With Senator Joseph Biden (D-DE) being Sen. Barack Obama’s choice as vice presidential nominee, we take a look at the NAM’s “Key Vote” tabulations, the ranking of each member of Congress on positions taken on measures identified by the National Association of Manufacturers as important to the manufacturing economy.

The full listing of Sen. Biden’s votes is here. Percentages:

110th Congress (2007-2008): 11% — unofficial
109th Congress (2005-2006): 11%
108th Congress (2003-2004): 18%
107th Congress (2001-2002): 0%
106th Congress (1999-2000): 29%
105th Congress (1997-1998): 38%

Record on legal votes, 106th-109th Congress: 0%
Record on energy votes, 106th-109th Congress: 18%

We’ve put the full table of votes in the extended entry below.

Delaware U.S. Senate
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Photo Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D)
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110th Congress – Senate Voting Records (unofficial)
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Rejecting Counterproductive Security Mandates. Vote on a motion to table, or defeat, a Schumer (D-NY) amendment to homeland security bill S. 4 that would have required 100 percent scanning of all inbound sea containers. Tabling motion was approved, and the amendment rejected, by a vote of 58-38 on March 1, 2007 (Roll No. 56). The NAM supported the tabling motion and opposed the amendment, which was not feasible given the current technology. The amendment would have levied counterproductive federal mandates on industry, caused massive delays and disruptions in the global supply chain, and ultimately cost American jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Medicare Prescription Price Negotiations. Vote on a procedural motion to debate S. 3, legislation that would allow the government to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical manufacturers on behalf of Medicare beneficiaries. Vote was 55-42, 5 votes shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on April 18, 2007 (Roll 132). The NAM opposed the procedural motion and the legislation. Under the current system, private-sector negotiations between insurers and manufacturers have driven down Medicare Part D premiums from $32 to $24, while a one-size-fits-all government solution could result in higher prices, fewer available drugs for retirees and less funding for R&D of new, life-saving drugs. NAM POSITION: No. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Energy Taxes and Renewable Tax Credits. Vote on a procedural motion to limit debate and move to final passage of a $32 billion energy tax package. The legislation included renewal of NAM-supported energy efficiency and renewable energy tax credits but also would have imposed more than $30 billion of taxes on the domestic oil and gas industry. Vote was 57-36, 3 votes shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on June 21, 2007 (Roll No. 223). The NAM opposed the cloture motion, noting that it would discourage new oil and gas investments in the United States and likely result in higher energy costs for U.S. manufacturers. NAM POSITION: No. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Eliminating Secret Ballot Elections in the Workplace. Vote on a procedural motion to debate H.R. 800, the so-called “Employee Free Choice Act.” Vote was 51-48, 9 votes short of the 60 votes required under Senate rules, on June 26, 2007 (Roll No. 227). The NAM vigorously opposed the procedural motion and the bill, which would strip away the right of American workers to vote via federally supervised, secret ballot elections when deciding whether to unionize. NAM POSITION: No. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
U.S.-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement. Vote on legislation implementing the U.S.-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement. Approved 77-18 on Dec. 4, 2007 (Roll No. 413). The NAM supported the trade agreement, which would eliminate nearly all of Peru’s tariffs on U.S. goods, increase protection of American investments, strengthen U.S. intellectual property rights and reduce non-tariff and regulatory barriers in Peru. NAM POSITION: Yes. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. Y -
Energy Taxes, Renewable Tax Credits and Electricity Mandates. Vote on a procedural motion to limit debate and move to final passage of the House Amendments to the Senate version of H.R. 6. The legislation included renewal of NAM-supported energy efficiency and renewable energy tax credits but also would have imposed an unworkable federal renewable electricity mandate and levied billions of dollars of taxes on the domestic oil and gas industry. Vote was 53-42, 7 votes shy of the 60 needed under procedural rules, on Dec. 7, 2007 (Roll No. 416). The NAM opposed the cloture motion and the underlying bill, which would have resulted in higher energy costs for most manufacturers. NAM POSITION: No. Click here to access the NAM’s key vote letter. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the Ensign-Cantwell clean energy tax amendment to the Senate housing stimulus package. Approved 88-8 on April 10, 2008 (Roll No. 95). The NAM supported the amendment, which would extend incentives for clean and renewable energy that are set to expire at the end of 2008. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Vote on a procedural motion to limit debate on H.R. 2831, the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Vote was 56-42, 4 shy of the 60 votes required under Senate rules to limit debate, on April 23, 2008 (Roll No. 110). Majority Leader Reid, a bill supporter, voted “no” to preserve his procedural right to call for a second vote on the bill. The NAM opposed the procedural motion and the underlying bill, which would have significantly expanded employers’ exposure to pay discrimination claims under civil rights laws. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the McConnell (R-KY) energy supply amendment to flood insurance bill S. 2284. Rejected 56-42 on May 13, 2008 (Roll No. 123). The NAM supported the amendment, which would have begun to address U.S. energy supply needs by permitting environmentally safe energy development in the Outer Continental Shelf and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, encouraged increase refinery capacity and encouraged commercial leasing of oil shale on federal lands. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a procedural (cloture) motion on the Boxer Substitute to S. 3036, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act. Vote was 48-36, 12 shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on June 6, 2008 (Roll No. 145). The NAM opposed the procedural motion and the underlying bill, which would have resulted in millions of U.S. job losses, reductions in GDP and household income for most Americans and higher energy prices. NAM POSITION: No. N -
Vote on a procedural Motion to Proceed to debate energy bill S. 3044. Vote was 51-43, 9 shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on June 10, 2008 (Roll No. 146). The NAM opposed the procedural motion and the underlying bill, which included: billions of dollars in new taxes on the domestic oil/gas industry; price controls/gouging language that would interfere with normal market forces; and ill-advised changes to U.S. antitrust law. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 11%
NAM’s Official 109th Congress Voting Record (Senate)
Lawmakers scoring 70 percent or higher on Key Manufacturing Votes in the 109th Congress receive the NAM Award for Manufacturing Legislative Excellence.
