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House Taxwriter Questions Use of IRS Funds to Hire “White Shoe” Law Firms

Manufacturers were glad to see House Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee Chair Peter Roskam (R-IL) today raise serious concerns at a hearing about the IRS’ use of outside law firms to question witnesses under oath in on-going audits and litigation. In conjunction with a hearing on the 2015 tax filing season, the Subcommittee issued a report, “Doing Less with Less: The IRS’s Spending Decisions Harm Taxpayers,”  which outlines a number of instances of IRS’ wasteful spending, all at the expense of American taxpayers. One of the worse cases described in the report is IRS’ decision to hire a team of high-priced attorneys to help out with an on-going case, at a cost of $2.1 million. (continue reading…)

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Don’t Be So Quick to Dismiss the Growth Potential of Tax Reform

For a number of years, manufacturers have been calling for an overhaul of our tax system, arguing that a simpler, fairer, more competitive and pro-investment tax system will unleash economic growth and the jobs that go with it. A study we released just last week backs this up.

A Missed Opportunity: the Economic Cost of Delaying Pro-Business Tax Reform, takes a close look at the economic impact of enacting a five-prong pro-business tax package that includes a maximum corporate tax rate of 25 percent; a globally competitive international tax system; full expensing for capital equipment; enhanced and permanent research and development incentives; and parallel changes for non-corporate pass-through businesses. (continue reading…)

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Comprehensive Tax Reform the True Solution to Broken System

The NAM continues to believe that recent M&A activity in the international arena strengthens the case for a comprehensive overhaul of the nation’s tax laws and the focus on regulatory fixes or targeted legislation is misplaced. While we will take a close look at the guidance released today by the Treasury department, comprehensive tax reform is essential to unleashing the economic growth we so badly need. The NAM will continue to ensure that Washington doesn’t change the discussion and keeps its focus where it belongs – on pro-growth, pro-competitiveness tax reform.

Dorothy Coleman is the Vice President of Tax and Domestic Economic Policy for the National Association of Manufacturers

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Revisionist—and Discriminatory—Tax Policy Is Not the Path to Economic Growth

Manufacturers in the United States were taken aback this weekend when word leaked out that the senior Senator from New York and long-time member of the Finance Committee –Chuck Schumer (D)—is floating a tax increase proposal that would actually reach back 20 years to discriminate against certain businesses that play a critical role in the U.S. economy. While it appears that the Senator’s goal is to discourage recent M&A activity in the international arena (aka inversions), the proposal would actually discourage important foreign direct investment in the United States and set a dangerous precedent for changing tax rules mid-stream, injecting even more uncertainly in our nation’s  shaky tax system.

Specifically, what Sen. Schumer’s proposal would do is significantly limit interest deductions for some non-U.S. domiciled companies that were headquartered in the United States at some point in the past 20 years. In laymen’s terms, this would be similar to limiting the deduction for a homeowner’s mortgage interest depending on where they were born. In both cases, it adds up to discriminatory tax policy. At the same time, adopting this revisionist approach to tax policy would open to door to similar proposals affecting other tax deductions and other groups of tax payers, and promulgating even more uncertainty in our uncertain times.

The proposal from Sen. Schumer seems to disregard the very important role that foreign direct investment plays in the U.S. economy and discriminates against non-U.S.-headquartered companies that play an important role in the U.S. economy. Indeed, U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies employ more than 2 million U.S. workers, over 17 percent of America’s manufacturing workforce. The ability to deduct interest expense is a critical factor in a company’s decision to invest and create jobs in the United States.

As we’ve noted many times before, the NAM believes that recent M&A activity highlights the critical need for a comprehensive overhaul of the U.S. tax system to reflect the global marketplace of the 21st century.  In short, the answer is comprehensive tax reform, not punitive tax treatment of foreign-owned companies.

Dorothy Coleman is the Vice President for Tax and Domestic Economic Policy at the National Association of Manufacturers. 

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Senator, You’re Aiming At the Wrong Target

The NAM believes that recent M&A activity in the international arena highlights the critical need for a comprehensive overhaul of the U.S. tax system to reflect the global marketplace of the 21st century. In short, the answer is comprehensive tax reform, not punitive tax treatment of foreign-owned companies or other “on-off” tax changes that have been floating around Washington this summer.

The latest proposal, unveiled yesterday by Senate Finance Committee member Chuck Schumer (D-NY), takes aim at interest deductions by non-U.S. headquartered companies. Unfortunately, Sen. Schumer’s proposal seems to disregard the very important role that foreign direct investment plays in the U.S. economy. Indeed, U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies employee more than 2 million U.S. workers, over 17 percent of America’s manufacturing workforce The ability to deduct interest expense is a critical factor in a company’s decision to invest and create jobs in the United States

Foreign investment is particularly important in U.S. manufacturing, where one in every seven U.S. manufacturing workers is employed by foreign-owned firms in the United States. These firms contributed $649.3 billion to the economy in 2010, the most recent year with data. Foreign affiliates are major exporters and, in fact, accounted for nearly 18 percent of America’s global exports.

