any temptation to conclude an agreement that falls short of the type of ambitious and high-standard outcome envisioned when the talks launched in 2013. During my presentation at yesterday’s TTIP Stakeholder Forum, I underscored the extent to which manufacturers need an ambitious TTIP to boost growth and opportunity during a time of slowing global growth and other challenges around the world. Read More

Hannover Messe: Manufacturers from the United States on the World Stage

By | General, Presidents Blog, Shopfloor Main | No Comments

This week, I had the privilege of attending Hannover Messe, the world’s largest trade show for industrial technology. This was my third year traveling to Germany for the event, along with a delegation of several NAM members, and this year was certainly special as the United States was the official partner country.

With more than 5,000 exhibitors, Hannover is an impressive demonstration of the power and ingenuity of manufacturers worldwide. This year was our chance to take center stage and show the world the innovation revolution that manufacturers are leading in America—and to create opportunities to reach the 95 percent of customers who live outside the United States, which is critical in today’s global economy.

The NAM was proud to be a sponsor and partner with the U.S. Department of Commerce to ensure that manufacturers in the United States had an impressive showing and that manufacturing was a central focus for the many members of the administration, including the president, who attended.

Select USA opening ceremonies

Getting ready to begin: the NAM was proud to sponsor the United States as partner country at the 2016 Hannover Messe.

 

The show officially kicked off at the Sunday afternoon opening ceremonies. President Barack Obama became the first president to attend the event, and he joined German Chancellor Angela Merkel to welcome the world to the 69th Hannover Messe. The two world leaders not only shared a stage for their remarks; they also shared a united cause—to strengthen manufacturing.

President Obama talks with Chancellor Merkel and business leaders. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Obama talks with Chancellor Merkel and business leaders. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Following the opening ceremonies, I joined President Obama and Chancellor Merkel at the Schloss Herrenhausen for an engaging discussion with global business leaders centered on promoting robust economic growth and a joint commitment to expanding trade opportunities.

With President Obama and members of his administration on the ground for the trade show, the trip was also a chance to advance many of manufacturers’ top priorities. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker is one of the strongest advocates for manufacturers in America, and I am proud that we were able to work so closely with her and her great team.

***

At the top of the list of priorities for this trip was the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which would join the United States and the European Union (EU) in the largest economic and trade partnership. We were able to discuss TTIP multiple times with U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Mike Froman and Deputy USTR Michael Punke and brought our delegation to meet with EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström, emphasizing the importance of strong and ambitious outcomes, including a strong shared standard, to benefit manufacturers of all sizes on both sides of the Atlantic. (Read more from NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Linda Dempsey here.)

Pro TTIP

Banner just outside of Hannover fair grounds.

A common theme during our conversations with everyone in Hannover, including U.S., German and EU policymakers, manufacturers large and small and our European business advocacy partners, was how best we can win the “war on trade.” In the face of increasing populist rhetoric on the campaign trail in the United States and a vocal protest wave in Europe, we need to work closely together to explain what TTIP is and how it will create new opportunities for manufacturers, improve growth in our communities and benefit our families. Manufacturers must tell our story of the transformative impact that the agreement will have in new ways to cut through the myths propagated by many NGO and activist groups.

Trade is essential to manufacturers’ success, as it allows us to reach the customers living outside our borders—the very customers exploring the modern technology and impressive products on display at Hannover.

***

Monday was a packed day, touring the facilities, exploring the exhibits, talking with U.S. and European officials and meeting with U.S. manufacturers and friends who had also crossed the Atlantic for the event.

Any visitor would come away with a clear sense that modern manufacturing is vastly different from our past. It’s sleek, high-tech and changing at a rapid pace. Even in just three years, I’ve witnessed dramatic advances in the technology on display at Hannover.

I joined U.S. Deputy Secretary of Commerce Bruce Andrews for a live Facebook chat about what we had witnessed, the importance of trade and the promise of modern manufacturing and the Internet of Things.

Talking trade, investment and advanced manufacturing with Dep. Commerce Secretary Andrews.

Talking trade, investment and advanced manufacturing with Secretary Andrews.

At a business summit on the fairgrounds, President Obama and Chancellor Merkel were joined by U.S. and German CEOs and officials, including Secretary Pritzker, to discuss the future of transatlantic economic relations. Unsurprisingly, this was a recurring theme throughout the trip—and for good reason!

***

Tuesday morning, I was grateful for the chance to talk with Siemens employees and customers at their exhibit. Siemens has been a fantastic partner in preparing for Hannover Messe, and it was great to see many of their innovative solutions on display.

As I said in my remarks, “When you look around this impressive venue, there’s no doubt the world is changing—and changing for the better. Manufacturers are leading the way and driving this change every day. But there’s something that doesn’t change. Manufacturers are still improving our world, offering hope and opportunity through the people we employ, the lives we touch and the products we make.”

 

Siemens2

Speaking to Siemens employees and stakeholders at their exhibit about the future of manufacturing.

Before departing, I led a roundtable discussion with Secretary Pritzker on how we win the battle on trade. We were joined by NAM member companies—Liberty Pumps, UL, UPS and Texas Instruments—as well as leading European advocacy groups and German officials. Expanding opportunities to sell our products overseas means winning the battle for jobs in the United States!

U.S. Commerce Secretary Pritzker engages the NAM delegation about how to advance manufacturers' top priorities in the U.S.

Secretary Pritzker (center) engages the NAM delegation about how to advance manufacturers’ top priorities in the United States.

***

As always, I left Hannover energized and proud of our industry. There’s always work to do, and we must continue to take our message to our elected officials so that the right policies are in place for our success. But there should be no doubt: manufacturers continue to lead the world by creating solutions and building the future.

 

 

An Immodest Proposal: European Insistence on “Investor Court” in TTIP Out of Step with International Practice, Out of Line for a Successful Deal

By | Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

U.S. and European government officials, companies and other stakeholders converge on New York this week for the 13th round of negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Manufacturers continue to stress that negotiators should not settle for anything less than the kind of comprehensive, far-reaching agreement that further strengthens the U.S.-EU economic relationship, eliminates barriers to trade and investment and sets high global standards that promote robust investment that drives global growth and higher standards of living. Read More