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Class Action Reform (S. 5) Vote on S. 5, the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005. Approved 72-26 on Feb. 10, 2005 (Roll No. 9). The NAM supported the legislation, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. Signed into law (P.L. 109-2) on Feb. 18, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Prohibiting Oil/Gas Exploration in ANWR (Cantwell Amendment to the Budget Resolution) Vote on a Cantwell (D-WA) amendment to the FY 2006 Senate budget resolution that would have deleted legislative language permitting environmentally sound oil/gas exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Amendment was rejected 51-49 on March 16, 2005 (Roll Number 52). The NAM opposed the amendment and strongly supports ANWR exploration, which provides the best opportunity to increase domestic production, decrease dependence on foreign oil and buy sufficient time for scientists, engineers and manufacturers to develop alternative energy sources. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Highway Bill (Senate Passage of H.R. 3) Vote on H.R. 3, a six-year bill to authorize funds for federal-aid highways, highway safety programs, and transit programs. Approved 89-11 on May 17, 2005 (Roll No. 125). The NAM supported H.R. 3, as the highway bill will provide a significant boost in GDP over the next five years. American manufacturers need an affordable, reliable, safe and efficient transportation infrastructure to move goods quickly to market. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Backdoor Implementation of Higher Fuel Efficiency Standards (Cantwell Amendment to Energy Bill H.R. 6) Vote on a Cantwell (D-WA) amendment to energy bill that would have required the U.S. to reduce dependence on foreign oil imports by 40 percent by 2025. Rejected 53-47 on June 16, 2004 (Roll No. 140). The NAM opposed the amendment, considering it to be a backdoor attempt at raising mandatory corporate average fuel economy standards. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Renewable Portfolio Standards (Bingaman Amendment to Energy Bill H.R. 6) Vote on a Bingaman (D-NM) amendment to energy bill H.R. 6 that would have required utilities to generate 10 percent of all electricity from renewable sources by 2025 or pay fees to the Energy Dept. Approved 52-48 on June 16 (Roll No. 141). The NAM opposed the renewable portfolio standard amendment, noting that its aggressive timetables were unrealistic for most regions of the country and would ultimately act as a tax on electricity for both consumers and industry. Provision was removed from the final energy bill by a House-Senate conference committee. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Banning an Offshore Oil/Gas Resources Assessment (Nelson Amendment to Energy Bill H.R. 6) Vote on a Nelson (D-FL)/Martinez (R-FL) amendment to energy bill H.R. 6 that would have deleted bill language requiring the Interior Dept. to conduct a scientific inventory and analysis of oil and gas resources beneath the waters of the Outer Continental Shelf. Rejected 52-44 on June 21, 2005 (Roll. No. 143). The NAM opposed the amendment, which would have denied policymakers the scientific data needed to assess the nation’s oil and gas supply. NAM Position: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Mandatory Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions (McCain/Lieberman amendment to energy bill H.R. 6) Vote on a McCain (R-AZ)/Lieberman (D-CT) amendment to energy bill H.R. 6 that would have imposed draconian limits on emissions of carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions, raising U.S. energy costs and increasing fuel switching from coal to natural gas. Rejected 60-38 on June 22, 2005 (Roll No. 148). NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Energy Policy Act (H.R. 6) Vote on final passage of energy bill H.R. 6. Approved 85-12 on June 28, 2005 (Roll No. 158). The NAM supported the legislation, which represents a major step toward achieving a long-term national energy policy that encourages voluntary energy efficiency initiatives, voluntary conservation, improvements to the energy infrastructure and increases in the supply of all sources of cost-effective renewable, alternative and conventional energy sources. Signed into law (P.L. 109-58) on Aug. 8, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Central America-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) Vote on legislation that would implement S. 1307, the Central American-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) into U.S. law. Approved 54-45 on June 30, 2005 (Roll No. 170). The NAM supported the legislation and the FTA, which is expected to result in $1 billion per year in increased U.S. manufactured exports and more U.S. jobs. Signed into law (P.L. 109-53) on Aug. 2, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Preventing Regulation Through Litigation (S. 397) Vote on S. 397, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Approved 65-31 on July 29, 2005 (Roll No. 219). The NAM supported the bill, which would forestall lawsuits brought with the intent of shutting down a legitimate and legal industry, while allowing those with merit to proceed. Signed into law (P.L. 109-92) on Oct. 26, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Rescinding EPA’s Clean Air Mercury Rule Vote on S.J. Res. 20, a resolution of disapproval to rescind EPA’s Clean Air Mercury Rule. Rejected 51-47 on September 13, 2005 (Roll 225). The NAM opposed S.J. Res. 20 and urged senators to preserve the rule, which uses a market-oriented cap-and-trade program that allows industry the necessary flexibility to develop and implement appropriate pollution reduction technology while significantly reducing mercury emissions. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Selecting Qualified, Pro-Business Judges (Judge John Roberts). Vote on the nomination of John Roberts, Jr., to be Chief Justice of the United States. Approved 78-22 on Sept. 29, 2005. The NAM formed the Judicial Review Committee (JRC) in early 2005 to actively review nominations to the federal courts. The overwhelming majority of federal cases involve issues that impact manufacturing, including contract law, employment law, regulatory policy, property rights and others. It is imperative that we have judges who understand these issues and their importance to the U.S. economy. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Selecting Qualified, Pro-Business Judges (Judge Samuel Alito). Vote on the nomination of Judge Samuel Alito to the U.S. Supreme Court. Approved 58-42 on Jan. 31, 2006 (Roll No. 2). The NAM’s Judicial Review Committee recommended supporting the Alito nomination. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Asbestos Litigation Reform (Motion to Waive the Budget Point of Order to S. 852). Vote on a procedural motion requiring 60 affirmative votes that would waive a point of order against S. 852, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution (FAIR) Act. Vote was 58-41, 2 shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on Feb. 14, 2006 (Roll No. 21). The NAM supported the procedural motion and opposed the point of order, which was based on faulty assumptions that the government would bail out the proposed privately-funded asbestos trust fund should it be exhausted. The NAM notified senators that voting “no” on this motion was tantamount to voting against asbestos litigation reform. Note: As a procedural move, Sen. Frist changed his vote to “no” to preserve the option of bringing the bill up again. