Tag: consumer confidence

Conference Board: Consumer Confidence Unexpectedly Fell in November

The Conference Board said that consumer sentiment unexpectedly fell in November. The Consumer Confidence Index was anticipated to build on October’s revised 94.1 reading, which was the highest since October 2007. Instead, the index declined to 88.7 in November, its lowest level since June. This figure has seesawed over the past four months, with the index up in August, down in September and then up and down again in October and November. (continue reading…)

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University of Michigan: Consumer Confidence at Highest Point Since July 2007

The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters said that consumer confidence rose to its highest level since July 2007. Preliminary Consumer Sentiment Index data increased from 86.9 in October to 89.4 in November. This reflects continued improvement in Americans’ perceptions about the U.S. economy, with the headline figure rising from 75.1 in November 2013 (in the aftermath of the budget shutdown). Moreover, it mirrors similar data from the Conference Board, which also has reached a pre-recessionary high of late. (continue reading…)

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Monday Economic Report – November 3, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report:

The U.S. economy grew 3.5 percent at the annual rate in the third quarter, representing decent growth following the disappointing first half of 2014. Consumer and business spending, which rebounded strongly in the second quarter, extended those gains in the third quarter, albeit with some easing in the pace of growth. Exports were also up strongly for the quarter, and imports were down. Dramatic inventory swings over the past three quarters were also evident, with stockpiles searching for a new normal. After adding 1.47 percentage points to real GDP in the second quarter, slower inventory replenishment subtracted 0.57 percent in the third quarter, making it one of the few negatives in the report. (continue reading…)

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Conference Board: After Ebbing in September, Consumer Confidence Rebounded in October

The Conference Board said that consumer sentiment rebounded in October after ebbing in September. The Consumer Confidence Index rose from 89.0 in September to 94.5 in October. This was higher than the 93.4 reading observed in August, and both figures were the highest since October 2007, seven years ago and pre-dating the recession. Overall, Americans have become more confident over the course of the past year. In October 2013, the index stood at 72.0, and the public was worried about economic growth in light of the budget deadlock and the government shutdown. (continue reading…)

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University of Michigan: Consumer Confidence Rose to a Pre-Recessionary High in October

The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters said that preliminary data on consumer confidence reflects a pre-recessionary high in October. The Consumer Sentiment Index increased from 84.6 in September to 86.4 in October, its highest level since July 2007. This mirrors similar data from the Conference Board, which has also reached pre-recessionary levels of late (although that measure unexpectedly declined in September, reflecting a public that remains on edge).

Even with the increase in October, the University of Michigan report also shows these anxieties. The index for the current economic environment was unchanged at 98.9, and it remains below its recent peak of 99.8 in August. Geopolitical events, slowing global growth, stock market volatility and worries about Ebola might help to explain this hesitance. Moreover, Americans remain concerned about labor market and income growth, despite better data of late on the hiring front.

At the same time, the future-oriented index rose from 75.4 to 78.4, its highest level in two years. Lower gasoline prices likely lifted people’s spirits, helping to increase disposable income, at least for now. Overall, this survey suggests that consumers’ views about the economy are quite nuanced, and at least for this month, optimism about the future outweighed the concerns.

We will get final data on October consumer sentiment from the University of Michigan on October 31. The Conference Board will also release its survey data on consumer confidence on October 28.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Monday Economic Report – October 6, 2014

Here are the files for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Several recent indicators have shown marked improvements in the U.S. economy and for manufacturing activity, particularly when compared to earlier in the year. These range from the NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers to increased levels of demand and output. Last week, for instance, the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) reported that the pace of production (up from 64.5 to 64.6) was marginally higher in September, with the index exceeding 60—indicating strong growth—for four consecutive months. Likewise, the new orders index has measured 60 or higher for three straight months, even though it eased somewhat in September (down from 66.7 to 60.0). That was an encouraging sign, and it was consistent with a relatively upbeat outlook as noted by the National Association for Business Economics (NABE).

