Texas Court Halts Blacklisting Rule

Yesterday, Judge Marcia A. Crone of the Eastern District of Texas granted a nationwide injunction for the majority of the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces regulation, otherwise known as “blacklisting.” The order states that business groups “properly demonstrated immediate and ongoing injury to their members if the rule is allowed to take effect,” adding that based on the National Association of Manufacturers conflict minerals disclosure lawsuit against the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Blacklisting Order was also likely a “compelled public reporting requirement violating the First Amendment.”

The regulation, finalized in August, places extensive and burdensome new reporting requirements on federal contractors in an attempt to achieve broad and sweeping labor law reforms, and it would have gone into effect today if the judge had not ruled. The only area where the preliminary injunction was not granted is the January 1, 2017, Paycheck Transparency provision, which, upon implementation, would require contractors and subcontractors to provide employees with documentation of regular and overtime hours worked, pay and additions to or deductions from pay that are not currently included in employee paychecks. The decision strongly affirms the arguments related to the First Amendment, due process, constitutional, arbitrary and capricious concerns and others raised in the complaint.

This regulation arises out of the executive branch’s attempt to parlay the federal government’s limited proprietary authority over the procurement of government contracts into a regulatory tool designed to achieve broad and sweeping labor-law reforms. Implementation for prime contractors was set to begin on October 25, 2016, for contracts of $50 million or more and requires reporting of one prior year of labor law violations. The threshold for contract size drops to $500,000 on April 25, 2017. The reporting period extends to the three prior years of labor law violations starting on October 25, 2018. Covered disclosures of labor law violations include civil judgments, administrative merits determinations and arbitral awards, including those that are not final or still subject to court review. The number and severity of the alleged and proven violations will be a factor in the awarding of contracts, affecting thousands of manufacturers.

The judge ruled that the First Amendment claim will likely be successful on the merits based on the courts logic in NAM v. SEC (D.C. Cir. 2014). Specifically, the court stated, “The Executive Order, FAR Rule and DOL Guidance share the same constitutional defect as the conflict minerals rule in NAM, only more so. The Order, Rule and Guidance compel government contractors to ‘publicly condemn’ themselves by stating that they have violated one or more labor or employment laws. The reports must be filed with regard to merely alleged violations, which the contractor may be vigorously contesting or has instead chosen to settle without an admission of guilt, and, therefore, without a hearing or final adjudication.” The appeals court in NAM “further took issue with the government’s attempt to force companies to ‘stigmatize’ themselves by filing the required reports, stating, ‘Requiring a company to publicly condemn itself is undoubtedly a more ‘effective’ way for the government to stigmatize and shape behavior than for the government to have to convey its views itself, but that makes the requirement more constitutionally offensive, not less so.

Manufacturers are pleased that Judge Crone enjoined the implementation of this regulation that would have far-reaching negative impacts on companies with federal contracts. The NAM will continue fighting for manufacturers in the courts to turn back the growing wave of federal regulations that hamper growth.

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Leland Frost

Associate General Counsel at National Association of Manufacturers
Leland Frost is the Associate General Counsel at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). As part of the Manufacturers' Center for Legal Action, Mr. Frost works to strengthen the NAM's ability to promote manufacturing policy objectives through litigation. Mr. Frost's background includes international, environmental and corporate law experience and work on a wide range of policy and regulatory issues.
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