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Tax Relief (Conference Report to H.R. 4297). Vote on tax reconciliation legislation that would extend the lower rates on capital gains and dividends through 2010. Approved 54-44 on May 11, 2006 (Roll No. 118). The NAM supported the legislation, noting that lower tax rates on investment income have played a major role in our economic recovery. NAM POSITION: Yes Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Small Business Health Plans (Cloture Vote on S. 1955). Vote on a procedural motion to limit debate and move to final passage of S. 1955, legislation allowing well-established trade associations to offer affordable health insurance coverage to their members through Small Business Health Plans. Vote was 55-43, 5 shy of the 60 required under Senate rules to limit debate, on May 11, 2006 (Roll 119). The NAM supported the cloture motion and S. 1955, which would give small companies the flexibility they need to provide a broad range of insurance products to their employees. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Permanently Repealing the Death Tax (Motion to Proceed to H.R. 8). Vote on a procedural motion to debate H.R. 8, legislation that would permanently repeal the estate or “death tax.” Vote was 57-41, 3 votes shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on June 8, 2006 (Roll No. 164). The NAM supported the motion to proceed and H.R. 8. Large estate tax bills and related attorneys’ fees force the sale of many small manufacturing companies upon the owner’s death. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Domestic Energy Development in the Outer Continental Shelf (S. 3711). Vote on final passage of S. 3711, legislation that would permit environmentally sound oil/gas development in key areas of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Approved 71-25 on August 1, 2006 (Roll No. 219). NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Rejecting Counterproductive Security Mandates. Vote on motion to table, or defeat, a Schumer (D-NY) amendment to port security bill H.R. 4954 that would have required 100 percent scanning of all inbound sea containers. Tabling motion was approved, and the amendment rejected, by a vote of 61-37 on Sept. 14, 2006 (Roll No. 248). The NAM supported the tabling motion and opposed the amendment, which was not feasible, given the current technology, and would have levied counterproductive federal mandates on industry, caused massive delays and disruptions in the global supply chain, and ultimately cost American jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 11%
NAM’s Official 108th Congress Voting Record (Senate)
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
1) Blocking Clean Air Act’s New Source Review Reforms. Vote on an Edwards (D-NC) amendment to the FY 2003 omnibus spending bill that would have delayed EPA’s proposed reforms to the New Source Review program until a study had been completed by the National Academy of Sciences. Rejected 50-46 on January 22, 2003 (Roll No. 12). NAM members opposed the amendment, noting that the NSR program has been under review for more than a decade. The reforms will alleviate confusion surrounding NSR compliance requirements and help promote safer, cleaner and more efficient factories, refineries and power plants. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
2) Prohibiting Environmentally Sound Oil/Gas Exploration in ANWR. Vote on a Boxer (D-CA) amendment to the FY 2004 Senate budget resolution that deleted bill language permitting environmentally-sound oil/gas exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Amendment was approved 52-48 on March 19, 2003 (Roll No. 59). The NAM strongly supports ANWR development, which provides the best opportunity to increase domestic production, decrease dependence on foreign oil and buy sufficient time for scientists, engineers and manufacturers to develop alternative energy sources. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
3) FY2004 Senate Budget Resolution. Vote on S.Con. Res. 23, the Senate FY 2004 budget resolution. Approved 56-44 on March 26, 2003 (Roll No. 108). Despite opposing provisions in the resolution curbing the President’s tax relief efforts, the NAM supported passage as a means of moving the legislation to conference. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
4) Jobs, Growth and Tax Relief. Vote on the conference report to jobs, growth and tax relief bill H.R. 2. Approved 51-50 on May 23, 2003 (Roll No. 196). NAM members supported the pro-growth package, which reduced taxes on dividends and capital gains, expanded expensing and increased bonus depreciation for businesses and reduced taxes for individuals and many small businesses. Signed into law (P.L. 108-27) on May 28, 2003. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
5) Banning an Offshore Oil/Gas Resources Assessment. Vote on a Graham (D-FL) amendment to energy bill S. 14 that would have deleted bill language requiring the Interior Dept. to conduct a scientific inventory and analysis of oil and natural gas resources beneath the waters of the Outer Continental Shelf. Rejected 54-44 on June 12, 2003 (Roll No. 221). The NAM opposed the amendment, which would have denied policy-makers the scientific data needed to assess the nation’s oil and gas supply. NAM POSITION: No N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
6) Medical Liability Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to debate S. 11, legislation that would help make health coverage more affordable for millions of Americans by addressing all forms of medical liability (malpractice, plan coverage decisions, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, etc.). Vote was 49-48, 11 shy of the 60 votes needed to overcome opponents’ filibuster and begin debate on the bill, on July 9, 2003 (Roll No. 264). The NAM has long championed medical liability reform because of the downstream consequences for higher health care costs from unlimited damage awards, liability insurance, and defensive medicine. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
7) Reasonable Fuel Efficiency Standards. Vote on a Bond (R-MO)/Levin (D-MI) amendment to energy bill S. 14 that would direct the Transportation Department to conduct an extensive analysis of the effects of higher corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards on the U.S. economy, environment and domestic manufacturing industry by April 2006. Approved 66-30 on July 29, 2003 (Roll No. 310). NAM members supported the amendment, which would prevent lawmakers from arbitrarily mandating higher CAFE levels and would allow adequate time for a scientific analysis of CAFE standards. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
8) U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreement. Vote on H.R. 2739, legislation implementing the U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreement. Approved 66-32 on July 31, 2003 (Roll No. 318). NAM members supported the accord, which sets a valuable precedent for future FTAs with the developing countries of Southeast Asia, where U.S. manufactured exports face average bound tariff rates of 30 percent. Signed into law (P.L. 108-78) on Sept. 3, 2003. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