Yet, the headline ISM Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) for manufacturing unexpectedly dropped from 59.0 to 56.6. The prior month’s reading had been a three-year high, making the deceleration in sentiment a bit of a disappointment. The drop stemmed from slower paces of growth for domestic sales, exports (down from 55.0 to 53.5) and employment (down from 58.1 to 54.6). Along those lines, manufacturers added just 4,000 net new workers in September, with August’s employment number revised lower to reflect a decline of 4,000 employees for the sector. As such, we have had two straight months of disappointing manufacturing jobs numbers, which stand in stark contrast to the stronger hiring rates seen prior to August. We can hope for healthier job gains in the coming months, which would be more consistent with the mostly optimistic tone seen in other measures.

Indeed, the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank’s manufacturing survey noted robust pickups in production, capacity utilization and shipments in September, and respondents continue to expect stronger activity levels over the next six months. In addition, factory shipments have risen 2.1 percent year-to-date through August, or 3.1 percent over the past 12 months. The corresponding data on new factory orders reflected a sharp decline in August, but that was the result of very strong nondefense aircraft sales in July. While new manufactured goods sales remained soft when excluding transportation orders, the underlying data also reflect gains made since the winter months. Moreover, manufacturers have been confident enough in their outlook to increase construction spending, which rose 1.5 percent in August, increasing for the fifth straight month. Year-over-year growth in manufacturing construction spending was an impressive 14.9 percent.

At the consumer level, personal spending rebounded in August after holding steading in July. Since winter-related declines in January, personal spending has risen 2.7 percent, with 4.1 percent growth year-over-year. Strength in durable goods purchases boosted the August consumption figure. Still, Americans remain anxious, particularly about labor and income growth. The Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index declined from 93.4 in August to 86.0 in September, a notable and sizable decrease especially after the index had been at its highest point since October 2007 in August. It is possible that geopolitical events have put the public on edge, dampening enthusiasm. (The same could probably be said of the ISM report discussed above.) We have similar concerns in comparable data from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters, and the two releases support the notion that the consumer remains cautious despite recent improvements in sentiment.

Meanwhile, the U.S. trade deficit narrowed from $40.32 billion in July to $40.11 billion in August, its lowest level since January. In general, we have seen the trade deficit decline after peaking at $45.98 billion in April. Since then, goods exports have increased by $3.79 billion, and goods imports have declined by $1.99 billion, helping to explain the bulk of the shift over that four-month period. Much of that improvement can be explained by increased energy exports and reduced energy imports.

After a busy economic data release calendar last week, this week will be much lighter. The minutes of the September 16–17 Federal Open Market Committee meeting will be released on Wednesday, with market watchers looking for clues for when the Federal Reserve will start raising short-term rates. Other highlights include the latest data on consumer credit, job openings and wholesale trade.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

manufacturing construction - oct2014

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Conference Board: Consumer Confidence Unexpectedly Fell in September

The Conference Board said that consumer sentiment unexpectedly fell in September to its lowest level since May. The Consumer Confidence Index declined from a revised 93.4 in August to 86.0 in September. This pullback was even more disappointing given the fact that August’s reading had been the highest since October 2007, nearly seven years ago and pre-dating the recession. Therefore, while confidence remains higher today than earlier in the year, it is clear that Americans still remain anxious about the economy and about labor and income growth. It is also possible that geopolitical events have put the public on edge, dampening optimism. We have similar concerns in comparable data from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters.

Indeed, perceptions about current (down from 93.9 to 89.4) and future (down from 93.1 to 83.7) conditions were both lower for the month, particularly the latter. The percentage of respondents saying that jobs were “plentiful” dropped from 17.6 percent to 15.1 percent, and the percentage expecting their incomes to decrease rose from 11.6 percent to 13.4 percent. These data tend to suggest that there are nagging worries about jobs and the economy. Yet, there were also some positives. The percentage of those taking the survey who felt that their incomes would increase rose from 15.5 percent to 16.8 percent, and overall, many of these measures had made improvements over recent months despite the declines in September.

