FCC Takes Another Step Toward Restoring Internet Freedom

The members of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted today to continue their efforts to free the internet from regulation by moving forward on their “Restoring Internet Freedom” order (proceeding 17-108). The agency is now officially accepting public feedback on the decision. The NAM intends to file comments in support of ending the regulation of the internet. All of you who agree that over-regulation stifles private sector investment and innovation are encouraged to join us in sending that message. The deadline to make your voice heard is July 17.

When the FCC announced the decision a few weeks ago to consider this issue at their meeting today, we made the point then that internet-driven technology is now ubiquitous across all manufacturing sectors. We argued that our industry needs to see continued investment in our telecommunications infrastructure so we can maintain our global innovation leadership position that connectivity to the internet enables. The best way to ensure investment continues to flow is for Congress to act and create clear rules of the road. But today, the decision today by the FCC to begin the process to roll back a 1930’s era regulation will help facilitate that investment and support innovation in our sector.

It’s a timely coincidence that this FCC decision occurred during Infrastructure Week. Industries and individuals from across the country and political spectrum have rallied together and are calling on Washington to work together to address our infrastructure challenges. Broadband is part of manufacturing’s critical infrastructure and the biggest challenge it faces is government policies and regulations slowing its deployment. We encourage you to join the NAM and tell the FCC the time is now to free the internet from regulation and ensure our broadband infrastructure remains the best in the world.

 

Brian Raymond

Brian Raymond

Director of Innovation Policy at National Association of Manufacturers
Brian Raymond is the Director of Innovation Policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). He works with NAM members, the Administration and Congress to shape and advance pro-manufacturing positions on technology policy issues ranging from intellectual property protection, privacy issues and cyber/data security to net neutrality and R&D funding.
Brian Raymond

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