9) U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement. Vote on H.R. 2738, legislation implementing the U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement. Approved 66-31 on July 31, 2003 (Roll No. 319). The NAM supported the accord, which eliminates nearly all tariffs on U.S. manufactured exports upon implementation and provides the framework for a successful FTAA accord. Signed into law (P.L. 108-77) on Sept. 3, 2003. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
10) Blocking Increases To Individual Tax Rates. Vote on a motion to table, or defeat, a Biden (D-DE) amendment that would have given the Secretary of Treasury authority to raise the top marginal income tax rates for individuals from 2005 through 2010. Tabling motion was approved, and the amendment rejected, by a vote of 57-42 on Oct. 2, 2003 (Roll No. 373). The NAM supported the tabling motion and opposed the amendment, noting that more than 50 percent of the NAM’s small and medium-sized manufacturers pay taxes at the individual rates. A rate increase would limit funds available for companies to expand and create new jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
11) Class Action Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to proceed to debate S. 1751, legislation aimed at curbing the explosion of frivolous class-action lawsuits. Motion failed 59-39, 1 shy of the 60 required under Senate procedural rules on Oct. 22, 2003 (Roll No. 403). The NAM supported the motion to proceed and the underlying bill, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
12) Implementing the Kyoto Climate Change Accord. Vote on a substitute amendment to S. 139, the McCain (R-AZ)/Lieberman (D-CT) climate change bill. Rejected 55-43 on October 30, 2003 (Roll No. 420). The NAM opposed the amendment and the underlying bill, which would have begun implementing the greenhouse gas limits embodied in the flawed Kyoto Protocol treaty, raising U.S. energy costs and increasing fuel-switching from coal to natural gas. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
13) Ending the Filibuster on Energy Legislation. Vote on a cloture motion to limit debate and proceed to a final vote on the conference report to energy bill H.R. 6. Vote was 57-40, 3 shy of the 60 required under procedural rules, on Nov. 21, 2003 (Roll No. 456). The NAM supported the cloture motion and the underlying bill, which would encourage research and development, energy efficiency and improvements to the energy infrastructure. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
14) Medicare Reform. Vote on the conference report to Medicare reform bill H.R. 1. Approved 54-44 on Nov. 25, 2003 (Roll No. 459). The NAM supported the conference agreement, which provides affordable prescription drug coverage, immediate cost savings and greater choice to Medicare beneficiaries and flexible assistance to employers who currently provide retiree health coverage. Signed into law (P.L. 108-173) on Dec. 8, 2003. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
15) Sinking Liability Reform. Vote on a Feinstein (D-CA) “poison pill” amendment to S. 1805, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Adopted 52-47 on March 2, 2004 (Roll No. 24). The amendment, which would have reauthorized the ban on certain assault weapons for 10 years, was widely viewed as an effort to defeat S. 1805. The NAM would not have had a position on this amendment as a stand-alone bill, but opposed it because it served as a “killer” amendment for S. 1805, which was designed to forestall lawsuits brought with the intent of shutting down a legitimate and legal industry. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
16) Reinstating Superfund Taxes. Vote on a Lautenberg (D-NJ) amendment to the Senate FY 2005 budget resolution that would reinstate expired Superfund taxes. Rejected 52-44 on March 11, 2004 (Roll No. 45). The NAM strongly opposes reinstatement of all Superfund taxes as an unnecessary burden on industry ($15 billion over 10 years), as there is no connection between the taxes and funding for Superfund cleanups. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
17) Pension Funding – 30-Year Treasury Fix. Vote on the conference report to H.R. 3108, legislation replacing the defunct 30-year Treasury interest rate used for pension calculations with a composite rate of high-quality, long-term corporate bond indices for two years. Approved 78-19 on April 8, 2004 (Roll No. 68). The NAM supported the bill, noting that failure to rectify the problem could impede our nation’s emerging economic recovery and threaten the retirement security of millions of American workers. Signed into law (P.L. 108-218) on April 10, 2004. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
18) Asbestos Litigation Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to proceed to debate S. 2290, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution (FAIR) Act. Motion failed 50-47, 10 votes shy of the 60 needed to debate the bill, on April 22, 2004 (Roll No. 69). The NAM supported the procedural motion and a full debate regarding asbestos, noting that failure to enact legislation could reduce economic growth by $2.4 billion per year and cost more than 30,000 jobs annually. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
19) Undermining Improvements To Overtime Pay Regulations. Vote on a Harkin (D-IA) amendment to JOBS bill S. 1637. The amendment would prohibit the Labor Dept. from implementing its final rule updating the definition of “white collar” employees, which are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime requirements. Approved 52-47 on May 4, 2004 (Roll No. 79). The NAM opposed the amendment, believing the final rule will reduce uncertainty and help companies draw the line between exempt and non-exempt employees correctly. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
20) FSC/ETI: The JOBS Act (Cloture Motion). Vote on a procedural (cloture) motion to debate S. 1637, the Jumpstart Our Business Strength (JOBS) Act. Approved 90-8, exceeding by 30 the number of affirmative votes required under Senate rules (Roll No. 87) on May 11, 2004. The NAM supported the cloture motion and the underlying bill, which would address the FSC/ETI dispute and allow the U.S. to comply with our international obligations without sacrificing competitiveness and jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
21) FSC/ETI: The JOBS Act (Final Passage). Vote on S. 1637, the Jumpstart Our Business Strength (JOBS) Act. Approved 92-5 on May 11, 2004 (Roll No. 91). The NAM supported the bill, which would address the FSC/ETI dispute and allow the U.S. to comply with our international obligations without sacrificing competitiveness and jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes Y Voted WITH the preferred position
22) Class Action Reform. Vote on a cloture motion to limit debate and proceed to final action on S. 2062, the Class Action Fairness Act. Motion failed 44-43, 16 shy of the 60 required under Senate procedural rules on July 8, 2004 (Roll No. 154). The NAM supported the motion to invoke cloture and the underlying bill, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y -
