Tag: new orders

Richmond Fed: Manufacturing Activity Expanded at Fastest Pace in Three Years

The Richmond Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity expanded at its fastest pace since March 2011 in August. The composite index of general business conditions rose from 7 in July to 12 in August, marking the fifth consecutive monthly expansion after winter-related contractions in both February and March. Indeed, much like other regional surveys, these data show an uptick in demand and production for manufacturers this summer, with a mostly upbeat assessment for the coming months.

Looking specifically at current activity, manufacturing leaders in the Richmond Fed district noted increased paces for many of the key measures. This included new orders (up from 5 to 13), shipments (up from 3 to 10), capacity utilization (up from 4 to 17) and the average workweek (up from 3 to 8). The index for employment (down from 13 to 11) edged slightly lower, but it still indicated decent growth in hiring and improvement from earlier this year. (Hiring growth was flat as recently as February.)

Enhanced perceptions about the current economic environment also carried through to better expectations about the future. The forward-looking indices for manufacturing activity were mostly higher, and each suggested relative strength over the next six months. For instance, the expected new orders variable rose from 34 to 47, its highest point since December 2010. Manufacturers also planned to expand employment (down from 19 to 18) and invest in more capital (up from 19 to 27), even though the former’s pace eased marginally for the month.

Inflationary pressures decelerated somewhat in August after increasing in July.  Manufacturers in the region said that prices paid for raw materials grew 1.39 percent at the annual rate in August, down from 1.99 percent in July. Yet, looking ahead six months, respondents expect input costs to increase an annualized 2.05 percent, up from 1.89 percent the month before. This suggests that businesses anticipate modest gains in input prices over the course of the second half of 2014, mostly in-line with Federal Reserve projections.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Manufacturers in Texas Continue to Grow, but at a Somewhat Slower Pace in August

The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas said that manufacturing activity continued to grow, but at a slower pace in August. The composite index of general business activity declined somewhat from 12.7 in July to 7.1 in August. It was the 15th consecutive month of expanding levels of activity; however, manufacturers reported a near-stagnant pace in February. As such, it suggests that manufacturing sentiment has rebounded since weather and other factors negatively impacted activity earlier in the year.

Nonetheless, with the composite index lower, many of the key subcomponents were less positive in August than in July. This included new orders (down from 13.0 to 2.2), production (down from 19.1 to 6.8), shipments (down from 22.8 to 6.4), hours worked (down from 6.3 to 2.9) and capital expenditures (down from 13.3 to 6.6). Hiring (down from 11.4 to 11.1) was only slightly lower, but still registering decent growth overall.

The declines in many of these indicators could simply be the result of very strong growth over the past few months, with August’s indices mostly sustaining past gains before moving forward. If that is the case, these latest data could reflect a “breather” before continued expansion in the months ahead.

In fact, manufacturers in the Dallas Fed region remain mostly positive about the next six months. The forward-looking measure of one’s company outlook rose from 24.4 in July to 30.1 in August, and several of the underlying data points also moved higher for the month. Over half of the survey respondents anticipate increased sales, production and shipments in the future, with nearly one-third planning new hires and over one-quarter expecting to increase their capital spending. The one negative remains elevated pricing pressures, with 45.5 percent of those taking the survey seeing higher input costs over the next six months versus just 1.9 predicted lower costs.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Philly Fed: Manufacturers Continue to See Health Gains in August

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia reported healthy gains in manufacturing activity in August, with the fastest pace since March 2011. The Business Outlook Survey’s composite index of general business activity increased from 23.9 in July to 28.0 in August. This represents significant progress from earlier in the year, when activity contracted briefly in February. It was the fifth straight month with the headline index being in double digits, averaging 20.3 from April to August. This would indicate more than just a rebound; it would suggest relatively strong growth overall.

