Tag: durable goods orders

Monday Economic Report – March 2, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

While manufacturers remain mostly optimistic in their outlook, we have seen softness in a number of recent economic indicators. Slower economic growth internationally, a stronger U.S. dollar, reduced crude oil prices and the West Coast ports slowdown have been cited as reasons for this weaker-than-desired performance. Along those lines, real GDP growth in the fourth quarter was revised lower, down from 2.6 percent to 2.2 percent. In addition, surveys from the Dallas, Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Banks all reflected decelerated levels of new orders and exports. Most notably, Texas manufacturers have been adversely impacted by the sharp drop in petroleum prices, dampening demand throughout the energy supply chain and for the larger regional economy. Yet, even in the Dallas report, respondents continued to be more positive than negative in their expectations for sales, production, employment and capital spending over the next six months. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – February 2, 2015

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy grew 2.4 percent in 2014, just barely edging out the 2.2 percent gain in 2013. Yet, that somewhat understates the strength of the economy since the winter-related weaknesses seen at this point last year. Indeed, real GDP increased by an annualized 4.1 percent during the last three quarters of 2014, and in the fourth quarter, Americans spent at a healthy 4.3 percent annual pace, the fastest rate since the first quarter of 2006. Still, the 2.6 percent growth rate in real GDP in the fourth quarter also had some red flags. Weaker growth abroad, a strengthening U.S. dollar and worries about dramatically lower energy prices have impacted capital spending and international demand negatively. Therefore, while manufacturers remain mostly upbeat about orders and production in 2015, these developments serve as a reminder of the challenges in the global marketplace right now. (continue reading…)

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Durable Goods Orders Were Disappointing in December

The Census Bureau said that new durable goods orders fell 3.4 percent in December, ending the year on a weak note. Orders for durable goods declined in four of the past five months. As such, manufacturing activity in the second half of 2014 was less than desired, providing a bit of a contrast with better demand and sentiment data elsewhere. The sluggish global economic environment probably played a role in this softness. On a year-over-year basis, durable goods orders have risen only 0.3 percent since December 2013. On the other hand, they were up 2.9 percent from the weather-related slowdown of January 2014. (continue reading…)

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Factory Orders Declined in October for the Third Straight Month

The Census Bureau said that new factory orders declined 0.7 percent in October, extending the 0.5 percent decrease observed in September. It was the third straight monthly decline; although, August’s fall was the response from surging aircraft orders in July. Overall, the October numbers were a disappointment, with softness across-the-board. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – December 1, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy grew 3.9 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, according to revised real GDP data released last week. This was better than the 3.5 percent original estimate, and more importantly, it suggests real GDP increased at an annualized 4.2 percent over the past two quarters. The report highlighted a number of positive elements in the economy, including healthy increases in consumer and business spending, goods exports and end-of-fiscal-year government spending. The revision also included better inventory replenishment numbers than originally estimated. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – November 3, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

The U.S. economy grew 3.5 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, representing decent growth following the disappointing first half of 2014. Consumer and business spending, which rebounded strongly in the second quarter, extended those gains in the third quarter, albeit with some easing in the pace of growth. Exports were also up strongly for the quarter, and imports were down. Dramatic inventory swings over the past three quarters were also evident, with stockpiles searching for a new normal. After adding 1.47 percentage points to real GDP in the second quarter, slower inventory replenishment subtracted 0.57 percent in the third quarter, making it one of the few negatives in the report. (continue reading…)

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New Orders for Durable Goods Were Surprisingly Soft in September

The Census Bureau reported that new durable goods orders were surprisingly soft in September, decreasing 1.3 percent. To be fair, much of that decline stemmed from lower defense and nondefense aircraft sales—a highly volatile segment of the market where orders are often quite choppy. Excluding transportation, new durable goods orders were off 0.2 percent, which, while somewhat more favorable, continued to reflect weakness. Retail sales were also lower in September, with consumer spending quite cautious overall. Therefore, this latest report would be somewhat consistent with that finding.

(continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – July 28, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) released its latest World Economic Outlook last week. The report reflected slower growth rates in the United States and elsewhere for 2014 mostly because of disappointing figures during the first half of the year. The IMF now predicts that U.S. real GDP will grow 1.7 percent in 2014, down from the 2.8 percent forecast in April. Much of this downgrade stemmed from the dismal 2.9 percent decline in real GDP in the first quarter, with output contracting for the first time in three years. At the same time, the manufacturing sector provided a positive contribution to growth in the first quarter, according to new data, despite bleakness in other areas. Fortunately, manufacturers are more upbeat about activity during the second half of this year and for next year. The IMF’s outlook for 2015 is for real GDP growth of 3.0 percent in the United States, which is in line with other predictions.

News regarding manufacturing activity was mostly positive last week, with surveys from the Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Banks both reflecting a pickup in shipments and employment in July. New orders continued to grow at a moderate pace in each region, and respondents were mostly upbeat about sales and production over the next six months. Nonetheless, raw material costs have accelerated a bit in the Richmond district, and new export orders have contracted in eight of the past 12 months in the Kansas City district. Meanwhile, new durable goods orders rebounded in June, with year-to-date growth at a reasonably healthy rate of 4.4 percent. This indicates that the sector has recovered for the most part from winter-related softness, even if some components, such as motor vehicle sales, were lower for the month. Similarly, the Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) reflected relatively strong growth in sales and output for the sector despite some easing in the headline number in July.

Overseas, the data indicate that the Chinese economy has continued to stabilize from weakness in the first five months of the year. The HSBC Flash China Manufacturing PMI expanded for the second straight month in July, with the pace of activity up for new orders, exports and output. The sales pace was the fastest since January 2011, suggesting that recent measures taken by the Chinese government to stimulate growth have had a positive impact. Likewise, Japanese manufacturers also reported expanding levels of sentiment for two consecutive months, but activity decelerated overall and output stagnated. Export sales from Japan, on the other hand, grew. In other news, the European manufacturing sector made marginal progress in July, particularly for production and exports, and the Eurozone has now expanded for 13 straight months. Yet, growth varied from country to country. For instance, German manufacturing activity picked up in July, while the French economy continued to contract.

The other highlights last week centered on housing and pricing. The housing market remains weaker than we would like, as illustrated by the sharp drop in new home sales in June. Still, the June figure was consistent with the annual paces in March and April, with May’s sales numbers appearing to be an outlier. With the slower pace of sales, inventories of homes have increased. In contrast, existing home sales improved for the third straight month, with some progress in the second quarter relative to the softer first quarter. Even in the existing home sales release, however, there were some discouraging findings, including the fact that sales remain below where they were last year and that first-time homebuyers are still having difficulties making purchases. Meanwhile, on the inflation front, the consumer price index increased in June, led by higher gasoline costs. Yet, pricing pressures remain mostly in check, with core inflation up 1.9 percent over the past 12 months.

This week, the focus will be on second-quarter GDP and jobs. The expectation is that output will rebound from the drop in the first quarter, with consensus forecasts ranging from 2.5 percent to 3.5 percent growth. My view is that real GDP in the second quarter should exceed 3.0 percent. Regarding hiring, manufacturers have added, on average, more than 12,500 each month since August, and I would anticipate seeing a comparable figure for July. Nonfarm payrolls should increase by at least the roughly 230,000 average so far in 2014. Other items to look for this week include manufacturing survey results from the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank and the latest numbers for construction spending, consumer sentiment, employment costs and personal income and spending.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers.

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New Durable Goods Orders Increased 0.7 Percent in June, Rebounding from May’s Decline

The Census Bureau said that new durable goods orders increased 0.7 percent in June, rebounding from a 1.0 percent decline in May. This suggests that durable goods sales have continued to recover from winter-related softness in December and January, and it was mostly in-line with consensus estimates. Through the first six months of this year, new durable goods orders have risen 4.4 percent, which indicates reasonably healthy growth year-to-date.

Unlike previous reports, transportation orders did not skew the data by much, with the sector having sales growth of 0.6 percent for the month. If you were to exclude transportation, June’s new durable goods orders would have increased by 0.8 percent, with a year-to-date gain of 4.4 percent.

