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Amanda Wood

Canton Vote Shows Positive Culture and Collaboration at Nissan

By | General, Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Last week, employees at Nissan in Canton, Mississippi, sent a strong message by overwhelmingly deciding not to unionize. The campaign to unionize the Nissan employees lasted for months, but at the end of the day, the vote was clear and demonstrates that the positive culture and collaboration between employees and employers at Nissan should continue.

Nissan’s support of Mississippi’s manufacturing workers has helped the industry and the state’s economy grow again. Manufacturing in Mississippi now accounts for more than 143,000 jobs, with an annual compensation of more than $58,000. Manufacturing workers at the Nissan plant in Canton enjoy some of the highest wages, best benefits and most stable jobs in the state.

Nissan gives back to the community, donating more than $13.6 million to local charities and contributing more than 8,000 volunteer hours to more than 200 local organizations. Their investment in the facility has strengthened the county and state. The unemployment rate in Madison County is among the lowest in the state at 3.7 percent, while the region’s unemployment rate (5.3 percent) is less than the state average (6.6 percent) and the national average (5.5 percent).

The campaign is over, the vote has taken place, and now the decision of the employees should be respected so the employees and Nissan can continue on this path of success and good work for the Canton community.

House Moves to Fix Joint-Employer Standard

By | Human Resources, Regulations, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Today, we applaud the House Education and Workforce Subcommittee Chairman Bradley Byrne (R-AL), along with Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) and Congressmen Henry Cuellar (D-TX) and Luis Correa (D-CA) for introducing the Save Local Business Act, which undoes the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) 2015 unfavorable case decision in Browning-Ferris Industries (BFI). The Board, in BFI, overturned decades of case precedent on what constitutes a joint employer and significantly expanded the joint-employer standard to employers who exercise “indirect, potential or unexercised control” over another entity, overturning the old standard of “direct control.” The repercussion of this new standard has resulted in nearly two years of uncertainty among manufacturers as to whether or not their business relationships were at risk to new liabilities. The Save Local Business Act restores the 1984 standard and codifies it into the National Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act to prevent any future reversals.

The BFI case is just another example of uncertainty, which is unfortunately commonplace within today’s labor policy. Not only have stable and well-established policies been upset by new regulations, but the NLRB has also taken it upon itself to overturn decades of labor law precedent without any provocation or change that would necessitate it. Manufacturers are left, once again, in a state of the unknown, and rather than running their businesses and creating more jobs, employers are left with having to shift resources to deciphering the impact of these new policies.

As evidenced by the bipartisan bill introduced today, this is not a Republican or Democrat issue, but rather an employer issue that spans across the country to all industry sectors and impacts companies of all sizes. We thank Chairman Byrne and Chairwoman Foxx for their leadership on this and other labor issues and for their continued commitment to U.S. business owners to fix the problems created by misguided labor policies of the past eight years.

What’s Going on in Canton, Mississippi?

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Manufacturing workers at the Nissan plant in Canton, Mississippi, enjoy some of the highest wages, best benefits and most stable jobs in the state. Nissan gives back to the community—donating more than $13.6 million to local charities—and its investment in the facility has strengthened the city and state.

Now, outside interests want to disrupt this positive work environment and community relationship. The United Auto Workers (UAW) is pushing for dramatic changes at the plant—encouraging workers to cast votes on unionization without any real benefit and many downsides.

The National Association of Manufacturers’ partner organization in Mississippi, the Mississippi Manufacturers Association, lays out the details here. The future of manufacturing workers in Canton could be negatively impacted by the UAW’s actions. Everyone involved, especially the local community, should be concerned. If something isn’t broken, why is an outside group trying to fix it?

Manufacturers Agree: Joint-Employer Standard Could Hurt Entrepreneurship

By | Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Today, the House Small Business Subcommittee on Investigations, Oversight and Regulations held a hearing looking at the joint-employer standard and its impact on businesses. For months, the NAM has been at the forefront of efforts to push back against the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision in Browning-Ferris Industries, which created a new joint-employer standard in federal labor law.