The various sub-components of the index also reflect a continued expansion in the manufacturing sector. With that said, they also suggest that July’s strengths were a bit of an outlier, with many of the key measures pulling back in August while still reflecting solid gains. For instance, the paces for new orders (down from 34.2 to 14.7) and shipments (down from 34.2 to 16.5) both eased; yet, nearly one-third of the survey respondents said that each increased for the month, with roughly half suggesting that they stayed the same.

The employment data were mixed, but still positive. Hiring growth (down from 12.2 to 9.1) decelerated a bit, but one-quarter of those taking the survey reported additional hires. At the same time, the average workweek (up from 12.5 to 13.3) widened somewhat, with 21.2 percent of respondents citing a longer workweek in August.

Looking ahead six months, manufacturers in the Philly Fed district were overwhelmingly upbeat. The future-oriented composite index jumped from 52.0 to 58.1. Moreover, 56.1 percent of survey-takers said that they expect their sales to increase in the coming months, with just 2.6 percent predicted declines. Likewise, over 60 percent predict increased shipments, nearly one-third plan to hire additional workers, and over one-quarter intend to increase capital expenditures. Still, pricing pressures remain a worry. In fact, 40.9 percent of manufacturers in the region anticipate increased raw material costs, with 2.7 percent seeing reduced input prices.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Growth in Chinese and European Manufacturing Activity Slowed in August, While U.S. Was Up Sharply

Given the contraction seen in the Eurozone economy in the second quarter, analysts were eagerly anticipating the preliminary Markit Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) data released this morning. Indeed, the HSBC Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI decelerated from 51.8 in July to 50.8 in August, suggesting that growth in manufacturing activity on the continent has slowed to a crawl. Germany (down from 52.4 to 52.0) eased slightly, but with output falling to its slowest pace since June 2013. French manufacturers (down from 47.8 to 46.5) continue to struggle, with its Flash Manufacturing PMI contracting for the fourth straight month and new orders declining at their quickest pace since in 16 months.

For the Eurozone as a whole, manufacturing activity was slower across-the-board. New orders (down from 52.1 to 51.0), output (down from 52.7 to 50.9), exports (down from 52.6 to 52.1) and employment (down from 49.9 to 49.1) were all lower in August, with the latter contracting for the second consecutive month. Production growth was at its weakest point since Europe emerged from its deep recession 13 months ago. In essence, the good news was that European manufacturing activity did not contract in August, but it is clear that demand and output are moving in the wrong direction. These data will continue to be fodder for those looking for economic stimulus in the months ahead.

Meanwhile, the HSBC Flash China Manufacturing PMI was also much softer for the month, down from 51.7 in July to 50.3 in August. As such, manufacturing expanded for the third straight month, but only barely so. New orders (down from 53.3 to 51.3), output (down from 52.8 to 51.3) and export sales (down from 52.6 to 51.4) downshifted from a modest pace to slower growth, and employment (down from 49.4 to 48.2) deteriorated further. In fact, hiring has been negative in 16 of the past 17 months. While China has begun to stabilize its economy after weaknesses earlier in the year, these data show that there remains room for improvement.

Japan’s economy contracted in the second quarter, falling 1.7 percent in the second quarter or 6.8 percent year-over-year. Yet, the Markit/JMMA Flash Japan Manufacturing PMI (up from 50.5 to 52.4) seem to indicate that manufacturers are in a better mood, with a pickup seen in demand and output. This was the fastest pace since March, or before the imposition of a new tax in April that sent the economy lower. The underlying data were mostly higher, including sales (up from 51.2 to 54.4), production (up from 49.8 to 53.2), exports (up from 50.8 to 53.0) and hiring (up from 50.2 to 51.1).

Closer to home, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing PMI was up sharply, up from 55.8 to 58.0. This was the highest level for manufacturing activity in the U.S. since April 2010. Both new orders (up from 59.5 to 60.8) and output (up from 59.7 to 60.2) were above 60, suggesting strong growth and closely mirroring similar data from the Institute for Supply Management (ISM). New export orders (up from 50.3 to 54.4) and employment (up from 51.2 to 54.6) were both higher, as well, with each recording modest expansions. Overall, these data were quite positive, indicating that the recent rebound in manufacturing activity in the U.S. (after softness in the early months of 2014) has begun to take hold.

