House to Vote on Bill to Improve EPA Greenhouse Gas Regulations

By March 3, 2014Economy, Energy

This week, the House will vote on H.R. 3826, the “Electricity Security and Affordability Act.” The NAM strongly supports this bill, which I testified in support of back in November, and which the Partnership for a Better Energy Future, a coalition of roughly 100 business and labor organizations, recently showed ts support for. H.R. 3826 would would place some reasonable limits on EPA’s new greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations and get us back to an all-of-the-above energy strategy.

Recently, the EPA proposed a GHG regulation for new power plants that would greatly limit the sources of energy available to power U.S. manufacturing. The first of several coming GHG regulations, this rule would effectively ban the construction of new coal-fired power plants in the United States by requiring them to be equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) systems. While CCS is a very promising technology, it is too expensive and is not in use at a single commercial-scale power plant in the country. To remain competitive in a global economy, manufacturers need an “all-of-the-above” energy strategy to ensure they have access to affordable and reliable energy.

If the EPA continues down this regulatory path, it will lead to even greater uncertainty and costs for U.S. manufacturers as we wait for the next similar regulations. It’s time for the EPA to consider a more reasonable path forward. H.R. 3826 would do that by drawing some clear lines around what EPA can and cannot do as it crafts these regulations.

To help ensure manufacturers have continued access to safe, reliable and low-cost energy, click here to contact your Representative and ask them to support H.R. 3826.

Click here to Take Action Now!

Ross Eisenberg

Ross Eisenberg

Ross Eisenberg is vice president of energy and resources policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). Mr. Eisenberg oversees the NAM’s energy and environmental policy work and has expertise on issues ranging from energy production and use to air and water quality, climate change, energy efficiency and environmental regulation. He is a key voice for manufacturing on Capitol Hill, at federal agencies and across all forms of media.
Ross Eisenberg

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