23) United States-Australia Free Trade Agreement. Vote on legislation that would implement the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement into U.S. law. Approved 80-16 on July 15, 2004 (Roll No. 156). The NAM supported the legislation and the FTA, which is likely to result in $1.8 billion per year in increased U.S. manufactured exports and more U.S. jobs. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 18%
NAM’s Official 107th Congress Voting Record (Senate)
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Vote on S.J. Res. 6, a joint resolution disapporving OSHA’s final rule on ergonomics. Approved 56-44 (Roll No. 15) on March 6, 2001. The NAM supported the bill and opposed the $18 billion over-reaching regulation, which was scientifically and legally flawed. Signed into law (P.L. 107-5) on March 27, 2002. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the McCain (R-ZA)/Feingold (D-WI) campaign finance bill, which would ban “soft-money” contributions to political parties, significantly restrict the free-speech rights of Americans, etc. Approved 59-41 (Roll No. 64) on April 2, 2001. Similar version signed into law (P.L. 107-155) on March 27, 2002. NAM Position: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on teh conference report to H. Con. Res. 83, the non-binding FY 2002 budget resolution, which included $1.35 trillion in tax cuts through FY 2011 and discretionary spending limits of $661.3 billion. Approved 53-47 on May 10, 2001 (Roll No. 98). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Final vote on the President’s tax-cut proposal, H.R. 1836, which implements the following over an 11-year period: across-the-board reductions in individual tax rates at all levels, an immediate economic stimulus plan and a phase-out of the death tax. Approved 58-33 on May 26, 2001 (Roll No. 170) Signed into law (P.L. 107-16) on June 7, 2001. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a Gramm (R-TX) amendment to the Kennedy (D-MA)/McCain (R-AZ) patients’ rights bill. Amendment would have excluded employers and other plan sponsors from liability without exceptions. Rejected 57-43 on June 26, 2001 (Roll No. 197). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a motion to table or defeat a Nelson (D-FL) amendment to H.R. 2217, the FY 2002 Interior appropriations bill. Amendment would have placed a six-month moratorium on any new oil/gas leases in teh Gulf of Mexico, including the very promisinig Lease Sale 181 in the Eastern Gulf. Tabling motion was approved (and the amendment rejected) 67-33 on July 12, 2001 (Roll No. 231). The NAM supported the tabling motion, considering this vote a key first test of the resolve of Congress to develop a long-term energy strategy. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the nomination of John Graham, director of Harvard’s Center for Risk Analysis, to be administrator of OMB’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Nomination approved 61-37 on July 19, 2001 (Roll No. 242). Calling the vote the “most important regulatory decision” of the year, the NAM supported the nomination of Graham, who advocates a rational approach to federal rulemaking that focuses on sound scientific analysis and cost-effective solutions. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a Levin (D-MI)/Bond (R-MO) amendment to replace energy bill S. 517′s mandated increatse in corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards to 35 mpg, with language giving federal experts at NHTSA two years to study and set appropriate CAFE standards after reviewing relevant technological, safety, economic and environmental issues. Approved 62-38 on March 13, 2002 (Roll No. 47). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a Kyl (R-AZ) amendment to energy bill S. 517. AMendment would have replaced the bill’s renewable portfolio standard mandate-which would raise electricity prices and reduce reliability by essentially requiring one-third of all new electric-generating capacities between now and 2019 to consist of wind or solar power or biomass-with a consumer choice, state-based approach. Rejected 58-40 on March 21, 2002 (Roll No. 55). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a cloture motion (requiring 60 votes) to limit debate and move to final consideration of a Murkowski (R-AK)/Breaux (D-LA) amendment to energy bill S. 517. AMendment sought to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil by permitting limited, environmentally sound oil/gas exploration in teh Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge. Rejected 54-46 (14 votes shy of the required 60) on April 18, 2002 (Roll No. 71). The NAM supported both the cloture peition and the amendment. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Motion to table or reject a Kerry (D-MA) amendment that would have watered down investor protections against governmental expropriation via regulatory actions. Amendment was tabled 55-41 (Roll No. 121) on May 21, 2002. The NAM supported the tabling motion and opposed teh amendment. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a procedural motion requiring 60 votes to allow consideration and passage of a Gramm (R-TX)/Kyl (R-AZ) amendment permanently repealing the death tax. Vote was 54-44, 6 shy of the 60 needed on June 12, 2002 (Roll No. 151). The NAM supported the amendment and the procedural motion, as estate tax rates as high as 55 percent force the sale of many small manufacturing companies upon the owner’s death. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a motion to table or defeat a McConnell (R-KY) amendment to terrorism insurance bill S. 2600. Amendment woudl have ensured that private parties are not unfairly penalized by punitive damages should they fall victim to terrorist activities. Motion to table was approved, and the amendment rejected, 50-46 on June 13, 2002 (Roll No. 152). The NAM supported the amendment and opposed the tabling motion. NAM Position: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a motion to proceed with legislation allowing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to become the nation’s permanent repository for spent nuclear fuel. Approved 60-39 on July 9, 2002 (Roll No. 167). The NAM supported the motion and the underlying bill, noting that after 20 years of scientific study, Yucca Mountain is a proven safe, secure and suitable repository. Signed into law (P.L. 107-200) on July 23, 2002. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Motion to waive a point of order (requiring 60 votes) and clear the path for passage of S. 2, the Grassley (R-IA)/Breaux (D-LA)/Jeffords (I-VT) “tripartisan” bill that would add a Part D drug benefit for beneficiaries; take steps toward comprehensive Medicare reform by providing for an enhanced and unified Medicare fee-for-service benefit (Medicare Part E); and strengthen the Medicare and Medicare +Choice programs. Motion failed 51-48, 12 shy of the 60 required for passage on July 23, 2002 (Roll No. 187). The NAM supported the procedural motion and the underlying bill, which would assist employers with unduly high retiree drug costs and costs that exceed the out-of-pocket cap. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the conference report to H.R. 3009, which renews Trade Promotion Authority for five years, extends the Andean Trade Preference Act, expands the Trade Adjustment Assistance program, renews Generalized System of Preferences and more. Approved 64-34 on August 1, 2002 (Roll No. 207). Signed into law (P.L. 107-210) on August 6, 2002. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 0%