Flash data give us an advance estimate of manufacturing activity incorporating “approximately 85% of the usual monthly survey replies,” with the final PMI data for the month released in early September.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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NY Fed: Manufacturers in its District Have Expanded Strongly for Six Straight Months

The Empire State Manufacturing Survey from the New York Federal Reserve Bank said that businesses expanded strongly for the sixth straight month in August. Yet, while growth rates remain at decent levels, the pace of expansion eased somewhat for the month. The composite index of general business conditions declined from 25.6 in July, which was a four-year high, to 14.7 in August. Given the loftiness of July’s figure, it should probably not be much of a surprise that the index came back down to earth. The good news was that much of July’s increases were sustained, with 31.4 percent saying that conditions were better and 51.9 percent suggesting that they remained the same in August.

The underlying data were mixed. On the positive side, the growth rate for shipments (up from 23.6 to 24.6) and the average employee workweek (up from 2.3 to 8.0) both picked up, reflecting increased activity levels. At the same time, new orders (down from 18.8 to 14.1) and hiring (down from 17.1 to 13.6) decelerated slightly, even as they remained at decent growth levels. Pricing pressures remained elevated (up from 25.0 to 27.3), with nearly 30 percent of survey respondents suggesting that input costs were higher in August.

Meanwhile, manufacturers in the New York Fed’s district were significantly more optimistic about the next six months. The forward-looking composite index jumped from 28.5 to 46.8, its highest level since January 2012. Roughly 60 percent of those taking the survey said that they anticipate higher sales and output levels in the months ahead, with approximately 30 percent planning to hire more workers and invest in additional capital expenditures. Still, the average workweek is predicted to be unchanged six months from now, and 46.6 percent feel that raw material prices should increase.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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ISM: Healthy Expansion of Manufacturing Activity in July

The Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI) was up strongly in July, building on the healthy gains seen in June. The headline PMI figure rose from 55.3 in June to 57.1 in July, its highest level since November. After declining sharply in January, sentiment has gradually moved higher each month, with the sector rebounding from winter-related disruptions and slow growth in the first quarter of this year. These findings are largely consistent with other indicators showing manufacturers cautiously optimistic about the next six months.

Production, in particular, appears to have recovered back to the stronger expansionary levels seen in the second half of last year. The index for production increased from 60.0 to 61.2, and it was the third straight month with the measure at 60 or greater. Note that output and sales growth both exceeded 60 for five consecutive months in 2013 (August to December) before that streak ended with weather factors in January. The pace of other components were also higher in July, including new orders (up from 58.9 to 63.4), supplier deliveries (up from 51.9 to 54.1) and employment (up from 52.8 to 58.2). The latter figure hopefully indicates positive news on hiring moving forward.

The sample comments echo the positive news seen in the data, but they also hint of possible weaknesses ahead. A transportation executive said, “Business is still very good and we are very optimistic for the rest of the year.” Yet, others are more restrained in their sales outlook, and world events are noted as possible risks to growth. For instance, a chemical manufacturer added, “Geopolitics still present a considerable risk as well as the European market.” Beyond these points, wage pressures are noted, with a petroleum and coal products respondent citing the need for salary increases “due to market competition and shortages in certain specialty skills.”

Along these lines, the ISM data also show both continued pricing pressures and an easing in export sales growth. The index for raw material costs edged higher (up from 58.0 to 59.5), with this indicator averaging 59.1 through the first seven months of 2014. That indicates an acceleration in input costs over the average of 53.8 seen for all of 2013, and it mirrors other inflation data. Regarding trade, the growth rates for exports (down from 54.5 to 53.0) and imports (down from 57.0 to 52.0) were both lower, and we have seen weaker international sales growth year-to-date in other data, as well.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Manufacturers in Texas Note Accelerated Activity in July

The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas said that manufacturing activity accelerated in July, continuing to rebound from softer levels earlier in the year. The composite index of general business activity rose from 11.4 in June to 12.7 in July. It was the 14th consecutive month of expanding levels of activity; however, manufacturers reported a near-stagnant pace in February. In July, the underlying data were mostly higher across-the-board, including the pace of growth for new orders (up from 6.5 to 13.0), production (up from 15.5 to 19.1), shipments (up from 10.3 to 22.8), capacity utilization (up from 9.2 to 18.0) and capital expenditures (up from 12.7 to 13.3).

