Tag: new orders

Kansas City Fed Reported Increased Manufacturing Activity in November

The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City said that manufacturing activity picked up somewhat in its district in November. The composite index rose from 4 in October to 7 in November, its highest level in four months. Along those lines, the pace of production (up from 3 to 9), shipments (up from zero to 7) and employment (up from 6 to 9) improved for the month. In addition, export sales (up from -9 to 8) were positive for the first time since April. Yet, growth remains far from robust, with new orders (down from 2 to 1) decelerating for the fourth consecutive month and just barely above neutral. (continue reading…)

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Philly Fed Manufacturers Were Very Positive about Activity in November

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said that manufacturing activity expanded very strongly in November, with its composite index measuring an off-the-chart 40.8 for the month. This was up from 20.7 in October, and you would have to go back two decades to find a higher figure (December 1993’s 41.2 reading). In fact, 49.2 percent of respondents to the Manufacturing Business Outlook Survey said that conditions had improved in November, up from 34.2 percent who said that same thing in October. Along those lines, the Philly Fed survey has registered above average index figures since the first quarter, averaging 23.0 from April to November. That suggests that manufacturers in the district are currently very positive about their businesses. (continue reading…)

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Markit: Chinese and European Economies Stalled in November

The HSBC Flash China Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) fell to neutral (50) in November, down from 50.4 in October. This was the weakest reading since Chinese respondents noted contracting levels of activity from January through May. Indeed, output contracted once again (down from 50.7 to 49.5) for the first time since May, which was not a good sign. Hiring (down from 48.9 to 48.4) was also negative for the 13th straight month. On the positive side, new orders (up from 51.2 to 51.4) edged slightly higher, and exports (down from 51.7 to 50.5) continued to expand, albeit at a much slower pace. (continue reading…)

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NY Fed: Manufacturing Activity Picked Up Again in November

The Empire State Manufacturing Survey reported a pickup in activity again in November after slowing somewhat in October. The New York Federal Reserve Bank’s composite index of general business conditions rose from 6.2 in October to 10.2 in November. While this figure reflects continued expansion in the sector, it is perhaps notable that the headline figure had averaged 21.2 over the five months of May through September. As such, growth for manufacturers in the New York Fed district has been more modest in the fourth quarter than it was mid-year. (continue reading…)

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ISM: Strong Gains in the Manufacturing Sector in October

The Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI) grew strongly in October, rebounding after a disappointing headline figure in September. The main index rose from 56.6 in September to 59.0 in October, back to where it had been in August. As such, the August and October readings were both the highest levels since March 2011, suggesting healthy gains in the sector as we move into the fourth quarter. (continue reading…)

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Richmond Fed: Manufacturing Activity Continued to Expand at Fastest Pace in Nearly 4 Years

The Richmond Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity continued to expand at its fastest pace since December 2010. The composite index of general business conditions rose from 14 in September to 20 in October. It was the seventh consecutive monthly expansion since the winter-related contractions in both February and March. Indeed, much like other regional surveys, these data show an uptick in demand and production for manufacturers recently, with a mostly upbeat assessment for the coming months.

Looking specifically at current activity, manufacturing leaders in the Richmond Fed district noted sharply higher paces for new orders (up from 14 to 22) and shipments (up from 11 to 23). (continue reading…)

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Dallas Fed: Manufacturing Outlook Picked Up Somewhat in October

The Dallas Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturers continued to expand in October, with the pace of growth in production easing ever-so-slightly. The composite index of general business conditions edged slightly lower, down from 10.8 in September to 10.5 in October. It has averaged 10.3 over the past seven months, which was progress from the 0.3 index reading in February. (continue reading…)

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Somewhat Better Manufacturing Data in China and Europe for October, But Weaknesses Persist

The HSBC Flash China PMI rose to its highest level in three months, up from 50.2 in September to 50.4 in October. It was the fifth consecutive monthly expansion in manufacturing activity in China, an improvement from the contracting activity levels experienced in the first five months of 2014. Yet, despite the better headline figure, many of the underlying data points reflect some easing in growth rates for the month, including new orders (down from 51.5 to 51.4), exports (down from 54.5 to 52.8) and output (down from 51.3 to 50.7). Hiring continued to decline but at a slower rate (up from 47.5 to 48.6).

