Testifying at a House hearing Thursday, Vice President Wayne Morris of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) did an able job reporting the concerns of manufacturers about a new product safety complaint database being launched by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act.

Morris was a witness at the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Manufacturing and Trade’s hearing, “A Review of CPSIA and CPSC Resources.” (His prepared statement is here.) As AHAM’s news release summarizes:

AHAM’s testimony supports the creation of a public database and supports the funding necessary to properly execute this undertaking. However, it also AHAM’s viewpoint that the current design and operation of the web site decreases the quality and accuracy of information that will keep consumers safe, places unreasonable burdens on manufacturers, and does not require timely resolution of good faith material inaccuracy claims.

Manufacturers have proposed many ways to fix the database, Saferproducts.gov, as Morris made specific recommendations:

• Information should not be added to the public database while there is a pending claim of material inaccuracy.
• Eligible reporters to the database should be limited to those with first-hand information about the harm or with a relationship to the consumer – which, AHAM pointed out, was Congress’s intent.
• Registration of model or other descriptor information should be required where available. AHAM acknowledged that such information would be difficult to determine for some consumer products (such as rubber balls).

In her prepared statement, CPSC Commissioner Anne Northup called for Congress to enact two major changes to the way the commission does business, including modifications to improve the value of the product safety database. She testified that Congress, through the appropriations process, could immediately: (continue reading…)

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