Monday Economic Report – April 14, 2014

By April 14, 2014Economy

Here is a summary of this week’s Monday Economic Report:

In the minutes of its March Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting, the Federal Reserve Board highlighted the negative impact of weather events on first-quarter growth. Winter storms hampered business investment, construction, consumer spending and manufacturing production. Nonetheless, the Federal Reserve still anticipates real GDP growth of between 2.8 and 3.0 percent in 2014, faster than last year’s 1.9 percent expansion. While this reflects a slight downgrade in the outlook for the year from the last forecast, it continues to suggest that the economy will regain its momentum moving forward. The Federal Reserve also predicts growth of 3.0 to 3.2 percent in 2015. The International Monetary Fund’s World Economic Outlook, which was released last week, mirrors these figures in its own forecasts for the United States.

The highlight of the FOMC minutes was the background discussion among participants regarding future monetary policy actions. The Federal Reserve largely feels that the U.S. labor market has a lot of “slack” in it, which is not reflected by the 6.7 percent unemployment rate. Despite improvements in the unemployment rate, weaknesses continue, with the participation rate near 30-year lows and high rates of both underemployment and part-time employment. While some FOMC members feel there has been sufficient economic progress to warrant less stimulative monetary policy measures, the majority view the current labor market as sufficiently weak enough to continue the Federal Reserve’s highly accommodative actions for the foreseeable future. The Federal Reserve will continue to reduce its long-term asset purchases, but short-term interest rates will likely not rise until next year at the earliest. Inflationary pressures remain modest, providing the Federal Reserve with some wiggle room to do its stimulative measures.

The most recent Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) data suggest the labor market for manufacturers remains soft. The number of manufacturing job openings declined for the third month in a row in February. Postings have been lower since peaking in November, and the December to February time frame mirrored the weather-related weaknesses seen in other data. Net hiring was also lower in those three months, with 2,000 more separations than hires in February. Still, the manufacturing sector has added an average of 12,125 workers each month since August, mirroring the uptick in demand and production that we have seen since that point. We are hopeful that hiring begins to accelerate again in the coming months.

Looking at the sentiment surveys last week, businesses and consumers were more upbeat. The California Manufacturing Survey from Chapman University reported rising expectations for new orders and production for the second quarter, but with employment growth remaining soft. Both durable and nondurable goods activity were anticipated to expand modestly in the current quarter. Likewise, small business owners in the National Federation of Independent Business’ (NFIB) survey were more optimistic about future sales, and those saying the next three months were a good time to expand edged marginally higher. Still, earnings remained weak, and the percentage suggesting they would bring on more workers moved lower. The University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters also noted improved consumer sentiment, a welcome gain after three months of dampened enthusiasm.

This week will be a busy one on the economic front, specifically with new reports on housing starts and industrial production. We hope to move beyond the weather-related weaknesses from earlier this year, and March’s manufacturing output numbers are expected to show a continued rebound. Similarly, housing starts moved slightly higher in February, but permits surpassed the 1 million mark for the first time since November; yet, rising interest rates, financial challenges for potential buyers and low inventory remain concerns. Other highlights this week include new data on consumer prices, leading indicators, manufacturing surveys from the New York and Philadelphia Federal Reserve Banks and state employment.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers. Note that General Electric Chief Economist Marco Annunziata will prepare the Monday Economic Report for April 21.

participation rate - apr2014

Chad Moutray

Chad Moutray

Chad Moutray is chief economist for the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), where he serves as the NAM’s economic forecaster and spokesperson on economic issues. He frequently comments on current economic conditions for manufacturers through professional presentations and media interviews. He has appeared on Bloomberg, CNBC, C-SPAN, Fox Business and Fox News, among other news outlets.
Chad Moutray

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