Revolving Credit Declined for the Second Straight Month in February

By April 7, 2014Economy

The Federal Reserve Board said that U.S. consumer credit outstanding rose 6.4 percent in February. Total consumer credit was $3.130 trillion, with $854.2 billion in revolving credit and $2.275 trillion in nonrevolving credit.

Over the course of the past 12 months, consumer credit has risen 5.6 percent, but that tells only part of the story. Nonrevolving credit, which includes auto and student loans, increased 7.7 percent over that time frame. However, revolving credit, which includes credit cards and other lines of credit, was up just 0.5 percent. In general, it suggests that Americans have been hesitant to use their credit cards when making purchases since the recession. Along those lines, revolving loans have declined in the first two months of 2014, down 0.3 percent from $856.8 billion in December.

Overall, growth in consumer credit has stemmed largely from increases in nonrevolving debt, especially for auto and student loans. For instance, student and motor vehicle loans increased 8.3 percent and 8.5 percent, respectively, using non-seasonally adjusted data in 2013.

Chad Moutray  is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers.

Chad Moutray

Chad Moutray

Chad Moutray is chief economist for the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), where he serves as the NAM’s economic forecaster and spokesperson on economic issues. He frequently comments on current economic conditions for manufacturers through professional presentations and media interviews. He has appeared on Bloomberg, CNBC, C-SPAN, Fox Business and Fox News, among other news outlets.
Chad Moutray

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