Gov. Scott Walker and the Wisconsin Legislature have led the way in 2011 in improving their state’s business climate by enacting a major civil justice reform package, but other states are aggressively following the same pro-jobs, pro-investment path. Sherman “Tiger” Joyce of the American Tort Reform Association reports promising developments in major states around the country in a piece in Metropolitan Corporate Counsel, Prospects for Tort Reform Strong in Many States.

Despite the shellacking its candidates took in last November’s elections, the nation’s always-formidable lawsuit industry remains optimistic about advancing its liability-expanding agenda here in Washington. What the new House majority may prevent plaintiffs bar lobbyists from achieving legislatively, they expect to achieve administratively through the regulatory agencies of the executive branch.

In state capitals across the country, however, personal injury lawyers have good reason to be concerned about their prospects. With the party that they staunchly support suddenly in a weaker collective position in state legislatures and governors’ mansions than it has been in for many decades, trial lawyers’ legislative strategy will, by necessity, become one largely of defense, as opposed to offense

He focuses on Oklahoma, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, Texas and New Jersey.

ATRA keeps track of the latest trial lawyer excesses and predations at its new website www.judicialhellholes.org. Highly recommended.

In related news, The Torts Prof blog does a nice Q&A with Victor Schwartz of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, ATRA’s general counsel and an expert on torts with whom the National Association of Manufacturers often works.

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