Tag: exports

Monday Economic Report – January 12, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy generated 2.95 million net new nonfarm payroll workers in 2014, the fastest annual pace since 1999. In addition, the unemployment rate fell to 5.6 percent, its lowest level since June 2008. One might quibble that these figures overstate the overall health of the labor market, with part-time employment and unemployment still being a challenge. Indeed, the participation rate remains near 30-year lows. Still, the data suggest movement in the right direction. Manufacturers, for instance, hired an additional 15,500 workers on average each month in 2014, with 762,000 more employees since the end of 2009. The sector currently employs just more than 12.2 million workers. Therefore, manufacturing employment has increased at a decent pace of late, consistent with a mostly upbeat outlook. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


ISM: Slower Manufacturing Growth in December, but Notable Improvements from Earlier in the Year

The Institute for Supply Management said that growth in manufacturing activity slowed somewhat in December. The manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI) dropped from 58.7 in November to 55.5 in December, its lowest level in six months. While this was disappointing, it is important to note that new orders (down from 66.0 to 57.3) and production (down from 64.4 to 58.8) continued to expand at decent levels, albeit with less strength that in prior months. Indeed, this was the first time since June that the new orders index had been below 60, and December’s production figure ended seven consecutive months with that index exceeding 60. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Markit: Chinese Manufacturing Activity Contracted for the First Time Since May

The Chinese economy continues to slow, with the HSBC Flash China Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) contracting for the first time since May. The headline index declined from 50.0 in November to 49.5 in December. New orders (down from 51.3 to 49.6), output (up from 49.6 to 49.7) and employment (up from 48.7 to 48.9) were below 50 – the threshold signifying reduced activity – in December, with production declining for the second straight month. On the positive side, new export orders (up from 51.1 to 51.7) were still growing somewhat modestly. As such, this report suggests that the Chinese economy is ending 2014 much as it began it, with softness in the manufacturing sector. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Global Manufacturing Economic Update – December 12, 2014

Here are the files for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update:

It has become increasingly clear over the past few weeks that North America stands out as a bright spot in an ever-challenging global economic environment. Real GDP in the United States grew an annualized 4.2 percent in the second and third quarters, and U.S. manufacturers remain mostly optimistic about the next year. Indeed, the U.S. economy is expected to expand by around 3 percent, its fastest rate in a decade. Likewise, Canada and Mexico — our two largest trading partners — have made improvements in their respective economies since earlier this year. Canada has the distinction of having the highest purchasing managers’ index (PMI) of any of our top 10 trading partners, holding steady in November at 55.3. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Monday Economic Report – December 8, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

This morning, we will release the results from the latest NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers. Business leaders continue to reflect optimism about the coming months, with 91.2 percent of survey respondents saying they are either somewhat or very positive about their own company’s outlook. Moreover, manufacturers predict growth of 4.5 percent in sales and 2.1 percent in employment  over the next 12 months, with both experiencing the strongest pace in at least two years. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


ISM: Manufacturing Activity Remained Healthy in November

The Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI) edged marginally lower, down from 59.0 in October to 58.7 in November. October’s reading had been the highest level since March 2011. Despite the slight decrease, it is clear that manufacturing activity remained healthy in November. The headline PMI figure has averaged 58.1 so far in the second half of 2014, which represents progress from the average of 54.0 for the first half of the year. Moreover, the sector has largely rebounded from the weather-related softness in January (51.3). (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Markit: Chinese and European Economies Stalled in November

The HSBC Flash China Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) fell to neutral (50) in November, down from 50.4 in October. This was the weakest reading since Chinese respondents noted contracting levels of activity from January through May. Indeed, output contracted once again (down from 50.7 to 49.5) for the first time since May, which was not a good sign. Hiring (down from 48.9 to 48.4) was also negative for the 13th straight month. On the positive side, new orders (up from 51.2 to 51.4) edged slightly higher, and exports (down from 51.7 to 50.5) continued to expand, albeit at a much slower pace. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


ISM: Strong Gains in the Manufacturing Sector in October

The Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI) grew strongly in October, rebounding after a disappointing headline figure in September. The main index rose from 56.6 in September to 59.0 in October, back to where it had been in August. As such, the August and October readings were both the highest levels since March 2011, suggesting healthy gains in the sector as we move into the fourth quarter. (continue reading…)

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Somewhat Better Manufacturing Data in China and Europe for October, But Weaknesses Persist

The HSBC Flash China PMI rose to its highest level in three months, up from 50.2 in September to 50.4 in October. It was the fifth consecutive monthly expansion in manufacturing activity in China, an improvement from the contracting activity levels experienced in the first five months of 2014. Yet, despite the better headline figure, many of the underlying data points reflect some easing in growth rates for the month, including new orders (down from 51.5 to 51.4), exports (down from 54.5 to 52.8) and output (down from 51.3 to 50.7). Hiring continued to decline but at a slower rate (up from 47.5 to 48.6).

