Tag: Kansas City Fed

Monday Economic Report – March 2, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

While manufacturers remain mostly optimistic in their outlook, we have seen softness in a number of recent economic indicators. Slower economic growth internationally, a stronger U.S. dollar, reduced crude oil prices and the West Coast ports slowdown have been cited as reasons for this weaker-than-desired performance. Along those lines, real GDP growth in the fourth quarter was revised lower, down from 2.6 percent to 2.2 percent. In addition, surveys from the Dallas, Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Banks all reflected decelerated levels of new orders and exports. Most notably, Texas manufacturers have been adversely impacted by the sharp drop in petroleum prices, dampening demand throughout the energy supply chain and for the larger regional economy. Yet, even in the Dallas report, respondents continued to be more positive than negative in their expectations for sales, production, employment and capital spending over the next six months. (continue reading…)

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Kansas City Fed: Manufacturing Activity Slowed to a Near Crawl in February

The Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity slowed to a near crawl in February, mirroring the easing we have seen in other regions. The composite index of general business conditions dropped has declined from 8 in December to 3 in January to 1 in February. The silver lining, of course, is that activity in the sector continues to expand, albeit barely, as it has now for 14 straight months. Still, the weaker headline figure was pulled lower by contracting levels of new orders (down from -8 to -10), exports (down from -7 to -13) and employment (down from zero to -4). There were several reasons cited in the sample comments for the softness, including sluggish global growth, reduced crude oil prices and the West Coast ports slowdown. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – January 26, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The European Central Bank (ECB) finally announced its long-awaited quantitative easing program on Thursday. The ECB will purchase 60 million euros in bonds each month until September 2016—totaling at least 1.1 trillion euros overall—in an attempt to stimulate growth. Depending on where the Eurozone economy stands pointing September 2016, the ECB might extend its purchasing beyond that point. The impact on the euro was almost immediate, with the euro exchanging for $1.1206 at Friday’s close, down from $1.3927 on March 17, the high point of 2014. This will complicate manufacturers’ ability to sell goods into Europe, something that was mentioned in the sample comments in the latest Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank’s monthly survey (see below). (continue reading…)

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Kansas City Fed: Manufacturers Began the New Year on a Softer Note

The Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity slowed in January, beginning the new year on a softer note. The composite index of general business conditions dropped from 8 in December to 3 in January, its lowest level in five months. Underlying this figure, new orders (down from 14 to -8), production (down from 7 to -2), shipments (down from 8 to -5) and exports (down from zero to -7) declined for the month, and hiring (down from 8 to zero) stagnated. On the positive side, it was the 13th straight month with expanding levels of sentiment, and manufacturers remain mostly optimistic about the coming months. (continue reading…)

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Kansas City Fed: Manufacturing Activity Picked Up Somewhat in December

The Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity picked up somewhat in December. The composite index of general business conditions increased from 7 in November to 8 in December, accelerating for the second straight month. More importantly, the indices for new orders (up from 1 to 12) and shipments (up from 7 to 15) reflect some strengthening in demand and output after a weaker-than-desired October and November in the district. The pace of production and hiring reflected decent growth, with measures for both unchanged for the month. Another positive was the continuing deceleration in raw material costs, with that index down from 20 in September to 5 in December. Reduced energy prices likely accounted for this shift in cost pressures. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – November 24, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

Central banks around the world have acted recently in an attempt to lift a sagging global economy. On Friday, for instance, the European Central Bank (ECB) announced that it has begun purchasing asset-backed securities, finally beginning a quantitative easing program that some have long sought. Earlier in the day, ECB President Mario Draghi said that “we will do what we must” to spur economic growth. In addition, the People’s Bank of China surprised markets by cutting interest rates on Friday. These actions followed the Bank of Japan’s announcement on October 31 that it would increase the amount of its monthly asset purchases. (continue reading…)

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Kansas City Fed Reported Increased Manufacturing Activity in November

The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City said that manufacturing activity picked up somewhat in its district in November. The composite index rose from 4 in October to 7 in November, its highest level in four months. Along those lines, the pace of production (up from 3 to 9), shipments (up from zero to 7) and employment (up from 6 to 9) improved for the month. In addition, export sales (up from -9 to 8) were positive for the first time since April. Yet, growth remains far from robust, with new orders (down from 2 to 1) decelerating for the fourth consecutive month and just barely above neutral. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – October 27, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

What a difference a week makes. After a volatile week in financial markets amid worldwide economic worries, things calmed down last week. While the Dow Jones Industrial Average remains 2.7 percent below its all-time high on September 19, it gained 425 points last week, or 2.6percent. Attitudes shifted to a more positive stance on decent earnings reports and on news that firms remain mostly upbeat in their outlook. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – September 29, 2014

Here is the draft summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy grew an annualized 4.6 percent in the second quarter of this year, its fastest pace since the fourth quarter of 2011. Consumer and business spending were the big bright spots in the real GDP report, with strong rebounds after softness in the first quarter. This latest revision reflected improved nonresidential fixed investment and goods exports data relative to prior estimates. At the same time, it is hard to forget that real GDP fell by 2.1 percent in the first quarter, with growth in the first half of 2014 expanding by a frustratingly slow 1.2 percent. Moving forward, manufacturers remain mostly upbeat. For instance, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) held firm at 57.9, its fastest pace since May 2010.