With that said, employment growth (down from 13.1 to 11.4) eased slightly, one of the few areas that decelerated in the month. Still, hiring has generally improved from where it was two months ago, with the index up from 2.9 in May. Moreover, one-quarter of respondents to the Dallas Fed survey said that they had added workers in July, with just 13.6 percent suggesting that employment was declining for their company. In addition, the average number of hours worked (up from 4.7 to 6.3) increased somewhat.

Along those lines, a fabricated metal manufacturer noted difficulties in attracting and retaining workers in the sample comments. They wrote, “Skilled employee turnover is getting out of control. There are too many employers chasing too few skilled workers.” Other commenters spoke about the pickup in demand seen in July, with one computer and electronics product respondent adding, “The second quarter was a sold quarter from start to finish….”

Looking ahead six months, Texas manufacturers remain positive about future levels of activity. At least 45 percent of those taking the survey expect sales, production, and shipments to increase over the coming months, with just single-digit percentages anticipating declines. Beyond that, 31.5 percent plan to bring on new workers, and one-quarter are expecting to increase their capital expenditures. The one downside would be the forecast of higher raw material costs moving forward, with a pickup in pricing pressures. In all, 40.7 percent predict increased producer prices in the coming months, with just 6.5 percent expecting declines.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Kansas City Fed: Manufacturing Activity Expanded for the Seventh Straight Month in July

The Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity has expanded every month so far in 2014, picking up slightly in July from June. The composite index of general business conditions rose from 6 in June to 9 in July. The pace of growth accelerated in many of the key indicators, including new orders (up from 8 to 12), production (up from 2 to 11), shipments (up from 2 to 14) and employment (up from 1 to 8). One-third of survey respondents said that their production had increased in the month.

There were two negatives in the report, as well. The average workweek (down from 7 to -3) shifted into its first contraction in six months. The percentage of those taking the survey who noted a reduced workweek increased from 12 percent in June to 17 percent in July, enough to tip the diffusion index. In addition, new export orders (up from -11 to -6) continued to fall, albeit at a slower pace of decline for the month. This measure has been in contraction territory in 8 of the past 12 months, indicating weakness on the trade front in the Kansas City Fed’s district.

Nonetheless, there continue to be encouraging signs for the months ahead. The forward-looking composite index increased from 12 to 15, with relatively strong growth anticipated over the next six months. Manufacturers in the region expect higher new orders (up from 14 to 24), production (up from 17 to 23), shipments (up from 20 to 28), employment (up from 14 to 23) and capital expenditures (up from 23 to 25) at rather healthy rates of growth. In fact, over 40 percent predict increased sales, output and shipments, with more than one-third seeing additional hiring and capital spending. Yet, the sample comments also suggest frustrations with attracting qualified workers. Exports are predicted to grow just modestly (unchanged at 6).

Respondents expect pricing pressures to remain elevated, with nearly half of those taking the survey saying that raw material prices should increase over the next six months. Still, 24 percent felt that input costs for them might fall, and the diffusion index for this measure (down from 49 to 46) eased slightly in July.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Continued Progress in China and the U.S., with Europe and Japan Growing More Modestly

The HSBC Flash China Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) expanded for the second straight month in July, rebounding from softness from January through May. The headline index rose from 50.7 in June to 52.0 in July, its highest level since March 2011. The underlying data were mostly higher, including new orders (up from 51.8 to 53.7), output (up from 51.8 to 52.8) and exports (up from 50.6 to 52.7). The sales pace was the fastest since January 2011, and each of these measures are a sign that recent stimulative actions taken by the Chinese government have had a positive impact. Some downsides in the PMI survey contracting hiring rates for the 16th consecutive month (up from 48.7 to 49.5) and slightly accelerated raw material prices (up from 50.8 to 52.9).

