State of Manufacturing Tour Day 1 Part 2: Tampa, Florida Jay Timmons Opening Remarks

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Jay Timmons, President and CEO of The National Association of Manufacturers Delivers Opening Remarks From University of South Florida

January 28, 2016

Good evening. It’s great to be here in the Sunshine State in January.

It is a privilege to speak to educators and others working so hard to develop the talent this country relies on…and especially to address the students in this room who will soon be leading the U.S. economy forward. It’s good to see so many from the Muma College of Business and the College of Engineering.

I want to thank Dr. Stiling and the University of South Florida for hosting us. And I also want to thank Tom Feeney of Associated Industries of Florida for his partnership and tireless work on our tour…as well as Chris Hart of CareerSource Florida and Doug Bailey of Anheuser-Busch for being part of this important conversation. I’m here today to share with you the State of Manufacturing in the United States. Now, why manufacturing? It’s simple really. It’s because the strength of manufacturing in America is responsible for the success of America in the world. That is an indisputable fact. When manufacturing succeeds, America succeeds. That may sound counterintuitive to some, and it belies the picture some would like to paint: that manufacturing means things of the past—old, gritty factories, simple tools and rudimentary machines. If that’s the image the word “manufacturing” conjures in your mind, then come with me, ladies and gentlemen. It’s time to introduce you to modern manufacturing.

Today’s manufacturing is vastly different from yesterday’s. The National Association of Manufacturers has more than 14,000 member companies—from world-recognized brands to family-owned small businesses, and we are the voice of more than 12 million working men and women, their families and the communities they build. Just a quick look at some of our members’ work will show you: modern manufacturing touches every aspect of our lives. Innovative manufacturing is everywhere, across America and here in Florida. From Ryder System’s strides in alternative fuel solutions and energy efficiency……to the sustainable infrastructure developed by CSX. From Rayonier Advanced Materials’ development of high-value ethers that enable the development of slow-release medications……to Amgen or Bayer’s research and production of cancer-fighting and life-improving drugs.

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We’re talking about everything from the precision metal-formed parts produced by Hialeah Metal Spinning……to the vast, new world of the Internet of Things, where everyday objects are now digitally interconnected by the web. First it was our phones. Then it was our thermostats, our watches, our cars. Soon it will be everything from our contact lenses to our entire homes…from smart wallboard, to autonomous automobiles, to transcontinental pipelines. Companies like Jabil are making the “digital home” a reality. And thanks to companies like Honeywell, for example, you can control your home security and energy management with the touch of a button from around the world.

That’s the Internet of Things…and that’s modern manufacturing.

By the year 2020, 26 billion objects will be linked together by the Internet. Manufacturing is truly changing everything…and all these things are changing America and changing our lives. That’s why, today, manufacturing in the United States is leading an innovation revolution—a revolution that will win us jobs and restore our mantle of leadership around the world.

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The NAM State Of Manufacturing Tour Daily Wrap-Up: Stop 1 – New Hampshire

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Catch our daily wrap-up of the 2016 NAM State of Manufacturing Tour: Stop 1. New Hampshire

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Today kicked off our 2016 State of Manufacturing Tour! The tour is a series of speeches and events being held across the country in January and February to highlight the vital role that the industry plays in the U.S. economy and in changing perceptions of manufacturing.

The Tour began today at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. with an address from NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons. Timmons provided tremendous insights into how manufacturers continue to drive economic growth in the United States and how they are leading an innovation revolution that will win jobs for America, raise standards of living and restore our nation’s standing around the world!  In New Hampshire Timmons unveiled “Competing to Win: Manufacturers’ Agenda for Economic Growth and American Exceptionalism”—a roadmap to guide manufacturing voters and candidates as they navigate the upcoming elections.

We invite you to take a look at some of the key highlights from our first stop below! … And now on to Florida for stop 2!

Opening Remarks from NAM President and CEO, Jay Timmons

Behind the Scenes:

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FullSizeRenderIn the News: 

Another View — Jay Timmons: Manufacturing can build a better economy 

NAM Offers Blueprint to Bolster Manufacturing Competitiveness

Manufacturing head says industry will help environment, not government

Manufacturing leader takes pro-growth campaign outside the Beltway

On Social:

Sign Our Pledge To Stand With Manufacturing!

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SOM Tour Video Blog: US Senator Kelly Ayotte Discusses New Hampshire Manufacturing

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We’ve made our first stop on the State of Manufacturing Tour and sat down with U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte!

Senator Ayotte is our first in a series of State of Manufacturing Tour Video Guest Blogs! She was kind enough to share her thoughts on the challenges and opportunities for manufacturers in the Granite State and shares how she is working hard to help support New Hampshire Manufacturers and their workers, we invite you to check it out!

New Hampshire is the first stop on our State of Manufacturing Tour, and one of seven stops across the country over the next week to highlight the vital role the industry plays in the U.S. economy and the changing perceptions of manufacturing.

State of Manufacturing Tour, Manchester, N.H.: Jay Timmons’ Opening Remarks

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Jay Timmons, president and CEO of the National Association of Manufacturers, delivers opening remarks from the New Hampshire Institute of Politics during day one of the State of Manufacturing Tour.

Good morning. It’s great to be here in New Hampshire at this exciting time. The eyes of the nation, even the world, are on your first-in-the-nation primary.

With the steady stream of candidates passing through the doors of the Institute of Politics, the eyes of the world have also been on Saint Anselm. So what a privilege to join you.

