The Consumer Confidence Index from the Conference Board rose from 61.9 in March to 68.1 in April. This brings the index essentially back to where it was in February, when it stood at 68.0, but it is below the 73.1 reading observed in October. In short, sentiment appears to have improved of late, even as it is not quite where we would like for it to be. This is largely consistent with a similar survey from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters, which was released last week.

Noting this month’s improvement, Lynn Franco, the Director of Economic Indicators at the Conference Board, cautioned that “… consumers’ confidence has been challenged several times over the past few months by such events as the fiscal cliff, the payroll tax hike and the sequester. Thus, while expectations appear to have bounced back, it is too soon to tell if confidence is actually on the mend.”

Specifically, the Conference Board noted that opinions about the current and future economy have advanced in April, with the largest gain seen in the forward-looking measure. The expectations component of the index rose from 63.7 to 73.3 for the month, above the level seen in February (72.4). With that said, Americans remain largely frustrated with the labor market, with a net increase in the percentage of those who feel that jobs are hard to get.

The importance of these types of surveys, of course, is how they translate into consumer spending patterns. Yesterday, we learned that retail sales growth eased in March, with higher payroll taxes and persistent anxieties slowing purchases. The Conference Board’s survey found that some of this uneasiness continued into its respondents’ buying plans. The percentage of those planning to purchase autos and appliances were down slightly; whereas, home buying intentions were unchanged.

Chad Moutray is the chief economist, National Association of Manufacturers.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)