Tag: retail sales

Monday Economic Report – January 20, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Financial markets around the world continued to react to the softening global economic environment. In particular, foreign exchange markets were rocked by news that Switzerland would no longer support its cap on the franc, where that currency has been seen as a safe haven, particularly against the euro. Almost immediately, the Swiss franc appreciated sharply against the euro and other currencies. For its part, the euro has continued to depreciate against the U.S. dollar, with one euro selling for $1.1581 on Friday. This was down $1.3927 on March 17, the high point of 2014, representing an appreciation of more than 17 percent for the U.S. dollar against the euro. These developments could hurt the ability of manufacturers in the United States to grow exports. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Retail Sales Numbers Were Unexpectedly Soft in December

The Census Bureau said that retail sales decreased 0.9 percent in December, which was much weaker than expected. Gasoline station sales were down 6.5 percent, falling for the sixth time in the past seven months and declining 25.4 percent since July. Of course, gasoline station sales reflect lower prices. The Energy Information Administration reported that the average price of regular conventional gasoline this week is $2.07 per gallon, down from $3.64 a gallon during the week of July 23, 2014.

In addition to gasoline, another area of softness was motor vehicle sales, which declined 0.7 percent in December. Still, American purchases of new automobiles remained a bright spot overall, with year-over-year growth of 8.6 percent. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Monday Economic Report – December 15, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The biggest domestic economic news story last week was actually a global one: The price of petroleum continued to plummet. Since peaking at $107.95 per barrel on June 20, the price of West Texas Intermediate crude has fallen dramatically, down to $57.49 a barrel on Friday. There are a number of factors at play here, including increased North American energy production, excess supply worldwide, a stronger U.S. dollar and a slowing global economy. It is this latter point that has spooked financial markets, on fear that the weakened global demand for petroleum might be a harbinger of larger challenges. Indeed, as discussed in the most recent Global Manufacturing Economic Update, North America’s economy appears to be a bright spot in an otherwise sluggish international economic climate. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Holiday Sales Have Gotten Off to a Strong Start

The Census Bureau provided encouraging news about retail sales growth in November. Retail spending was 0.7 percent in November, extending the revised 0.5 percent growth seen in October. This is noteworthy because it will help to erase anxieties about holiday spending seen in prior estimates. On a year-over-year basis, retail spending has increased 5.1 percent in November, a relatively healthy pace, up from 4.5 percent in October. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Monday Economic Report – November 17, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Manufacturers produced $2.085 trillion in value-added in the second quarter, according to new data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. That figure is continued evidence that the manufacturing sector has a significant impact on economic activity, accounting for 12 percent of GDP. Moreover, the sector added 0.81 percentage points to second-quarter real GDP growth, which rebounded by 4.6 percent after weakness in the first quarter. This suggests that manufacturers had an outsized impact on economic growth in the second quarter, with only the professional and business services sector having a larger contribution to real GDP. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Retail Sales Bounced Back in October

The Census Bureau said that retail sales rose 0.3 percent in October, offsetting the 0.3 percent decline in September. This was slightly better than the consensus estimate of 0.2 percent growth for the month. Moreover, gasoline station sales fell 1.5 percent and have declined in four of the past five months. Of course, gasoline prices were largely behind this decrease, with the average price of regular gasoline dropping from $3.64 in late June to less than $2.91 last week. Excluding gasoline, spending would have risen 0.6 percent, suggesting better sales figures in the broader market. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Monday Economic Report – November 3, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

The U.S. economy grew 3.5 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, representing decent growth following the disappointing first half of 2014. Consumer and business spending, which rebounded strongly in the second quarter, extended those gains in the third quarter, albeit with some easing in the pace of growth. Exports were also up strongly for the quarter, and imports were down. Dramatic inventory swings over the past three quarters were also evident, with stockpiles searching for a new normal. After adding 1.47 percentage points to real GDP in the second quarter, slower inventory replenishment subtracted 0.57 percent in the third quarter, making it one of the few negatives in the report. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Retail Sales Were Weaker in September

The Census Bureau said that retail sales declined 0.3 percent in September, suggesting softness in consumer spending as we begin the autumn months. Indeed, spending was down mostly across-the-board, which was disappointing. It was the first decline in retail sales since the weather-induced weakness observed in January. On the positive side, year-over-year growth in retail spending continues to be at fairly decent rates, up 4.3 percent over the past 12 months. This was down from a 5.0 percent pace, however, in August.

Clothing and accessories (down 1.2 percent), building materials (down 1.1 percent), nonstore retailers (down 1.1 percent), gasoline stations (down 0.8 percent) and motor vehicles and parts (down 0.8 percent) were among the sectors with the largest declines in retail spending. A fair share of the decrease for gasoline stations stemmed from lower gasoline prices, with the average price per gallon of regular gasoline dropping from $3.410 for the week of September 1 to $3.304 for the week of September 29. (The average has fallen further to $3.147 a gallon this week.) In addition, motor vehicle sales have continued to be a strength (up 9.5 percent year-over-year) despite the decline in September.

In contrast, electronics and appliances (up 3.4 percent), food services and drinking places (up 0.6 percent), health and personal care (up 0.3 percent) and general merchandise (up 0.2 percent) stores notched retail sales gains in September. The increase in electronics spending was likely spurred by the introduction of new iPhones from Apple.

