TPP in Real Life: TPP Helps California-Based Company Connect the Dots for Manufacturers

Manufacturers throughout the United States rely on a host of services companies to help assemble, package and deliver their products domestically and around the world.

One such company is ALOM, the global contract assembly, packaging and supply chain leader headquartered in the Silicon Valley city of Fremont, Calif. ALOM operates out of three U.S. locations that cover the North American market, and the company also provides services from 17 locations globally.

ALOM Headquarters in Fremont, California. Photo Courtesy: ALOM

ALOM headquarters in Fremont, Calif. Photo courtesy of ALOM.

ALOM procures, produces, configures and ships products for technology-rich companies in the automotive, medical, telecommunications, technology, energy/utility and other regulated industries. ALOM’s customers include Fortune 100 companies, and it is part of a $750 billion ecosystem. On the supplier side, the ecosystem includes numerous small suppliers, including many veteran- and women-owned businesses, such as Container Consulting Service Inc., which provides customized packaging containers, and Superior Group, which provides contract labor.

While ALOM’s customers successfully manufacture and sell products within the United States, many also export to markets around the world. ALOM and its customers benefit from trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that eliminate tariff and non-tariff barriers, set strong rules that prohibit government restrictions on the movement of data and the localization of information technology infrastructure and make it easier to ship products due to more transparent and streamlined customs rules.

ALOM’s Global Footprint. Image Courtesy: ALOM

ALOM’s global footprint. Image courtesy of ALOM.

ALOM President and CEO Hannah Kain says that “TPP will aid ALOM in expanding our business into more TPP countriesbeyond our growing businesses in places like Australia, Canada and Mexicoin turn enabling ALOM to support more jobs here in the United States.”

Ms. Kain adds that “without quick access to high-quality, competitively priced components, and the ability of our customers to access markets overseas, ALOM would have a hard time competing.” Ratification of trade agreements like the TPP will be critical as companies like ALOM seek to grow and expand their manufacturing-supporting businesses in the years ahead.

Ken Monahan

Ken Monahan

Director for International Trade Policy at National Association of Manufacturers
Ken Monahan is the Director for International Trade Policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), where he works with NAM member companies to develop and advocate the association’s positions and priorities on trade agreement negotiations, ensure enforcement of existing trade agreement commitments, and other issues including the World Trade Organization (WTO), miscellaneous tariff bills, data flows and privacy, conflict minerals, forced localization, and other bilateral country trade matters (e.g., Colombia, South Korea, and the European Union and its member states). Mr. Monahan has on-the-ground experience negotiating trade agreements, having worked at the U.S. Department of Commerce on the WTO Doha Round negotiations, the U.S.-Korea free trade agreement and other international trade matters.
Ken Monahan

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