Tag: NFIB Small Business Optimism Index

Monday Economic Report – March 16, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Global news dominated the headlines once again last week. The euro sank lower as the European Central Bank began its quantitative easing program, where it plans to purchase 1 trillion euros in government bonds over the next 18 months in an effort to stimulate faster economic growth. As a result, the euro has depreciated by nearly 25 percent over the past 10 months, down from $1.3924 per one euro on May 6 to a close of $1.0483 on Friday. There is also some expectation that it will move to parity soon, a level last seen in November 2002. (For more information on international developments, see the latest Global Manufacturing Economic Update.) (continue reading…)

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NFIB: Mixed News on Small Business Optimism in February

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that optimism rose marginally in February. The Small Business Optimism Index increased from 97.9 in January to 98.0 in February, but remained below the peak observed in December (100.4). The December level was the highest since October 2006. The good news was that the headline index has trended higher, up from 91.4 in February 2014. With that said, there continue to be some lingering anxieties about the economic outlook, with some of the underlying data points easing a bit in February. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – February 17, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Recently, much of the discussion has been about the strength of the United States relative to many of its trading partners. Indeed, that continues to be the case for the most part, as noted in the latest Global Manufacturing Economic Update. Yet, last week, there was a bit of a shift, with better-than-expected economic growth in Europe and disappointing consumer spending and sentiment in the United States. The data points do not change the underlying trends, with manufacturers continuing to be mostly upbeat about future demand and production. However, it does suggest that economic activity has been softer in some areas than we had hoped as we begin 2015.  (continue reading…)

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NFIB: Small Business Optimism Pulls Back Somewhat in January after Peaking in December

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that optimism pulled back somewhat in January after peaking in December. The Small Business Optimism Index declined from 100.4 in December, its highest level since October 2006, to 97.9 in January. Despite the drop in sentiment, the longer-term trend continues to reflect upward movement, with the headline index up 3.8 points over the past 12 months. Still, this report shows that there are lingering anxieties about the economic outlook, even with signs of recent progress. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – January 20, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Financial markets around the world continued to react to the softening global economic environment. In particular, foreign exchange markets were rocked by news that Switzerland would no longer support its cap on the franc, where that currency has been seen as a safe haven, particularly against the euro. Almost immediately, the Swiss franc appreciated sharply against the euro and other currencies. For its part, the euro has continued to depreciate against the U.S. dollar, with one euro selling for $1.1581 on Friday. This was down $1.3927 on March 17, the high point of 2014, representing an appreciation of more than 17 percent for the U.S. dollar against the euro. These developments could hurt the ability of manufacturers in the United States to grow exports. (continue reading…)

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Small Businesses Ended the Year on a High Note

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that optimism soared in December, ending the year on a high note. The Small Business Optimism Index rose from 98.1 in November to 100.4 in December, its highest level since October 2006. Moreover, sentiment has increased significantly since earlier in the year, when the index bottomed out at 91.4 in February. Historically, the small business sector has expanded strongly when the Optimism Index has exceeded 100, so this is an important threshold. As such, the findings were similar to the latest NAM/IndustryWeek survey, which reported 91.2 percent of manufacturers being positive in their outlook in December. (continue reading…)

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NFIB: Small Business Optimism Hit a Pre-Recessionary High in November

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that small business sentiment reached a pre-recessionary high in December. The Small Business Optimism Index rose from 96.1 in October to 98.1 in November, its highest level since February 2007. This is a significant milestone, particularly given the fact that smaller firms have struggled much longer than their larger counterparts to see progress in terms of activity and outlook. Along those lines, the index remains below 100, a level that would indicate strong growth in the sector. Still, this latest data suggests movement in the right direction. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – November 17, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Manufacturers produced $2.085 trillion in value-added in the second quarter, according to new data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. That figure is continued evidence that the manufacturing sector has a significant impact on economic activity, accounting for 12 percent of GDP. Moreover, the sector added 0.81 percentage points to second-quarter real GDP growth, which rebounded by 4.6 percent after weakness in the first quarter. This suggests that manufacturers had an outsized impact on economic growth in the second quarter, with only the professional and business services sector having a larger contribution to real GDP. (continue reading…)

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NFIB: Small Business Owners More Optimistic, with Lingering Concerns

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that its Small Business Optimism Index rose from 95.3 in September to 96.1 in October, rebounding back to where it was in August. Small business leaders have become more confident as the year has evolved, with the index moving higher after bottoming out at 91.4 in February. Since the first quarter, the Optimism Index has averaged 95.7. At the same time, small business owners remain somewhat anxious, with the index remaining below the key threshold of 100, the level that would indicate strong growth for the sector. The index has now been below 100 since October 2006. (continue reading…)

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NFIB: Small Business Optimism Edged a Little Lower in September

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) said that small business sentiment edged lower in September. The Small Business Optimism Index dropped from 96.1 in August to 95.3 in September. Still, small business owners’ sentiment has largely improved after waning in the first quarter of 2014, when the index bottomed out at 91.4 in February. Nonetheless, after peaking at 96.6 in May (its highest level since September 2007), the index has eased somewhat. This suggests that small firms continue to have anxieties about economic growth despite recent progress. Moreover, the index remains below 100 – a level that would indicate health in the small business sector.

Indeed, many of the underlying data points were softer in September. For instance, the net percentage of respondents expecting sales to be higher in the next three months has fallen from 15 percent in May to 5 percent in September. Along those lines, the net percentage planning to hire more workers in the next three months has declined from 13 percent in July (a seven-year high) to 9 percent in September. In addition, capital spending plans over the next three to six months also dropped slightly, down from 27 percent in August to 22 percent in September.

Interestingly, the percentage of small business owners saying that the next three months were a “good time to expand” improved, up from 9 percent in August to 13 percent in September (its highest level since December 2007, the first month of the recession). As such, these data definitely have a nuanced perspective, showing both improvements in the economy and persistent challenges. Economic worries and the political climate were the main reasons noted for those suggesting that it was not a good time for expansion. Regulations were the “single most important problem,” cited by 22 percent of respondents. This was followed by taxes (21 percent) and poor sales (14 percent).

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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