The EPA has pursued an aggressive regulatory agenda, creating barriers for job creation, future investment and expanded operations by placing burdensome and costly rules on manufacturers.

Coal-fired power plants are the latest facilities to face EPA’s most recent round of regulations. Last week, one of the largest electricity providers, the American Electric Power Company announced that they will have to shutter five plants to comply with these absurd mandates.

Increasing the cost of energy and killing jobs won’t stimulate the economy or help reduce unemployment.

An editorial in today’s Wall Street Journal cuts right to the chase:

The agency estimates that the utility rule will cost $10.9 billion annually but will yield as much as $140 billion in total health and environmental benefits. Sounds like a deal. But most of those alleged benefits are indirect—i.e., not from the mercury reductions that the rule is supposed to be for. Rather, they come from pollutants (“airborne particles”) that the EPA already regulates under other parts of the Clean Air Act. A good analogy is a corporation double-counting revenue.

The Journal concludes that the EPA is imposing “willful damage” and “the least Congress can do is force the EPA to delay the final rule…though a better option would be to junk it.”

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