Buying intentions were also mixed, largely mirroring the reduced confidence described above. The percentages planning to buy a new automobile (down from 13.5 to 12.0 percent) and home (down from 5.3 percent to 4.9 percent) were both lower; yet, the percentage planning to purchase new appliances increased from 45.7 percent to 51.3 percent.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Monday Economic Report – September 15, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

The latest NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers found that businesses are generally upbeat about the coming months. Manufacturing respondents expect 4.4 percent growth in sales on average over the next 12 months, the fastest pace of expected growth in new orders since the first quarter of 2012, when the sector was expanding more robustly. Indeed, nearly half of those taking the survey anticipate sales growth of at least 5 percent. Capital investment and hiring trends have also moved in the right direction, with manufacturers planning to increase capital spending and employment by 2.5 percent and 1.9 percent, respectively. The hiring figure represents substantial progress from the lackluster pace of job growth in 2013, which averaged just 0.8 percent. Overall, 87.3 percent said that they were positive in their outlook, the highest reading in two and a half years.

Nonetheless, the more positive attitude needs to be balanced against other issues. First, enthusiasm for expanded new orders and production is often nuanced by anxieties that events might prevent the economy from gaining traction—much as it has time and again in this recovery. Certainly, many of them are disappointed with the slow economic growth in the first half of 2014, even if they remain hopeful about the second half.

Second, manufacturers—like many Americans—continue to be frustrated with Washington. The top business challenges remain rising health insurance costs and an unfavorable business climate, cited by 77.1 percent and 73.1 percent, respectively, in the survey. Along those lines, the NAM released a study showing the disproportionate burden placed on small businesses and manufacturers when complying with federal regulations. Total federal compliance costs in 2012 were estimated to be $2.028 trillion, with an average cost of $19,564 per employee for manufacturers, or twice the level of all businesses.

Beyond these issues, there was encouraging news on the consumer front. Retail sales rose 0.6 percent in August, rebounding from softer increases in the previous three months. Prior to this release, there were worries that a more cautious consumer might derail brighter prospects for growth. This data suggests that the public might be more willing to spend. Retail sales have risen 3.8 percent year-to-date, or 5.0 percent over the past 12 months. Moreover, the consumer also appears to be less hesitant about borrowing, with July consumer credit up 9.7 percent in July. This included a sizable pickup in revolving credit, which includes credit cards. Another positive was the increase in consumer sentiment from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters, ending a lull in that measure throughout 2014 and marking its highest point since July 2013.

This morning, we will get new data on industrial production. Production in the sector jumped one percent in July, and the expectation is for modest gains in manufacturing output in August. It is also anticipated that housing starts and permits will once again exceeding one million annualized units when August figures are released on Thursday. This would suggest that residential construction activity has begun to recover from softness earlier in the year. Beyond those figures, the biggest headlines will come from the Federal Open Market Committee meeting this week, which is not expected to make any major shifts in monetary policy. Quantitative easing should end in October, with the largest focus being uncertainty over when the Federal Reserve will start raising short-term rates. With that said, new consumer and producer price data should reflect the recent easing in inflationary pressures, particularly from lower energy costs.

Other data releases this week include the latest findings on manufacturing activity in the New York and Philadelphia Federal Reserve Banks’ districts and data on home builder confidence, leading indicators and state employment.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

retail sales - sept2014

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University of Michigan: Consumer Confidence Has Risen Somewhat in September

The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters said that preliminary data on consumer confidence reflects a slight increase in September. The Consumer Sentiment Index increased from 82.5 in August to 84.6 in September, its highest level since July 2013. These figures suggest that the lull in confidence that we have seen so far this year might finally be starting to dissipate. Prior to the September reading, for instance, the University of Michigan index has averaged just 81.9, and it was little changed since recovering from the budget showdown last fall. In contrast, the Conference Board’s confidence measure has reached pre-recessionary highs in its most recent report.

