Vermont, Soon to be Even Colder in the Winters

By April 16, 2010Energy

USA TODAY, “In Vermont, nuke power faces a test“:

On Feb. 24, the state Senate voted 26-4 to close 38-year-old Vermont Yankee when its license expires in two years, even though it employs 640 people; pays $16.5 million a year in state and local taxes; provides one-third of Vermont’s power, and helps make the state’s carbon footprint the region’s smallest.

So will Vermonters take the necessary steps to reduce their electricial consumption by one-third, including the concomitant decline in economy activity in the state?

A nuclear renaissance has long been advocated by some political conservatives, such as former senator Pete Domenici, R-N.M., and business groups such as the National Association of Manufacturers. Because atomic energy produces much less carbon pollution than fuels such as coal, they’ve been joined by some environmentalists (early Greenpeace organizer Patrick Moore, Whole Earth Catalog editor Stewart Brand) and some more liberal politicians (Obama and Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass.).

It’s a good package from USA TODAY, with maps and charts, and the story notes that the Vermont Yankee plant is not representatives of the nuclear industry and the coming nuclear renaissance.

Join the discussion One Comment

  • VTDad says:

    “So will Vermonters take the necessary steps to reduce their electricial [sic] consumption by one-third, including the concomitant decline in economy activity in the state?” Vermont Yankee, designed during the Johnson Administration, is the last of the Yankee plants to retire. Just as the lights stayed on in our neighboring New England states when their aging reactors retired, so too will ours. And Vermont’s utilities are snapping up power purchase agreements at very favorable terms because the market is glutted. We’ll do fine after the reactor retires as scheduled in 2012.

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