Overall, retail sales figures suggest that Americans remain quite cautious. Lower gasoline prices should help fuel additional spending in the coming months, with the National Retail Federation forecasting holiday sales growth of 4.1 percent this year. Yet, the fact that we are starting fall with weaker data suggests that consumer sentiment remains anxious. Hopefully, retail spending will pick up in the coming months.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Monday Economic Report – September 15, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The latest NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers found that businesses are generally upbeat about the coming months. Manufacturing respondents expect 4.4 percent growth in sales on average over the next 12 months, the fastest pace of expected growth in new orders since the first quarter of 2012, when the sector was expanding more robustly. Indeed, nearly half of those taking the survey anticipate sales growth of at least 5 percent. Capital investment and hiring trends have also moved in the right direction, with manufacturers planning to increase capital spending and employment by 2.5 percent and 1.9 percent, respectively. The hiring figure represents substantial progress from the lackluster pace of job growth in 2013, which averaged just 0.8 percent. Overall, 87.3 percent said that they were positive in their outlook, the highest reading in two and a half years.

Nonetheless, the more positive attitude needs to be balanced against other issues. First, enthusiasm for expanded new orders and production is often nuanced by anxieties that events might prevent the economy from gaining traction—much as it has time and again in this recovery. Certainly, many of them are disappointed with the slow economic growth in the first half of 2014, even if they remain hopeful about the second half.

Second, manufacturers—like many Americans—continue to be frustrated with Washington. The top business challenges remain rising health insurance costs and an unfavorable business climate, cited by 77.1 percent and 73.1 percent, respectively, in the survey. Along those lines, the NAM released a study showing the disproportionate burden placed on small businesses and manufacturers when complying with federal regulations. Total federal compliance costs in 2012 were estimated to be $2.028 trillion, with an average cost of $19,564 per employee for manufacturers, or twice the level of all businesses.

Beyond these issues, there was encouraging news on the consumer front. Retail sales rose 0.6 percent in August, rebounding from softer increases in the previous three months. Prior to this release, there were worries that a more cautious consumer might derail brighter prospects for growth. This data suggests that the public might be more willing to spend. Retail sales have risen 3.8 percent year-to-date, or 5.0 percent over the past 12 months. Moreover, the consumer also appears to be less hesitant about borrowing, with July consumer credit up 9.7 percent in July. This included a sizable pickup in revolving credit, which includes credit cards. Another positive was the increase in consumer sentiment from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters, ending a lull in that measure throughout 2014 and marking its highest point since July 2013.

This morning, we will get new data on industrial production. Production in the sector jumped one percent in July, and the expectation is for modest gains in manufacturing output in August. It is also anticipated that housing starts and permits will once again exceeding one million annualized units when August figures are released on Thursday. This would suggest that residential construction activity has begun to recover from softness earlier in the year. Beyond those figures, the biggest headlines will come from the Federal Open Market Committee meeting this week, which is not expected to make any major shifts in monetary policy. Quantitative easing should end in October, with the largest focus being uncertainty over when the Federal Reserve will start raising short-term rates. With that said, new consumer and producer price data should reflect the recent easing in inflationary pressures, particularly from lower energy costs.

Other data releases this week include the latest findings on manufacturing activity in the New York and Philadelphia Federal Reserve Banks’ districts and data on home builder confidence, leading indicators and state employment.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

retail sales - sept2014

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


After Cautiousness in July, Retail Sales Pick Up in August

The Census Bureau said that retail sales rose 0.6 percent in August, rebounding from a revised 0.3 percent increase in July. The July figure was originally reported as being unchanged. As such, this is a sign that consumer spending has picked up in August after cautiousness over much of the summer. Still, the longer-term trend for retail sales has been mostly favorable, particularly after strong growth this spring, with 3.8 percent growth since December and a 5.0 percent increase year-over-year.

Healthy gains in spending on motor vehicles helped to lift August retail sales, with auto sales up 1.5 percent. It was the second straight increase in auto purchasing levels after being stagnant in June. Year-to-date, motor vehicle sales have risen by a healthy 7.7 percent, or 8.9 percent over the past 12 months.

Beyond autos, consumer spending also increased at decent levels, up 0.3 percent in August or 4.1 percent year-to-date. Therefore, we have seen modest gains for retail sales in the broader market. Excluding autos, other segments with strong increases in retail spending in August included miscellaneous store retailers (up 2.5 percent), building materials and garden supplies (up 1.4 percent), sporting goods and hobbies (up 0.9 percent), electronics and appliances (up 0.7 percent) and furniture and home furnishings (up 0.7 percent.

In contrast, gasoline stations (down 0.8 percent) and department stores (down 0.4 percent) were two areas with softer spending levels for the month. For gasoline stations, the decline stemmed from reductions in petroleum costs, with the price of West Texas intermediate crude falling from $106.07 per barrel on the last day of July to $98.23 a barrel on the last day of August. (It has fallen further since then, closing at $92.84 on Thursday.)

Overall, retail sales figures were encouraging. With softer spending levels from May to July, there were worries that cautiousness on the part of the consumer could serve to be a downside risk to the economy moving into the second half of the year. This data suggests that Americans might be loosening up a little in terms of their willingness to spend – a good sign perhaps.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


A Manufacturing Blog

  • Categories

  • Connect With Manufacturers

            
  • Blogroll