Tag: personal spending

Monday Economic Report – May 4, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy stagnated in the first quarter, with real GDP growing by just 0.2 percent. This compares to a consensus estimate of 1.1 percent, and it was lower than the 5.0 percent and 2.2 percent growth rates observed in the third and fourth quarters of 2014, respectively. As one might expect from a data point that is just shy of zero, the underlying contributions to growth were mixed. Net exports and government spending were drags on activity in the first quarter, particularly with headwinds from a stronger dollar. Consumer spending on goods and nonresidential fixed investment were also weak, with the latter experiencing sharp declines stemming from the energy market and its supply chain. The bright spots—to the extent that you could call them that—were service-sector spending and a rebound in inventories. (continue reading…)

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Personal Spending Picked Up a Little in March, but Income Growth was Flat

The Bureau of Economic Analysis said that personal spending rose 0.4 percent in March. As such, consumer spending accelerated from February’s 0.2 percent gain and declines in December and January. From a manufacturing perspective, both durable and nondurable goods spending were higher in March, up 1.8 percent and 0.6 percent, respectively. While this is encouraging, particularly if it is the beginning of a rebound, these data also show just how weak consumer spending on goods has been in the first quarter, down 2.2 percent from the fourth quarter. Indeed, the year-over-year pace of personal spending growth has fallen from 4.3 percent in October to 3.0 percent in March. The good news is that this spill represents a modest pace of growth. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – March 9, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

According to the latest NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers, which will be released this morning, business leaders remain mostly confident about activity over the coming months. In fact, 88.5 percent of respondents said they were either somewhat or very positive about the own company’s outlook, and the data are consistent with 3 percent growth in manufacturing production over the next two quarters. Yet, manufacturers who replied to this survey were slightly less upbeat than they were three months ago, when 91.2 percent of respondents were positive in their outlook. Sales, exports and hiring expectations over the next 12 months also decelerated slightly, even as they remain improved from the paces seen a year ago. (continue reading…)

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Personal Spending Fell in January for the Second Straight Month

The Bureau of Economic Analysis said that personal spending decreased by 0.2 percent in January, falling for the second straight month. Durable and nondurable goods spending were also lower in both December and January, and these data suggest that Americans remain cautious in their spending. Of course, there could also be other factors at play, such as lower gasoline prices and heavy snow storms in some regions of the country. Still, on a year-over-year basis, personal spending has increased 3.6 percent, a fairly decent growth rate. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – February 9, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Manufacturers in the United States have added roughly 18,800 workers per month on average over the past 13 months, with an average of 29,000 from October through January. This suggests that the momentum in demand and production in the second half of 2014 has led to an uptick in hiring, which is encouraging. Income growth was also higher, with average weekly earnings up 2.0 percent year-over-year in January. At the same time, the larger economy has also seen strong growth, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by nearly 260,000 per month since the end of 2013. The unemployment rate edged up to 5.7 percent, however, as more Americans re-entered the labor force looking for work. The participation rate rose from 62.7 percent to 62.9 percent. (continue reading…)

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Personal Spending Fell in December

The Bureau of Economic Analysis said that personal spending fell 0.3 percent in December, the first decline in consumer activity since January. In so doing, the year ended as it begun, with softer personal spending. January’s decline was lower, however, because of winter conditions; whereas, the decrease in December appears to be due to lingering caution. Consumer purchases of durable and nondurable goods were off 1.2 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively.

The surprising part of this data is that the decline in personal spending in December came at a time when consumer confidence and personal income growth were both moving higher, but perhaps that signals better spending data in the months ahead. On the positive side, personal spending rose 3.6 percent in 2014, which was decent pace overall. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – December 1, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy grew 3.9 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, according to revised real GDP data released last week. This was better than the 3.5 percent original estimate, and more importantly, it suggests real GDP increased at an annualized 4.2 percent over the past two quarters. The report highlighted a number of positive elements in the economy, including healthy increases in consumer and business spending, goods exports and end-of-fiscal-year government spending. The revision also included better inventory replenishment numbers than originally estimated. (continue reading…)

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Personal Income and Spending Both Rose 0.2 Percent in October

The Bureau of Economic Analysis said that personal spending rose 0.2 percent in October, an improvement from being flat in September. This was slower than the 0.5 percent growth observed in August, however. Indeed, we have seen the year-over-year rate of spending growth fall from 4.2 percent in August to 3.6 percent in October. Still, this is a decent figure, indicating modest growth in consumer purchasing. In October, the increased spending occurred primarily with nondurable goods (up 0.2 percent) and services (up 0.3 percent). Durable goods orders (down 0.2 percent) fell for the second straight month. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – November 3, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

The U.S. economy grew 3.5 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, representing decent growth following the disappointing first half of 2014. Consumer and business spending, which rebounded strongly in the second quarter, extended those gains in the third quarter, albeit with some easing in the pace of growth. Exports were also up strongly for the quarter, and imports were down. Dramatic inventory swings over the past three quarters were also evident, with stockpiles searching for a new normal. After adding 1.47 percentage points to real GDP in the second quarter, slower inventory replenishment subtracted 0.57 percent in the third quarter, making it one of the few negatives in the report. (continue reading…)

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Personal Spending Was Cautious in the Third Quarter, with Declines in September

The Bureau of Economic Analysis said that personal spending declined 0.2 percent in September, somewhat offsetting the 0.5 percent gain observed in August. Third quarter spending on consumer goods and services will go down as the slowest since the second quarter of 2012, up 1.5 percent at the annual rate. This suggests that Americans were more cautious in their spending behavior in the quarter than we might have preferred. In September, durable goods spending fell 2.0 percent in September, essentially counterbalancing the 2.1 percent gain of August. Weaker auto sales were likely behind the September decline. Nondurable goods purchases decreased for the second straight month, down 0.4 percent and 0.3 percent, respectively, in August and September. (continue reading…)

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