This new standard turned 30 years of precedent on its head by stating that two companies are joint employers if the host employer has any indirect or potential control of the contracted entity’s employees. Previously, a company had to have actual or direct control over these employees. Read More

Another Attack on Federal Contractors

By | Labor Unions, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

This week, the administration hit federal contractors with a mandate it failed to achieve through congressional action—paid sick leave. This, unfortunately, seems to be the pattern, with a minimum wage mandate as well as the anticipated blacklisting regulation and guidance due out in April. When the administration is unsuccessful with Congress, it turns to the broad authority over federal contractors and pushes mandates onto the backs of those companies that produce essential products and services for the federal government.

For many years, the Healthy Families Act has come up as a proposal when both Democrats and Republicans have controlled Congress and has been repeatedly rejected. The concept has not, as the other side would have you think, been rejected because employers do not want to give their employees time off to care for themselves or their family.  Read More

Silica Rule Heads Towards Final Stage

By | Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Today, the proposed silica rule (reducing the occupational permissible exposure limit) will head to its final stage of review at the Office of Management and Budget and will likely become final during the early party of 2016—a long anticipated rule that is twelve years in the making.

We agree permissible exposure limits implemented in the early 1970s should be reviewed and revised, however, relying on outdated data from over a decade ago should not be the standard we expect from our government when issuing new regulations. The standard should be higher. Manufacturers have been concerned with the length of time this rule has taken to move forward—from submission of public comments to the final rule stage will be more than two years. The NAM first submitted comments in February 2014 and then testified at a public hearing in March 2014 and submitted its final brief before the record closed in August 2014.
Read More

Looking for Leadership on Labor Issues

By | Human Resources, Policy Experts, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

This year manufacturers have seen executive orders, proposed regulations and NLRB decisions in attempts to“fix” our labor system, but instead these actions have created more bureaucracy and hurdles for employers, employees and manufacturers. Last night, Congress unveiled a new spending agreement that included many key policy “riders.” In a missed opportunity to address key issues for manufacturers labor issues were largely left out of the deal.

As the year comes to a close, manufacturers urge lawmakers address these key labor issues in 2016: Read More

NAM Continues to Fight Harmful Joint-Employer Decision as Congress Takes Action

By | General, Shopfloor Main, Shopfloor Policy | No Comments

Since August, the NAM has been at the forefront of efforts to push back against the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) highly anticipated decision in Browning-Ferris Industries, which created a new “joint employer” standard in federal labor law. This new standard turned 30 years of precedent on its head by stating that two companies are joint employers if the host employer has any indirect or potential control of the contracted entity’s employees. Previously, a company had to have actual or direct control over these employees.

With the stroke of a pen, the NLRB disrupted the economic and business models that represent a modernized, 21st-century workplace that includes temporary contracts, subcontracting and other practices that allow businesses to focus on their core competencies, which are all critical tenets of modern manufacturing facilities. For manufacturers who use subcontractors for services, such as payroll, janitorial, food, security and law enforcement, hiring and temporary worker placement, just to name a few, they will now be subjected to this new standard. Read More

President Supports NLRB’s Ambush Election Rule

By | Human Resources, Labor Unions | No Comments

It comes as no surprise that, today, the President vetoed Congress’ disapproval of the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) “Ambush” Election Rule, finalized by the Board late last year and which goes into effect on April 14.

In the Memorandum accompanying the pocket veto (a veto occurring while Congress is adjourned), the President states that Congress’s Resolution of Disapproval would “block modest, but overdue reforms to simplify and streamline private sector union elections.” The word “streamline,” in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, means “to make simpler or more efficient.” However, when looking at the NLRB’s own data, I am confused as to what needs to be “made simpler or more efficient.”  Currently, in over 95 percent of election petitions filed, a union election is held in 60 days or less.  That is two months, which when you compare to our political campaign cycles, is merely a blink of an eye.  So what exactly needs to be streamlined with this process? Read More

Supreme Court To Consider Pregnancy Accommodation Case

By | Human Resources | No Comments

Tomorrow, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear the case Peggy Young v. United Parcel Services, Inc. where the Court will examine the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) and consider “whether, and in what circumstances, an employer that provides work accommodations to non-pregnant employees with work limitations must provide comparable work accommodations to pregnant employees.” Read More