CPSIA Update: CPSC Gets Bigger…Better? That’s Another Question

By March 13, 2009Regulations

The 2009 Omnibus Appropriations bill just signed into law by President Obama increases funding for the Consumer Product Safety Commission. From House Appropriations Chairman Obey’s executive summary of H.R. 1105:

Consumer Product Safety Commission

SALARIES AND EXPENSES

The bill provides $105,404,000 for the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). After years of budget cuts and staffing decline, Congress is providing the CPSC the additional resources it needs to substantially improve its product safety activities. CPSC will be expected to use this infusion of resources consistent with recently-enacted legislation to enhance efforts to keep unsafe products out of the marketplace.

Of the amount provided, $17,098,000 is estimated for new responsibilities and requirements set by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, including the development of a consumer product safety database; and $7,138,000 is estimated for activities under the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. Funds are also available within the amount provided to assign a Regional Product Safety Officer and one locally-employed staff position to the United States embassy in Beijing, China. This will better enable the CPSC to aggressively promote compliance with U.S. product safety standards, requirements, and expectations by Chinese and other Asian governments, manufacturers, and exporters.

Also included is $412,000 for three additional positions to support the Inspector General of the CPSC. This includes two auditors and one administrative officer.

The CPSC is directed to consider promulgating regulations that require cribs to be durability-tested and contain warning labels against the use of soft bedding.

The CPSC is urged to increase its capacity for screening consumer products for lead content as those products arrive at ports of entry, including through the use of innovative technologies that enable fast and accurate on-site analysis of lead content.

During the 2008 debate on the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, the NAM supported a bigger budget for the CPSC to help manage existing enforcement.

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