I estimate real GDP growth of 3.3 percent for the third quarter, which ends this week. Nonetheless, there are a number of downside risks, and business leaders and the public remain tentative in their optimism.

Along those lines, regional surveys from the Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Banks continued to show expanding activity levels in their districts. The Richmond release found that activity has now grown for six straight months since winter-related contractions earlier in the year. It also reflected an uptick in production and demand, with the pace of hiring accelerating to its highest level since December 2010. All of this was encouraging. In the Kansas City district, manufacturers remained mostly positive, with more than half of respondents expecting increased production and shipments in the next six months. Among the issues cited in the Kansas City survey, manufacturers noted persistent challenges in attracting and retaining skilled workers. Other sample comments mentioned rising pricing pressures, both for wages and raw materials.

Turning to the global economy, the HSBC Flash China Manufacturing PMI edged slightly higher, up from 50.2 in August to 50.5 in September. This marked the fourth consecutive month with expanding manufacturing activity, improving from contractions in the first five months of the year. Yet, even with some signs of stabilization in China in recent data, the country is expected to continue to decelerate in its growth rates moving forward, something that it continues to grapple with. Similarly, the European Central Bank has struggled to cope with slow economic and income growth in the Eurozone, with persistent worries about deflation. Indeed, the Markit Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI eased yet again, down from 50.7 to 50.5. This was the lowest level of growth since July 2013, the first month that the Eurozone emerged from its deep two-year recession.

Meanwhile, housing data released last week were mixed. New home sales rose sharply, up from an annualized 427,000 in July to 504,000 in August. This was the highest level in more than six years, and the pace of sales in August starkly contrasts with what we have seen so far in 2014. This makes it likely that September figures will pull back a little, but the trend line remains promising. In contrast, existing home sales decreased 1.8 percent in August, which was disappointing given recent improvements. It is likely that August’s decline was the result of a strong July reading, with some easing probably inevitable. Moving forward, the expectation is that existing home sales should move higher, continuing a longer-run trend in the data since March.

This week, the focus will be on jobs. After a disappointing employment report in August, we anticipate better news in September. I would not be surprised if the zero jobs figure in August for manufacturing was revised higher, and I continue to expect manufacturing jobs gains to revert to an average of 12,500 to 15,000 per month for the rest of the year. Nonfarm payrolls should once again exceed 200,000 in September, an improvement from the 142,000 figure in August (which is also likely to get revised upward). Other highlights this week include the latest data on construction spending, factory orders, international trade, personal income and manufacturing activity in the Dallas Federal Reserve district.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

real GDP forecast - sept2014

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Kansas City Fed: After Slowing in August, Manufacturing Activity Picked Up a Little in September

The Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank said that manufacturing activity picked up a little in September, rebounding after slowing in August. The composite index of general business conditions increased from 3 in August to 6 in September. Through the first nine months of 2014, the main index has averaged 6.7, peaking at 10 in both March and May. As such, we continue to see modest gains among manufacturers in the Kansas City Fed district, with mostly positive expectations about the future.

For instance, the index for production rose from 4 in July to 12 in August, with the percentage of survey respondents saying that output had increased for the month rising from 25 percent to 34 percent. In contrast, one-quarter of those taking the survey said that their production levels were falling. Similar figures could be seen for shipments (up from 2 to 14). Employment shifted into positive territory (up from -4 to 7), with the average workweek also improving (up from -1 to 2). On the downside, the pace of new orders eased marginally, down from 6 to 5.

Several of the sample comments discussed skills shortages. As one respondent put it, “It is still very difficult to fill open positions for any type of worker from production to professional. I am seeing the same issue everywhere in our community.” The other issue of note in the comments was pricing pressures, both for wages and raw materials.  With that said, domestic energy production was mentioned as a positive for manufacturers in the region.

Looking ahead six months, manufacturers in the district remained optimistic overall. While the future-oriented composite index was unchanged at 17, over half of the respondents anticipate higher levels of production and shipments in the next six months. Moreover, the percentage expecting increased new orders rose from 38 percent to 44 percent for the months. Around 30 percent of those taking the survey plan to hire new workers or invest in more capital.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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