Neil, thank you for welcoming us. And Jim, thank you for the introduction—and for your leadership for manufacturers and the business community here in New Hampshire.

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I’m grateful to have two NAM board members with us: Doug Starrett, president and CEO of the L.S. Starrett Company; and Don Welch, president of Globe Manufacturing Company.

Bill McCourt, president and CEO of the Rhode Island Manufacturers Association, thank you for coming—and for your partnership.

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I’m here today to share with you the State of Manufacturing in the United States. Why manufacturing? It’s simple really. It’s because the strength of manufacturing in America is responsible for the success of America in the world. That is an indisputable fact. When manufacturing succeeds, America succeeds.
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SOM Tour 2016: New Hampshire Is a Hotbed of Innovative Manufacturing

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A State of Manufacturing Tour guest blog post by Jim Roche, president of the Business & Industry Association, New Hampshire’s statewide Chamber of Commerce 

Today, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) kicked off its 2016 State of Manufacturing Tour in New Hampshire—and with good reason! New Hampshire is a hotbed of innovative manufacturing and home to the first-in-the-nation presidential primary less than two weeks from now.

Here at the Business & Industry Association (BIA) of New Hampshire, the NAM’s official affiliate in the Granite State, we fight every day for policies that support our manufacturers—our state’s most important job creators. We push state legislators, the governor, our congressional delegation and regulators for public policy and commonsense solutions that are friendly to job creators and promote prosperity for New Hampshire businesses.

At today’s stop, the NAM laid out several key public policies that will help put manufacturing in America on solid ground, including important ideas likjim rochee fixing our outdated tax code and upgrading old infrastructure to take us toward a more modern economy.

Today’s tour also highlighted the many ways manufacturers are changing our lives for the better. Manufacturing has grown well beyond the outdated images of mill and textile work, particularly in New England. Today, manufacturing leads in electronics, fabricated metals, machinery and technology. And manufacturing is connecting people across continents. The sector offers outstanding jobs and careers for nearly 68,000 New Hampshire workers. New Hampshire’s manufacturers export almost $4 billion of goods around the world every year, bringing new wealth and economic activity into our state’s economy.

As we move deeper into this important election season, manufacturing voters are asking candidates hard questions about how they will help America compete to win in a global economy. No matter the outcome of the election, we need policies that support today’s diverse and dynamic manufacturers. When manufacturing succeeds, we’re all better off.

 

United We Stand, Divided We Fall

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Last week, U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Tom Donohue delivered his State of American Business address. He spoke of the challenges and opportunities that businesses in the United States see on a daily basis, and he touched on a range of important policy issues. But he also brought up an important political concern: the type of troubling rhetoric we’re hearing in this year’s political campaign.

He observed, “[T]here are voices—sometimes very loud voices—who talk about walling off America from talent and trade and who are attacking whole groups of people based not on their conduct but on their ethnicity or religion.” Read More

Interior Reviews Coal Lease Program Leaving Manufacturers in Dust

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Friday, the Department of Interior announced it would develop new guidelines for development of coal resources on federal lands. Included in the announcement was a moratorium on new leases of coal on these federal lands until a new environmental impact study is completed. These studies take years, and Secretary Sally Jewell said the moratorium on new leases will be in place until the study is complete.

“Manufacturers need reliable energy sources and a robust energy mix, and this new plan from the president erodes our energy future. As the leading industry in cutting climate-related emissions, we understand and face the challenge, but manufacturers need to remain competitive in today’s global economy. The American energy boom has been beneficial to manufacturers, but this action by the administration will diminish that advantage.” – Ross Eisenberg, vice president of energy and resources policy, National Association of Manufacturers

As users of one-third of the nation’s energy, manufacturers need a robust energy strategy that looks at all forms of energy, conventional and unconventional, to ensure an affordable and reliable supply. A key to our increasing global competitiveness, in addition to continuing growth in productivity, is reliable and affordable energy. Coal still provides nearly 40 percent of our electricity and gives manufacturers an advantage in a local economy. Also concerning in this announcement is the failure to examine the costs to manufacturing and the millions of supply-chain jobs directly and indirectly impacted by such a sweeping action. Read More

Op-Ed: Strengthen Manufacturing, Strengthen Our Union

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On Tuesday night, President Obama will lay out his agenda for his last year in office. To unleash greater economic growth, to lift wages and to create more jobs in America will undoubtedly be among his goals. But if we want to achieve those goals, our focus should be on strengthening manufacturing in the United States.

Why manufacturing? Because the strength of manufacturing in America is directly responsible for the success of America in the world. When manufacturing succeeds, America succeeds.

More than 12 million people across the country work in this industry, which contributes more than $2 trillion to national GDP annually. If manufacturing in the United States represented a country, it would be the ninth-largest economy in the world.


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Why CES Is the Perfect Place to Talk TSCA Reform

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CES, produced by NAM member Consumer Technology Association (CTA), is the world’s largest technology and consumer electronics show. This event attracts thousands of participants and debuts the newest in consumer technology like robotics, self-driving cars, drones and personal sensory technologies. This year, included in that roster, is a panel exploring the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) reform.

The NAM’s Rachel Jones participated in this panel, discussing TSCA reform, how it affects state chemicals programs and what this means for industries like manufacturing, consumer electronics, toys and upstream chemicals.

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During the discussion, Jones highlighted why now is the time for TSCA reform and why this topic is perfect for CES.
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