H-1B Visa Petition Period Open For a Grand Total of One Week

Yesterday, US Customs and Immigration Service announced that it had received more than enough H-1B petitions to reach the cap for FY 2015. At this point all submitted petitions will be placed in a lottery to determine which are accepted. As the USCIS announcement states, “A computer-generated process will randomly select the number of petitions needed to meet the caps…” Computers, not the employers in need of the workers, are randomly deciding who should design, build and manufacturer tomorrow’s products. Unless we address immigration reform we are driving our innovators to leave the United States.

Every day, foreign-born innovators that are already legally in the United States sit in limbo, waiting up to 10 year for their green card. These valuable employees cannot be promoted or change companies for fear of being forced to start all over again at the back of a 10 year process.  This cycle needs to stop. Manufacturers need access to a skilled workforce and need to know we can hire and promote the right person for the job – not play the job lottery.

Reform of the legal immigration system is necessary for US manufacturing to succeed. The uncertainty associated with a random lottery is counterproductive to economic growth. Manufacturers want to create jobs here in the US, not drive them abroad. Gambling our future on the Federal government drawing the right person is not a sound strategy for our economy.

Christine Scullion

Christine Scullion

Director of Human Resources Policy at National Association of Manufacturers
Christine Scullion is the director of human resources policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). Mrs. Scullion  oversees the NAM’s human resources policy work and has expertise on issues ranging from health care, immigration, workforce and education issues and the federal rulemaking process.  Mrs. Scullion’ s background includes policy and government relations experience on a range key health care, immigration and workforce issues. Mrs. Scullion received her MBA from the Rutgers and undergraduate degree from Penn State University.
Christine Scullion

Latest posts by Christine Scullion (see all)

Leave a Reply