The subcomponents in the University of Michigan data continue to reflect some anxieties on the part of the consumer. For instance, the index for the current economic environment slipped a bit this month, down from 99.8 to 98.5, even as it represents an improvement from earlier in the year. Americans remain concerned about labor market and income growth, and this is likely responsible for the decline in the present figure. Geopolitical events might also play into this. Still, the future-oriented index rose strongly, up from 71.3 to 75.6, its highest level in over one year, suggesting more optimism moving forward.

We will get final data on September consumer sentiment from the University of Michigan on September 26. The Conference Board will also release its survey data on consumer confidence on September 30.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Monday Economic Report – September 2, 2014

Here is the summary for this week’s Monday Economic Report: 

Manufacturers continue to report improved activity in August. Last week, the Dallas, Kansas City and Richmond Federal Reserve Banks all noted expanding levels of new orders and production for the month, mirroring releases from the New York and Philadelphia Federal Reserve Banks in the prior weeks. These surveys reflect rebounds from earlier in the year, and perhaps more importantly, they suggest a mostly upbeat assessment in demand, output, hiring and capital spending over the next six months. At the same time, the Dallas and Kansas City studies showed some easing in growth rates in August, with the latter indicating that hiring had turned negative for the month. Exports also contracted in the Kansas City district, showing persistent international sales weaknesses in that region. The data illustrate that, even where we have seen progress, there are often some nagging challenges beneath the surface.

This same observation could be made about much of the other data released last week, too. For instance, new durable goods orders soared in July, up a whopping 22.6 percent. This represented an all-time high for the data series, but it was also largely the result of a jump in nondefense aircraft sales. Commercial airplane orders are choppy, with sales usually announced in batches. New durable goods orders have improved from earlier in the year. Outside of transportation, the manufacturing sector was weak in July. New durable goods orders excluding transportation fell 0.8 percent for the month. This suggests that the broader market for manufacturers was soft in July despite the sky-high headline figure.

Along those lines, the Conference Board reported that consumer confidence rose to its highest point since October 2007. This increase stemmed from improvements in views about the current economic environment. Yet, the Conference Board’s figures also suggested some lingering worries about employment and income growth. The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters’ report on consumer sentiment seems to focus even more on these anxieties. Even with a marginal increase in the August confidence measure, the University of Michigan data have not changed much this year, and respondents have had a diminished view of future growth over the past few months, not unlike what was seen in the Conference Board data. Geopolitical worries might be playing into these doubts. Either way, the confidence reports mirror other indicators, which show that consumers are cautious right now. Personal spending in July declined for the first time since January, consistent with other data showing flat retail sales.

Despite some softness in July, personal spending has increased at an annualized 4.1 percent over the past six months. Indeed, consumer and business spending were strengths during the second quarter, according to the latest revision of real GDP growth. The U.S. economy grew 4.2 percent at the annual rate during the second quarter, slightly better than the 4.0 percent original estimate and reflecting a rebound from the 2.1 percent decline in the first quarter. The biggest disappointment in the second quarter continued to be international trade figures, with net exports serving as a drag on growth. Moving forward, I estimate real GDP growth of roughly 3.0 percent during the second half of 2014. A number of risks abound, and business leaders and consumers remain tentative. If the first half of this year has taught us anything, it is an optimistic recovery can still be a fragile one.

This week, we will get additional insights regarding the health of the manufacturing sector. This morning, the Institute for Supply Management will release its August Purchasing Managers’ Index data for the sector. The ISM report found strong gains in demand, output and employment in July, and the August survey is expected to show another pickup in activity. Moreover, the Bureau of Labor Statistics will publish new jobs numbers on Friday. Manufacturers have added 15,000 workers on average each month since August 2013, with a 22,000 average from May to July of this year. Look for continued hiring growth for the sector in the August numbers that are at least consistent with the average of the past year. Other highlights this week include the latest data on construction spending, factory orders, international trade and productivity.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. 

personal spending - sept2014

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