As such, Chinese manufacturers are expanding but not by as much as we might prefer. This finding is consistent with the deceleration in other Chinese data, including real GDP, which slowed from 7.5 percent year-over-year growth in the second quarter to 7.3 percent in the third quarter. Fixed real investment (down from 16.5 percent year-over-year in August to 16.1 percent in September) and retail sales (down from 11.9 percent year-over-year to 11.6 percent) also declined. On the positive side, industrial production picked up, increasing from the year-over-year rate of 6.9 percent in August to 8.0 percent in September; yet, that remained lower than July’s 9.0 percent pace.

Meanwhile, the Markit Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI increased from 50.3 to 50.7. That is good news, as the September figure had been the lowest level since July 2013, when Europe first emerged from its recession. October’s reading was higher largely due to a pickup in output (up from 51.0 to 51.9) and employment (up from 50.1 to 50.6). Still, new orders (unchanged at 49.3) contracted for the second straight month, with exports (down from 51.6 to 50.5) easing. The Eurozone continues to face challenges in manufacturing, especially in terms of falling sales. The results also vary by country, with Germany (up from 49.9 to 51.8) improving somewhat, while French manufacturers  (down 48.4 to 47.6) continue to report weakness.

Closer to home, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing PMI dropped slightly, down from 57.5 to 56.2. The pace of activity was down across-the-board, including new orders (down from 59.8 to 57.1), output (down from 59.6 to 58.0), hiring (down from 56.4 to 56.2) and exports (down from 54.1 to 51.9). While the index for new orders was at its lowest level since January’s 53.9 reading, it is hard to get too worked up over October’s decline for these indicators. After all, demand, production and employment continue to grow at decent rates, and manufacturers are reporting higher activity levels than earlier in the year.

Still, we would like to see better results to begin the fourth quarter, particularly for exports. Given the softness in worldwide markets, however, this weakness should not be a surprise.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Global Manufacturing Economic Report – October 10, 2014

Here is the summary for this month’s Global Manufacturing Economic Update: 

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) slightly downgraded its global outlook earlier this week, with Asia, Europe and South America growing slower than expected three months ago. The IMF now expects world output to expand 3.3 percent and 3.8 percent in 2014 and 2015, respectively, down from 3.4 percent and 4.0 percent as estimated in its July report. One notable exception to this downward trend was the United States, with the IMF raising its 2014 forecast from 1.7 percent to 2.2 percent real GDP growth. This reflects recent strength in the U.S. economy, particularly when compared to other nations. To be fair, the IMF had more optimistic expectations for growth coming into this year, projecting 2.8 percent growth in 2014 in its January report. After disappointing growth in the first quarter, however, it lowered its outlook projections, much like everyone else.

One of the bigger challenges remains Europe. The Markit Eurozone Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) continued to decelerate in September, with activity just shy of being stagnant. New orders contracted for the first time since June 2013, when the Eurozone was emerging from its deep two-year recession. Indeed, the fear is that Europe will once again sink back into recession, with contracting levels of activity seen in four nations in September: Austria, France, Germany and Greece. Of particular note on this list was Germany, the largest economy in Europe. Real GDP was unchanged in the second quarter, down from 0.2 percent growth in the first quarter. Meanwhile, both industrial production and retail sales were higher in August. We will get new production data next week, and it is expected to be softer. For its part, the European Central Bank kept its monetary policies unchanged, but there is an expectation of further stimulus in the coming months.

Meanwhile, Brazil, Russia, India and China also continue to experience softness. Brazil shifted into its fifth contraction so far this year, but investors are cautiously optimistic about the upcoming runoff election between incumbent President Dilma Rousseff and Aécio Neves, who is favored by business leaders. Russia, India and China are growing, but just barely. China’s manufacturing sector has shown signs of stabilization, but stronger growth remains elusive. A number of key economic indicators in China have continued to decelerate this year, including industrial production, and it is likely that real GDP will decline from 7.5 percent growth in the second quarter to 7.3 percent in the third quarter. India’s PMI figure in September was at its lowest point this year, and Russian exports continue to fall. Nonetheless, it was not all bad news in the emerging markets. For instance, Indonesia, Turkey and Vietnam had their paces of new orders shift from negative to positive for the month, which bodes well for them.

The U.S. trade deficit narrowed marginally in August, although export growth remains sluggish so far this year. Looking at the top 10 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods, four countries (Brazil, Germany, Hong Kong and South Korea) experienced contracting levels of activity in September, which hampers our ability to sell products there. In addition, Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom also had marginally deteriorated demand and output in September, even as each continues to grow modestly. In contrast, manufacturing activity in Mexico and the Netherlands accelerated slightly in September.

U.S. trade negotiations in the Asia Pacific are moving forward with major meetings in Australia and China later this month and next. United States–European Union negotiations face increased controversy and new leadership at the EU Commission and Parliament. And, with the World Trade Organization’s Trade Facilitation Agreement facing a continued stalemate, there are efforts to move the information technology talks to a conclusion and engage in the detailed environmental goods talks. The U.S. Export-Import Bank was granted a nine-month extension, but manufacturers remain highly concerned that continued uncertainty will put U.S. exporters at a disadvantage in global markets. Efforts continue to move forward on a host of trade legislation, including Trade Promotion Authority, the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill, customs reauthorization and the Generalized System of Preferences.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

markit pmi for top 10 markets - oct2014

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


A Manufacturing Blog

  • Categories

  • Connect With Manufacturers

            
  • Blogroll