Survey Says… Section 179 and Bonus Depreciation Are Critical

By June 9, 2014Taxation

In the latest NAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufacturers that was released earlier this morning survey respondents once again underscore the importance of investment incentives like enhanced Section 179 expensing and bonus depreciation and the role that these common-sense provisions play in their firms’ investment decisions. According to the survey, nearly a quarter of respondents said that “they were holding off on making investments until Congress extends Section 179 expensing or first-year bonus depreciation.”

If these provisions were not expensed, over a third of respondents “said that they would not make any investments this year without these provisions.” That would be on top of the 5 percent of respondents that said that they were not planning on making any investment this year at all. As NAM’s Chief Economist Chad Moutray puts it in the survey analysis, “that is a significant portion of businesses that would be negatively impacted by the loss of these investment incentives.

And in a pre-emptive response to those who say that the economy can still benefit when Congress gets around to passing the extenders in the 11th hour during the likely lame duck session later this year, this survey also underscores that the sooner Congress acts to restore these provisions the better. In fact according to our survey, “more than half of those surveyed said there would not be enough time to make capital spending purchases and put these capital expenditures into place if these incentives are not extended until mid-November.”

This survey makes it all the more clear that the House of Representatives should overwhelmingly support the passage of H.R. 4457, America’s Small Business Tax Relief Act later this week. Manufacturers of all sizes need this action and they need it now!

Carolyn Lee

Carolyn Lee

Executive Director of The Manufacturing Institute at The Manufacturing Institute
Carolyn Lee is Executive Director of The Manufacturing Institute, the non-profit affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), the nation’s largest industrial trade association. Carolyn drives an agenda focused on improving the manufacturing industry through its three centers: the Center for the American Workforce, the Center for Manufacturing Research, and the Center for Best Practices.

In her role, Carolyn leads the Institute’s workforce efforts to close the skills gap and inspire all Americans to enter the U.S. manufacturing workforce, focusing on women, youth, and veterans. Carolyn steers the Institute’s initiatives and programs to educate the public on manufacturing careers, improve the quality of manufacturing education, engage, develop and retain key members of the workforce, and identify and document best practices. In addition, Carolyn drives the agenda for the Center for Manufacturing Research, which partners with leading consulting firms in the country. The Institute studies the critical issues facing manufacturing and then applies that research to develop and identify solutions that are implemented by companies, schools, governments, and organizations across the country.

Prior to joining the Institute, Carolyn was Senior Director of Tax Policy at the NAM beginning in 2011, where she was responsible for key portions of the NAM’s tax portfolio representing the manufacturing community on Capitol Hill and in the business community and working closely with the NAM membership. She served as the Director of Legislative and Government Affairs at the Telecommunications Industry Association, Manager of State and Federal Government Affairs for 3M Company, and in various positions on Capitol Hill including as Legislative Director for former U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME), and as a senior legislative staff member for former U.S. Rep. Sue Kelly (R-NY).

Carolyn is a graduate of Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania graduating with a B.A. in Political Science. She resides in Northern Virginia with her husband and three children.
Carolyn Lee

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