Tag: retail sales

Monday Economic Report – April 20, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

Manufacturing production increased 0.1 percent in March. This followed three months of weaker data, including declines in both January and February. There have been some significant headwinds hitting the manufacturing sector over the past few months, including a strong U.S. dollar, weakened economic markets abroad, lower crude oil prices, the West Coast ports slowdown and weather. These challenges have slowed activity in the sector since November. The latest Beige Book discussed these headwinds. The year-over-year pace of manufacturing production in March was 2.4 percent, down from 4.5 percent in November. Meanwhile, total industrial production, which includes mining and utilities, fell 0.6 percent in March, declining for the third time in the past four months. As such, the data suggest manufacturers have started the new year on a very soft note despite optimism for better demand and output moving forward. (continue reading…)

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Retail Sales Rebounded Somewhat in March

The Census Bureau said that retail sales rebounded in March after declining in each of the previous 3 months. Retail spending rose 0.9 percent in March, with strong growth in motor vehicle and parts sales (up 2.7 percent) helping to lift the overall figure. Excluding motor vehicle and parts, retail sales were up 0.4 percent, still a modest growth rate. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – March 23, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy has sputtered a bit in the early months of 2015. While it continues to grow modestly, several economic indicators are weaker than we would prefer. For example, manufacturing production decreased by 0.2 percent in February, declining for the third straight month. Many headwinds have combined to bring about this softness in the manufacturing sector, including global economic weakness, a strong U.S. dollar, the West Coast ports slowdown, a cautious consumer and the weather in some parts of the country. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – March 16, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Global news dominated the headlines once again last week. The euro sank lower as the European Central Bank began its quantitative easing program, where it plans to purchase 1 trillion euros in government bonds over the next 18 months in an effort to stimulate faster economic growth. As a result, the euro has depreciated by nearly 25 percent over the past 10 months, down from $1.3924 per one euro on May 6 to a close of $1.0483 on Friday. There is also some expectation that it will move to parity soon, a level last seen in November 2002. (For more information on international developments, see the latest Global Manufacturing Economic Update.) (continue reading…)

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University of Michigan: Consumer Sentiment Declined Unexpectedly Again in March

The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters said that consumer confidence unexpectedly slipped for the second straight month. The Consumer Sentiment Index has dropped from 98.1 in January to a revised 95.4 in February to 91.2 in March, according to preliminary data. The January figure had been the highest level in 11 years. Americans continue to be more positive today than one year ago, with the index measuring 80.0 in March 2014, and as such, the longer-term trend remains positive.

However, these data also suggest that the public remains anxious, mirroring the caution seen in recent retail sales data. The University of Michigan survey indicates some easing in both current and expected measures over the past two months. Final data will be released on March 27.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Retail Sales Fell for the Third Straight Month in February

The Census Bureau said that retail sales slipped for the third straight month in February. Retail spending fell 0.6 percent in February, building on the 0.9 percent and 0.8 percent declines observed in December and January, respectively. Much of the recent decline has stemmed from lower gasoline prices, with gasoline station sales reflecting reduced receipt levels. To illustrate this point, Americans spent $46.3 billion at gasoline stations in February 2014, but that figure has dropped 23.0 percent since then to $35.6 billion in this report. Indeed, retail sales grew 1.7 percent year-over-year, but if you were to exclude gasoline station spending, the year-over-year rate would have been 4.7 percent. This suggests that consumer spending is better than the headline numbers might indicate. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – February 17, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Recently, much of the discussion has been about the strength of the United States relative to many of its trading partners. Indeed, that continues to be the case for the most part, as noted in the latest Global Manufacturing Economic Update. Yet, last week, there was a bit of a shift, with better-than-expected economic growth in Europe and disappointing consumer spending and sentiment in the United States. The data points do not change the underlying trends, with manufacturers continuing to be mostly upbeat about future demand and production. However, it does suggest that economic activity has been softer in some areas than we had hoped as we begin 2015.  (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – January 20, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Financial markets around the world continued to react to the softening global economic environment. In particular, foreign exchange markets were rocked by news that Switzerland would no longer support its cap on the franc, where that currency has been seen as a safe haven, particularly against the euro. Almost immediately, the Swiss franc appreciated sharply against the euro and other currencies. For its part, the euro has continued to depreciate against the U.S. dollar, with one euro selling for $1.1581 on Friday. This was down $1.3927 on March 17, the high point of 2014, representing an appreciation of more than 17 percent for the U.S. dollar against the euro. These developments could hurt the ability of manufacturers in the United States to grow exports. (continue reading…)

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Retail Sales Numbers Were Unexpectedly Soft in December

The Census Bureau said that retail sales decreased 0.9 percent in December, which was much weaker than expected. Gasoline station sales were down 6.5 percent, falling for the sixth time in the past seven months and declining 25.4 percent since July. Of course, gasoline station sales reflect lower prices. The Energy Information Administration reported that the average price of regular conventional gasoline this week is $2.07 per gallon, down from $3.64 a gallon during the week of July 23, 2014.

In addition to gasoline, another area of softness was motor vehicle sales, which declined 0.7 percent in December. Still, American purchases of new automobiles remained a bright spot overall, with year-over-year growth of 8.6 percent. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – December 15, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The biggest domestic economic news story last week was actually a global one: The price of petroleum continued to plummet. Since peaking at $107.95 per barrel on June 20, the price of West Texas Intermediate crude has fallen dramatically, down to $57.49 a barrel on Friday. There are a number of factors at play here, including increased North American energy production, excess supply worldwide, a stronger U.S. dollar and a slowing global economy. It is this latter point that has spooked financial markets, on fear that the weakened global demand for petroleum might be a harbinger of larger challenges. Indeed, as discussed in the most recent Global Manufacturing Economic Update, North America’s economy appears to be a bright spot in an otherwise sluggish international economic climate. (continue reading…)

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