NAM’s Official 106th Congress Voting Record (Senate)
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Vote on the conference report to H. Con. Res. 68, the non-binding FY 2000 budget resolution, setting budgetary levels through FY 2009. Included provisions to cut taxes and the national debt while preserving 100 percent of the Social Security trust fund. Approved 54-44 on April 15, 1999 (Roll No. 86). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Motion to table, or defeat, a Kerry (D-MA) substitute to Y2K liability bill S. 96. The substitute, backed by the White House, would have scaled back S. 96 by removing caps on punitive damages and substituting judicial discretion for clear rules on proportionate liability. Substitute tabled 57-41 on June 9, 1999 (Roll No. 159). The NAM opposed the substitute and supported the tabling motion. NAM-backed Y2K legislation was signed into law (P.L. 106-37) on July 20, 1999. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a Gregg (R-NH) amendment to the Democratic Patients’ Bill of Rights proposal. Amendment sough to delete language in the underlying bill that allowed patients to sue their employers in state courts if they were harmed by a plan’s denial of treatment. Adopted 53-47 on July 15, 1999 (Roll No. 206). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on S. 1429, Roth (R-DE) legislation calling for $792 billion in tax cuts over 10 years. Approved 57-43 on July 30, 1999 (Roll no. 247). Final version of bill vetoed on September 23, 1999. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a motion to invoke cloture on S. 1593, the McCain (R-AZ)/Feingold (D-WI) bill, which would have banned soft-money contributions to political parties and significantly infringed on the free speech rights of Americans. Motion fell seven votes short of the 60 needed for cloture, 53-47 on October 19, 1999 (Roll No. 331). The NAM opposed the cloture motion and the underlying bill. NAM Position: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Motion to table a Kennedy (D-MA) amendment to S. 625, increasing the minimum wage by $1 over two years and calling for tax increases without adequately providing significant tax relief to small businesses. The tabling motion was approved (and the amendment rejected) 50-48 on November 9, 1999 (Roll No. 356). The NAM opposed the amendment and supported the tabling motion. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a Wellstone (D-MN) amendment that would have imposed an 18-month moratorium on agribusiness mergers and acquisitions, prohibiting small firms on the verge of bankruptcy from taking actions to preserve employees’ jobs and salvage the firm’s assets. Rejected 71-27 on November 17, 1999 (Roll No. 366). NAM Position: No. N Voted WITH the preferred position
Vote on S. 1287, Murkowski (R-AK) legislation to provide for the storage of spent nuclear fuel, pending completion of the nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Approved 64-34 on February 10, 2000 (Roll No. 8). Vetoed April 25, 2000. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Motion to table/defeat a Daschle (D-SD) amendment to the FY 2001 defense authorization bill. Amendment would have left employers offering health benefits exposed to medical malpractice/personal injury lawsuits and increased the government’s role in the health care system. Tabling motion was approved and the amendment rejected, 51-48 on June 8, 2000 (Roll No. 121). The NAM opposed the amendment and supported the tabling motion. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on an Enzi (R-WY) amendment to the Labor-HHS spending bill that would prohibit OSHA funding in FY 2001 for advancing or finalizing an ergonomics regulation. Approved 57-41 on June 22, 2000 (Roll No. 143). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on H.R. 8, legislation to phase out the death tax. Estate tax rates as high as 55 percent force the sale of many family-owned small manufacturing companies upon the owner’s death. Approved 59-39 on July 14, 2000 (Roll No. 197). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on a cloture motion to proceed to H.R. 4444, legislation granting China permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status, significantly reducing tariffs on U.S. exports and opening new markets to U.S. companies. Approved 86-12 on July 27, 2000 (Roll No. 231). NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Motion to table, or defeat, a Thompson (R-TN)/Torricelli (D-NJ) amendment to H.R. 4444, legislation granting China permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status. Amendment would have imposed unilateral sanctions on U.S. business with China and negated many of the benefits of PNTR. Tabling motion was approved 65-32 on September 13, 2000 (Roll No. 242). The NAM opposed the amendment and supported the tabling motion. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Vote on S. 2045, a Hatch (R-UT) bill helping companies address the worker skills shortage by: raising the annual cap on H-1B high-skilled foreign workers through FY 2003; addressing inefficiencies in the green-card process; ensuring that fees paid by employers hiring H-1B workers are dedicated to education and training programs for U.S. workers; etc. Approved 96-1 on October 3, 2000 (Roll No. 262). Signed into law (P.L. 106-313) on October 17, 2000. NAM Position: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 29%
Key Legal Reform Votes 106th – 109th Congresses
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Support for Year 2000 Liability Reform (Motion To Table Kerry Substitute to S. 96). Motion to table, or defeat, a Kerry (D-MA) substitute to Y2K liability bill S. 96. The substitute, backed by the White House, would have scaled back S. 96 by removing caps on punitive damages and substituting judicial discretion for clear rules on proportionate liability. Substitute tabled 57–41 on June 9, 1999 (Roll No. 159). The NAM opposed the substitute and supported the tabling motion. NAM-backed Y2K legislation was signed into law (P.L. 106–37) on July 20, 1999. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Opposition to Health Care Liability Standards (Gregg Amendment to S. 1344). Vote on a Gregg (R-NH) amendment to the Democratic Patients’ Bill of Rights proposal. Amendment sought to delete language in the underlying bill that allowed patients to sue their employers in state courts if they were harmed by a plan’s denial of treatment. Adopted 53–47 on July 15, 1999 (Roll No. 206). NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Opposition to Patients’ Bill of Rights (Motion To Table Amendment to S. 2549). Motion to table/defeat a Daschle (D-SD) amendment to the FY 2001 defense authorization bill. Amendment would have left employers offering health benefits exposed to medical malpractice/personal injury lawsuits and increased the government’s role in the health care system. Tabling motion was approved and the amendment rejected, 51–48 on June 8, 2000 (Roll No. 121). The NAM opposed the amendment and supported the tabling motion. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Health Care Liability Exemption (Gramm Amendment to S. 1052). Vote on a Gramm (R-TX) amendment to the Kennedy (D-MA)/McCain (R-AZ) patients’ rights bill. Amendment would have excluded employers and other plan sponsors from liability without exceptions. Rejected 57–43 on June 26, 2001 (Roll No. 197). NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Terrorism Insurance (Motion to Table McConnell Amendment to S. 2600). Vote on a motion to table or defeat a McConnell (R-KY) amendment to terrorism insurance bill S. 2600. Amendment would have ensured that private parties are not unfairly penalized by punitive damages should they fall victim to terrorist activities. Motion to table was approved, and the amendment rejected, 50–46 on June 13, 2002 (Roll No. 152). The NAM supported the amendment and opposed the tabling motion. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Medical Liability Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to debate S. 11, legislation that would help make health coverage more affordable for millions of Americans by addressing all forms of medical liability (malpractice, plan coverage decisions, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, etc.). Vote was 49-48, 11 shy of the 60 votes needed to overcome opponents’ filibuster and begin debate on the bill, on July 9, 2003 (Roll No. 264). The NAM has long championed medical liability reform because of the downstream consequences for higher health care costs from unlimited damage awards, liability insurance and defensive medicine. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Class Action Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to proceed to debate S. 1751, legislation aimed at curbing the explosion of frivolous class-action lawsuits. Motion failed 59-39, 1 shy of the 60 required under Senate procedural rules, on Oct. 22, 2003 (Roll No. 403). The NAM supported the motion to proceed and the underlying bill, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Sinking Liability Reform. Vote on a Feinstein (D-CA) “poison pill” amendment to S. 1805, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Adopted 52-47 on March 2, 2004 (Roll No. 24). The amendment, which would have reauthorized the ban on certain assault weapons for 10 years, was widely viewed as an effort to defeat S. 1805. The NAM would not have had a position on this amendment as a stand-alone bill, but opposed it because it served as a “killer” amendment for S. 1805, which was designed to forestall lawsuits brought with the intent of shutting down a legitimate and legal industry. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Asbestos Litigation Reform. Vote on a procedural motion to proceed to debate S. 2290, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution (FAIR) Act. Motion failed 50-47, 10 votes shy of the 60 needed to debate the bill, on April 22, 2004 (Roll No. 69). The NAM supported the procedural motion and a full debate regarding asbestos, noting that failure to enact legislation could reduce economic growth by $2.4 billion per year and cost more than 30,000 jobs annually. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Class Action Reform. Vote on a cloture motion to limit debate and proceed to final action on S. 2062, the Class Action Fairness Act. Motion failed 44-43, 16 shy of the 60 required under Senate procedural rules, on July 8, 2004 (Roll No. 154). The NAM supported the motion to invoke cloture and the underlying bill, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y -
Class Action Reform. Vote on S. 5, the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005. Approved 72-26 on Feb. 10, 2005 (Roll No. 9). The NAM supported the bill, which would curb trial lawyer “forum shopping” by shifting most major class actions to federal courts, without altering plaintiffs’ right to sue. Signed into law (P.L. 109-2) on Feb. 18, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Preventing Regulation Through Litigation. Vote on S. 397, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Approved 65-31 on July 29, 2005 (Roll No. 219). The NAM supported the bill, which would forestall lawsuits brought with the intent of shutting down a legitimate and legal industry, while allowing those with merit to proceed. Signed into law (P.L. 109-92) on Oct. 26, 2005. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Asbestos Litigation Reform. Vote on a procedural motion that would waive a point of order against S. 852, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution (FAIR) Act. Vote was 58-41, 2 shy of the 60 required under Senate rules, on Feb. 14, 2006 (Roll No. 21). The NAM supported the procedural motion and opposed the point of order, which was based on faulty assumptions. The NAM notified senators that voting “no” on this motion was tantamount to voting against asbestos litigation reform. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 0%
Key Senate Energy Votes 109th and 110th Congresses
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Cantwell Amendment to Budget Resolution. Rejected 51-49 N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the Bingaman Amendment. Approved 52-48. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the Nelson (D-FL) amendment to H.R. 6. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the McCain/Lieberman climate change amendment. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on final passage Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Vote on S. 3711, the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Cloture vote on the Baucus energy tax provision to energy bill HR 6. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the cloture motion to the House version of energy bill H.R. 6, which included energy taxes, renewable tax credits and federal portfolio mandates. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the Ensign/Cantwell renewable energy amendment. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Vote on the McConnell energy supply amendment to S 2284 Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Vote on the Motion to Proceed to Warner Lieberman Climate Security Act. N -
Motion to Proceed to NAM-opposed S. 3044, which included high energy taxes, price gouging/price controls language and ill-advised changes to U.S. antitrust law. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 18%
NAM’s Official 105th Congress Voting Record
Description Preferred Position This official’s vote compared with the preferred position
Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution (S.J. Res. 1). Vote on a joint resolution proposing a constitutional amendment to require a balanced budget by the year 2002, or two years after ratification by three-fourths (38) of the states, whichever is later. Would require three-fifths vote of both chambers to approve deficit spending or to increase the public debt limit. Requiring two-thirds approval, or 67 votes, the proposal failed by one vote, 66–34, on March 4,1997. The NAM supported the amendment as a needed reform to compel fiscal responsibility. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Interim Nuclear Waste Storage (S. 104). Passage of bill to authorize construction of a temporary storage site for spent nuclear fuel in the Nevada desert. Would alleviate the problem of dwindling storage space at nuclear utilities and preclude the need to build additional on-site storage at an estimated cost to consumers of $7 billion. Approved 65–34 on April 15, 1997. The NAM supported the measure, arguing that manufacturers and other nuclear ratepayers have already paid $10 billion to finance permanent federal storage, which is years behind schedule. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Budget Resolution (Conference Report to H.Con. Res. 84). Final passage of a five-year budget blueprint that set the path for elimination of the budget deficit, without net tax increases. Resolution called for reductions in spending growth by $322 billion, including $128.6 billion in Medicare and Medicaid reforms. Also included tax cuts totaling $85 billion. Approved 76–22 on June 5, 1997. The NAM supported the resolution as a well-balanced plan that would deliver muchneeded tax relief for American families and businesses, while reducing the size and scope of the federal government to 18.9 percent of GDP in 2005 — the lowest in more than 20 years. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Fast Track Trade Negotiating Authority (Motion To Proceed to S. 1269). Vote on a procedural motion, requiring 60 votes, to limit debate and proceed to consideration of S. 1269, legislation renewing U.S. trade negotiating authority. Passed 68–31 on Nov. 5, 1997. The NAM supported the cloture motion and the legislation, which would permit administrations to negotiate market-opening trade agreements and preserve Congress’ right to reject or approve the trade pacts without amendments. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Campaign Finance (Motion To Table McCain/Feingold Substitute to S. 1663). Vote on a McConnell (R-KY) motion to table a revised version of the McCain (R-AZ)/Feingold (D-WI) bill, S. 1663. Substitute would have made major changes in campaign finance law, including restricting the ability of non-profit groups to exercise their right to free speech. McConnell motion was rejected 50–48 on Feb. 26, 1998, allowing further debate on the bill. The NAM supported the McConnell motion and opposed the McCain/Feingold substitute. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Education Savings Accounts (Senate Version of H.R. 2646). Final passage of the Coverdell (R-GA)/Torricelli (D-NJ) proposal that would have: allowed increased contributions to education savings accounts; expanded the Section 127 exclusion for employer-provided tuition assistance to include graduate-level studies; allowed corporations to establish scholarship funds for low income children; and more. Passed 56–43 on April 23, 1998. The NAM supported the legislation, which would have broadened the availability of tax and savings incentives to employers that wish to improve the educational opportunities of both current and prospective employees. Conference report vetoed July 21, 1998. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Job Training Program Consolidation (Senate Version of H.R. 1385). Final passage of a DeWine (R-OH) bill to consolidate and improve nearly 70 existing federal training programs via flexible state programs, better accountability of programs and business leadership of key partnerships at the local level. Approved 91–7 on May 5, 1998. The NAM supported the legislation, which aims to help address the critical skills shortage. H.R. 1385 was signed into law on Aug. 7, 1998. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted WITH the preferred position
Uniform Securities Litigation Standard (S. 1260). Vote on legislation creating a uniform national standard for securities class action suits. Aims to close a loophole in a 1995 federal law that allows trial lawyers to file frivolous securities suits against public companies in state courts. Approved 79–21 on May 13, 1998. The NAM supported the bill, which allows company resources to flow to growth-oriented endeavors (research, job creation, higher wages and shareholder returns), rather than litigation. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Temporary Visas for High-Skilled Workers (S. 1723). Passage of an Abraham (R-MI)bill to raise the cap on H-1B temporary work visas. (FY 1998 cap on H-1B visas was reached in May 1998.) Approved 78–20 on May 18, 1998. The NAM supported the bill, since not enough American-born workers are available to fill the demand for engineers, computer technicians and others, who are critical for U.S. competitiveness and growth. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Tobacco Industry Restrictions (First Cloture Vote on S. 1415). Motion to invoke cloture (and end debate) on tobacco bill S. 1415. Bill included: ill-advised taxes on U.S. exports and on tobacco products manufactured and sold overseas; advertising restrictions that could have violated manufacturers’ First Amendment rights; the creation of new, unnecessary federal bureaucracies; and inadequate limits on runaway civil damage awards. Motion fell 18 votes shy of 60 needed for cloture, 42–56, on June 9, 1998. The NAM opposed the bill and opposed cloture. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Unilateral Sanctions Reform (Motion To Table Lugar Amendment to S. 2159). Vote on a motion to table the Lugar (R-IN) amendment to agriculture appropriations bill S. 2159. The Lugar amendment would have created a more disciplined, deliberative policy process for considering and implementing new unilateral economic sanctions. Tabling motion passed 53–46 on July 15, 1998, ending debate on the Lugar amendment. As a leader in the fight to reform the nation’s haphazard unilateral sanctions policy, the NAM supported the amendment and opposed the tabling motion. NAM POSITION: No. N Voted WITH the preferred position
Restrictions on Union “Salting” Practices (Motion To Proceed to S. 1981). Vote on a procedural motion to limit debate and proceed to consideration of “anti-salting” bill S. 1981. The legislation would have curbed the practice of salting, when union organizers seek employment with the primary purpose of disrupting or unionizing the workplace. Motion fell 8 votes shy of 60 needed for cloture, 52–42, on Sept. 14, 1998. The NAM supported the cloture motion and S. 1981. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
Employer Health Liability (Motion To Table the Motion To Proceed to S. 1890). Vote on a procedural motion to block floor action on S. 1890, dubiously named the “patients’ bill of rights.” Motion approved 50–47 on Oct. 9, 1998, ending debate on the bill. The NAM supported the tabling motion and opposed S. 1890, which would have exposed employer health plans — and employers — to medical malpractice liability, thereby increasing health care costs, decreasing insurance coverage and shifting much-needed resources from health care to the trial bar. NAM POSITION: Yes. Y Voted AGAINST the preferred position
This official’s percentage on this voting record: 38%
Symbol Key:
Voted with the preferred position Voted against the preferred position
Y Voted YES N Voted NO
- Did Not Vote A Absent
T Paired Vote Z Presiding
P Voted PRESENT
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