The underlying sector-by-sector data were mostly positive. The largest increases were observed in defense aircraft and parts (up 15.3 percent), nondefense aircraft and parts (up 8.2 percent), machinery (up 2.4 percent), primary metals (up 0.9 percent) and computers and electronic products (up 0.8 percent). On the other hand, motor vehicles and parts (down 2.1 percent), which have been a bright spot in general of late, were a drag on growth in June. Year-to-date, motor vehicle and parts orders have increased 2.2 percent.

Meanwhile, durable goods shipments were up a more-paltry 0.1 percent in June, offsetting the 0.1 percent decrease in May. Excluding transportation (which was up 0.7 percent, mainly on nondefense aircraft), durable goods shipments would have fallen by 0.1 percent. This indicates that shipments activity was weaker than the headline figure suggests. In fact, the data were mixed. Increased shipments for communications equipment (up 3.3 percent), primary metals (up 0.8 percent) and fabricated metal products (up 0.7 percent) were largely counterbalanced by declines in defense aircraft and parts (down 2.3 percent), motor vehicles and parts (down 2.0 percent) and machinery (down 2.0 percent).

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Monday Economic Report – June 30, 2014

Here are the files for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The U.S. economy contracted in the first quarter more than we previously thought, with real GDP down 2.9 percent at the annual rate. The sharply lower revision was much worse than the previous estimate of a 1.0 percent drop. Decreased inventory spending and weaker goods exports accounted for much of the decline in output, but consumer spending on services also increased at a slower pace than earlier reports suggested, contributing to the latest revision. Fixed investment and government spending were also drags on growth. Overall, the data confirm that economic activity started 2014 on a disappointing note, but they also suggest that this softness went beyond weather-related slowdowns.

However, the real GDP data also point to a possible strong rebound in the current quarter. For instance, inventory spending is likely to pick up as more firms restock their shelves. In addition, other data point to recoveries in manufacturing activity and retail sales in the second quarter, which should help boost consumer and business spending figures. Real GDP should exceed 3 percent in the second quarter, bouncing back from the weak data in the first quarter. Moreover, manufacturers remain mostly positive about the second half of this year. Perhaps that is why financial markets seemed to mostly shrug off the bad news on real GDP last week.

Indeed, many of the measures of health for the manufacturing sector remain encouraging. The Markit Flash U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) increased from 56.4 in May to 57.5 in June. This was its fastest pace in more than four years, led by strong gains in both new orders and output. Manufacturer sentiment in both China and Japan also stabilized after contractions in previous months. At the same time, manufacturing activity in the Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Bank districts continued to expand, albeit with both at slower paces than the month before. These two releases were largely consistent with other regional surveys, including those from New York and Philadelphia, showing rebounds since the winter months.

Still, not all of the manufacturing news out last week was positive. Durable goods orders fell 1.0 percent in May, reflecting weaker-than-anticipated growth for the sector. Much of that decline stemmed from reduced nondefense aircraft and parts sales, although the broader data were also mixed. Meanwhile, European manufacturing activity continued to decelerate. The Markit Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI declined from 52.5 to 51.9, falling for the second straight month. Slower growth on the continent has weakened many of the key activity measures, including new orders, output, exports and employment. Of course, it is also worth noting that Europe’s expansion remains uneven, with Germany seeing a marginal gain in activity in June while France fell back into a contraction.

In other news, personal spending improved in May after remaining flat in April, assisted by a decent rebound in durable goods purchases. Personal income also showed a slight uptick, with manufacturing wages and salaries continuing to move higher. Such reports have helped to lift consumer confidence, with data from the Conference Board’s index increasing to its highest level in more than six years. The consumer sentiment measure from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters also edged higher, but with persistent anxieties about future economic and income growth. Finally, there were encouraging headlines on the housing market last week, with strong gains in both existing and new home sales in May.

This week, we will get new jobs numbers on Thursday—one day earlier due to the Independence Day holiday on Friday. I would expect employment growth similar to what we saw in May, with a consensus estimate of 210,000 additional nonfarm payroll workers and around 10,000 or so net new manufacturing employees. There will also be new PMI data from the Institute for Supply Management and international trade figures. Each will be closely watched, with manufacturing activity expected to pick up and we hope better news for exports. Other highlights include news releases for construction spending, factory orders and manufacturing activity in the Dallas Federal Reserve district.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

contributions to change in real GDP - jun2014

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