Hugh Hewitt, the radio talk show host, blogger, law professor and all-around good guy, on Monday interviewed Commissioner Anne Northup of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the transcript of the conversation is now up at HughHewitt.com.

Hugh accurately expresses the astonishment and frustration of business people in trying to figure out and respond to the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), and Northup, a former Republican member of Congress, confirms that the law is excessive, complicated and disconnected from reality. The discussion of lead content is good, and we appreciate her reaction to efforts now under way in Congress to “fix” the CPSIA.

HH: And the regulatory burden, I know, because many of them are our clients, people don’t know how to interpret this. They write in, they have to hire expensive lawyers to go get exemptions from you. It must be a morass at the building.

AN: Well, and we’re not giving any exemptions. So far, there hasn’t been a vote to give exemptions. And so they’re trapped in figuring out how they’re going to make this. And you know, I think there’s the ATV, the bicycle people, I mean, who sucks on their bicycle handlebars at six years old? And you know, even if you did, you couldn’t swallow enough lead that it would register a change in your blood lead level.

HH: And Congress won’t fix it. I saw Chairman Waxman has proposed an amendment on your blog, and your blog has dissected it. It’s not really that helpful. In fact, it might make things worse.

AN: It really isn’t helpful. It’s really meant to solve the political problem he has from the ATV people. They obviously are very organized. It’s very serious for them. They have children’s, smaller ones that are safer for children, and they’ve had to take them off the market. But you know, I mean, it has all these hoops you have to jump through. You have to prove that you can’t make it officially, you can’t make it, that it’s not practical, that there’s no substitute material, you have to say how you’re going to get into compliance over the next few years, you have to prove…here’s what’s funny. I think the third qualification is you have to prove that it doesn’t harm the health or safety of a child. Well Hugh, if it doesn’t harm the health or safety of a child, why are we even regulating it? What else do we have to prove?

The conversation occurred at a meeting of the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association. Hewitt also addresses a topic we’ve broached before: If Congress can’t get the CPSIA right, how can it expect to restructure the entire U.S. health care and insurance system?

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