Meanwhile, Japanese manufacturing activity also expanded for the second straight month, but it eased slightly in July. The Markit/JMMA Flash Japan Manufacturing PMI declined from 51.5 to 50.8. The recent uptick in activity has materialized as the Japanese economy has recovered from an increased in taxes that went into effect on April 1st. Still, manufacturers in the country cannot cheer yet, as output growth came to a halt in July (down from 51.8 to 50.0, or neutral). Other indicators were mixed. Export sales (up from 49.0 to 51.6) and employment (up from 49.8 to 50.8) both shifted to positive growth, but the pace of new orders decelerated somewhat (down from 52.0 to 51.1).

In other news, the Markit Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI edged marginally higher, up from 51.8 to 51.9. The Flash Eurozone PMI Composite PMI was up more strongly, increasing from 52.8 to 54.0, suggesting healthier growth in the service sector. For manufacturers, the data suggest slightly faster growth in production (up from 52.8 to 53.0) and exports (up from 52.4 to 52.7), but the pace of growth for new orders (51.9) and employment (50.3) were unchanged.

Overall, these figures provide a limited degree of encouragement for the manufacturing sector in Europe, which has worried of late about slow economic and income growth. It is also still clear that the data vary on country-by-country basis, with German manufacturing activity (up from 52.0 to 52.9) accelerating in July but with French manufacturers noting yet another deterioration in sales and output. Indeed, the French economy remains in a rut, with manufacturing activity positive in just three months since January 2013.

Closer to home, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing PMI decreased from 57.3 to 56.3. Despite the slight easing in July, manufacturing activity continues to grow at relatively decent rates. Through the first seven months of 2014, the top-line index has averaged 55.9, stronger than the 53.5 average noted for 2013 as a whole. The July data show both new orders (down from 61.7 to 59.8) and output (down from 61.0 to 60.4) growing at a healthy paces, albeit with some deceleration for the month. Yet, hiring growth remains more modest (down from 53.8 to 52.1) and export sales (down from 50.9 to 50.6) were just barely growing, suggesting that there remains room for improvement.

Flash data give us an advance estimate of manufacturing activity incorporating “approximately 85% of the usual monthly survey replies,” with the final PMI data for the month released on August 1.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Richmond Fed: Manufacturing Activity Expanding at a Modest Pace

The Richmond Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity grew at a modest pace, expanding for the fourth straight month. The composite index of general business conditions edged slightly higher, up from 4 in June to 7 in July. Note that historical data in the Richmond Fed survey were revised in this edition to reflect new seasonal adjustments.

Despite the improved top-line figure, the underlying data were largely mixed. The biggest positive was hiring, with the employment index up from 4 to 13. This was the fastest pace of hiring growth since December, which was encouraging. Wage (up from 12 to 16) and shipments (up from 2 to 3) were also higher. Yet, new orders (5) expanded at the same pace, and both capacity utilization (down from 7 to 4) and the average workweek (down from 5 to 3) decelerated somewhat for the month.

Still, manufacturers in the Richmond Fed’s district were mostly upbeat about the next six months, with forward-looking measures increasing in July for many indicators. For instance, new orders (up from 27 to 34), shipments (up from 24 to 36), capacity utilization (up from 18 to 29), employment (up from 12 to 19) and capital expenditures (up from 18 to 19) were all higher, with each suggesting relatively healthy paces of growth.

Inflationary pressures have picked up a bit for the month, but remain mostly in-check. Manufacturers in the region said that prices paid for raw materials grew 1.99 percent at the annual rate in July, up from 1.47 percent in June. Looking ahead six months, respondents expect input costs to increase an annualized 1.89 percent, up only marginally from 1.84 percent the month before.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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