Because of the importance of foreign direct investment to the U.S. economy, it is critical that policymakers avoid imposing discriminatory taxes on foreign-owned companies. Congress should focus on tax policies that attract and maintain more capital investment, rather than discourage it.

 

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And the Drumbeat for Tax Reform Continues….

You’ve certainly heard manufacturers call for a major overhaul of our nation’s tax code, particularly in light of recent M&A activity in the international arena. In a Washington Post op-ed on August 8, the Senate’s leading GOP taxwriter — Sen. Orrin Hatch from Utah—echoes that call.

In calling for an end to political posturing over the issue, Sen. Hatch concludes “ [T]he real solution would be to create a tax environment more favorable to businesses in this country.”

We agree with Sen. Hatch that the “problem demands much more focus than campaign talking points.” Tax reform won’t be easy but there’s no better time than now to get moving on a  21st century tax system for the United States.  Our trading partners have done it and so can we.

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How to Encourage Investment in the United States

Here at the NAM, we’re big proponents of a manufacturing comeback and one of our top priorities is to make the United States the best place in the world to manufacture and attract foreign direct investment. A pro-investment tax climate is key to achieving this goal and manufacturers are all for it.

On the other hand, we are increasingly concerned about “one-off” changes to the current tax code, like the anti-inversion proposals under discussion in Washington that will actually discourage investment in the United States, taking a toll on job creation and economic growth.

In today’s Wall Street Journal, John McKinnon takes a closer look at the potential negative impact of the anti-inversion legislation just on foreign direct investment in Firms Warn Inversion Crackdown Carries Risks. This is a big issue for the manufacturing sector—U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies employee more than 2 million U.S. workers, over 17 percent of America’s manufacturing workforce. As we’ve said many times before, we don’t need more tinkering with our broken tax code, what our country needs is a pro-growth, pro-competitive, fairer, simpler and predictable tax climate.

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Setting the Record Straight

There’s no doubt that the U.S. tax code— which includes the developed world’s highest corporate tax rate, outdated international tax rules and a host of temporary provisions—is a drag on economic growth and competitiveness. And while Manufacturers continue to push for comprehensive tax reform, NAM members recognize that, until that happens, we have to operate and compete under the current system. Unfortunately, that reality is being largely ignored in the current rhetoric flying around Washington about corporate inversions.

In today’s Wall Street Journal Miles White, the Chairman and CEO of Abbott Laboratories, sets the record straight on the realities of the U.S. tax system in his oped,  Ignoring the Facts on Corporate Inversions, and notes that legislation to block inversions would simply make a bad system worse. We agree strongly with Mr. White that piecemeal proposals to change the tax code will do more harm than good and the real solution is one Manufacturers have been pushing for all along, “fact-based, thoughtful, comprehensive [tax] reform.”

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Support the United States: Enact Comprehensive Tax Reform

Manufacturers in the United States have struggled to compete under our nation’s broken tax system for years so it’s natural that the NAM is a leader in calling for pro-growth, pro-competitive tax reform. Even though some say tax reform is “stalled” in Congress, NAM continues a constant drumbeat on the need to reform our nation’s tax code to bring us into the 21st century. Indeed, our voices are getting louder by the day as we see Washington policy makers drag their feet on reform or, worse yet,  suggest one-off changes to the tax code to address problems that would be eliminated entirely by overall reform.

While the NAM is a strong advocate for comprehensive reform of our current tax code, we also believe it is critically important to keep our current tax system in place until policymakers agree on a final reform plan. Piece-meal changes or repeal of long-standing rules will inject more uncertainty into business planning, making U.S companies even less competitive and threatening economic growth and U.S. jobs. A key objective for the association, as outlined in NAM’s “A Growth Agenda: Four Goals for a Manufacturing Resurgence in America,”[1]  is to create a national tax climate that promotes manufacturing in America and enhances the global competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers.  Manufacturers want the United States to be the best place in the world to manufacture and attract foreign direct investment. The way to do this is to enact a pro-growth, pro-competitive tax code

[1] Available at http://www.nam.org/

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Good News from Capitol Hill: the House Votes to Permanently Ban Taxes on the Internet

Amid persistent reports of historic gridlock in Washington, there was a brief flash of bipartisanship in the House this afternoon when representatives voted to permanently ban taxes on Internet access. Manufacturers know first hand that the Internet has become a critical piece of infrastructure in the United States and the 16-year ban on new state and local taxes on Internet access has helped spur the incredible amount of investment in broadband networks.

Unfortunately, this temporary moratorium will come to a halt in November 2014 unless Congress acts. Last month the House Judiciary Committee approved bipartisan legislation—the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act—which calls for a permanent moratorium on taxing Internet access. We applaud the House for coming together to advance the legislation.

Extending the moratorium will ensure continued robust broadband adoption and investment in the United States and promote competitiveness and job creation. Especially given our lackluster economy, the sooner Congress removes the tax threat the better. Let’s keep this bipartisanship rolling–next stop: the U.S. Senate!

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