As such, Chinese manufacturers are expanding but not by as much as we might prefer. This finding is consistent with the deceleration in other Chinese data, including real GDP, which slowed from 7.5 percent year-over-year growth in the second quarter to 7.3 percent in the third quarter. Fixed real investment (down from 16.5 percent year-over-year in August to 16.1 percent in September) and retail sales (down from 11.9 percent year-over-year to 11.6 percent) also declined. On the positive side, industrial production picked up, increasing from the year-over-year rate of 6.9 percent in August to 8.0 percent in September; yet, that remained lower than July’s 9.0 percent pace.

Meanwhile, the Markit Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI increased from 50.3 to 50.7. That is good news, as the September figure had been the lowest level since July 2013, when Europe first emerged from its recession. October’s reading was higher largely due to a pickup in output (up from 51.0 to 51.9) and employment (up from 50.1 to 50.6). Still, new orders (unchanged at 49.3) contracted for the second straight month, with exports (down from 51.6 to 50.5) easing. The Eurozone continues to face challenges in manufacturing, especially in terms of falling sales. The results also vary by country, with Germany (up from 49.9 to 51.8) improving somewhat, while French manufacturers  (down 48.4 to 47.6) continue to report weakness.

Closer to home, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing PMI dropped slightly, down from 57.5 to 56.2. The pace of activity was down across-the-board, including new orders (down from 59.8 to 57.1), output (down from 59.6 to 58.0), hiring (down from 56.4 to 56.2) and exports (down from 54.1 to 51.9). While the index for new orders was at its lowest level since January’s 53.9 reading, it is hard to get too worked up over October’s decline for these indicators. After all, demand, production and employment continue to grow at decent rates, and manufacturers are reporting higher activity levels than earlier in the year.

Still, we would like to see better results to begin the fourth quarter, particularly for exports. Given the softness in worldwide markets, however, this weakness should not be a surprise.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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MAPI: Manufacturing Activity Expanded at a Slightly Slower Pace in October

The Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation (MAPI) Foundation said that its Composite Business Outlook Index dropped from 71 in July to 67 in October. Despite the decline, manufacturing activity remained quite strong, with index readings over 50 indicating expansion. Indeed, the pace of new orders was unchanged (78) at a healthy rate of growth in the fourth quarter report, continuing to reflect improvements from six months ago (71).

Still, several of the key indicators eased in this survey. This included export orders (down from 67 to 65), the orders backlog (down from 72 to 69), prospective U.S. shipments (down from 87 to 83) and prospective foreign shipments (down from 76 to 72). Each of these readings, however, continues to reflect both strong growth.

In contrast, there were some areas of weakness to note. The percentage of respondents operating above 85 percent capacity dropped from 30.0 percent in July to 26.7 percent in October. Expected business investments also slowed considerably in this survey, with 2015 U.S. investment spending nearly just barely above 2014’s pace (down from 67 to 52) whereas foreign investment activity was expected to decline next year relative to this year (down from 64 to 48). On the other hand, the rate of R&D spending was expected to accelerate slightly (up from 67 to 70).

Overall, these data support the notion that manufacturing activity continues to improve, mirroring similar findings from other indicators. The MAPI Foundation has a generally upbeat outlook for the coming months. They predict that manufacturing production will increase by 3.4 percent and 4.0 percent in 2014 and 2015, respectively.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Philly Fed: Manufacturing Activity Continued to Ease, but Growth Remains Strong

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said that manufacturing activity continued to ease, but growth remained strong in its district. The Manufacturing Business Outlook Survey’s composite index of general business activity has declined from 28.0 in August to 22.5 in September to 20.7 in October. While this figure has decreased somewhat, sentiment remains mostly positive. For instance, just over one-third of manufacturers in the Philly Fed district felt that business activity had increased in October, with 13.5 percent noting a worsening of conditions.

The pace of new orders (up from 15.5 to 17.3) picked up in October, which bodes well for future activity. This shift occurred largely because the percentage of respondents citing declining sales dropped from 22.1 percent in September to 18.9 percent in October. At the same time, rates of growth for shipments (down from 21.6 to 16.6) and employment (down from 21.2 to 12.1) have both decelerated for the month. Along those lines, the average workweek contracted slightly, down from 4.4 to -1.3, falling for the first time since February.

Manufacturers remained overwhelmingly upbeat in their outlook despite a decrease in the forward-looking composite measure (down from 56.0 to 54.5). In fact, 58.0 percent of respondents anticipate increased new orders in the next 6 months, with 58.5 percent seeing higher shipment levels. Regarding employment, 33.1 percent expect to add new workers in the coming months, with just 5.1 percent indicating possible declines. Capital spending was also expected to increase at decent rates, particularly for equipment, computers and software and energy-saving investments.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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