Václav Klaus: Global Warming is the New Socialism

By November 28, 2007Global Warming

UPDATE (12:20 p.m.) Should have seen this earlier: “Prague- Incumbent Czech President Vaclav Klaus has become the first and so far the only official candidate for next February’s presidential elections, representatives of the senior governing Civic Democrats (ODS) told journalists today.” Apparently they’re not scared off by a politician who speaks his mind and calls global warming bunk.

Original post below:

President Václav Klaus of the Czech Republic is a brave politician, an economist whose free-market views were shaped by decades of living under Communist tyranny. He’s also a fierce critic of climate extremism, offering withering critiques of the conventional wisdom being forced down the public’s throats.

In a November 23rd interview with the German newspaper, Die Welt, entitled, “Climate Protection is the New Socialism,” Klaus pulled no punches. So interesting and edifying to see an elected official challenge the machine in such a direct manner.

Interview Ulli Kulke notes that in his recent book, Klaus compared two ideologies hostile to the free-market, socialism and environmentalism. In 1968, Prague produced a powerful impulse against socialism, the Prague Spring. Are we seeing something similar today, a Prague Spring of the environment? Klaus:

I don’t want to be that optimistic. But it does seem like there are a few things coming into motion. People are becoming more thoughtful. A small turning point might well have been the Nobel Prize for the ideologue and propagandist Al Gore. If the Nobel Committee really wanted to help the climate alarmists, they didn’t do them a favor. As an economist, I recognize the law of diminishing returns. If you continue to invest in the one and same project, it begins to produce smaller returns. That’s what happening now with the same warnings against climate change, on and on and on.

And what of President Bush, who accepts climate change and now follows the lead of German chancellor Angela Merkel? Klaus:

It is not my job to analyze the debate between these two politicians. But this year I’ve spoken with Bush a number of time and I have my doubts that he’s changed his mind. He’s a politician, and he, too, must play to the public, react to them.

The topic of religion also surfaces several times. Indeed, the first exchange:

Q: Germany’s environmentalists love this dictum: “We have only borrowed the world from our children.” What’s meant by that is this: We must leave to the coming generations the world as we had it left to us.

A: I simply cannot accept that. Naturally we must treat the world as carefully as possible. But the conceit that the only the world is important and mankind is not, that’s unbearable. On the contrary, we must live on and with the world. And: Without people the world has no sense and worth, although there we’re almost to the point of religious matters.

We’ve put the entire interview in the extended entry below. It’s our quick-and-dirty translation, so may be off on a point or two, but the thrust is clear.


Climate protection is the new socialism
Vaclav Klaus on the consequences of a fundamentalist environmentalism

DIE WELT:

Q: Germany’s environmentalists love this dictum: “We have only borrowed the world from our children.” What’s meant by that is this: We must leave to the coming generations the world as we had it left to us.

A: I simply cannot accept that. Naturally we must treat the world as carefully as possible. But the conceit that the only the world is important and mankind is not, that’s unbearable. On the contrary, we must live on and with the world. And: Without people the world has no sense and worth, although there we’re almost to the point of religious matters.

Q: Do you have children to whom you would return a world that’s in doubt?

A: I have children and grandchildren.

Q: How do you think the current debate over global warming will be discussed in the future, perhaps in 20 or 30 years?

A: I’m assuming that in 30 years the next generation will know nothing about this debate. But if they do, they may very well laugh about today’s “end of the world” mood and ask themselves: How was it even possible that people in 2007 thought such curious things and reacted so strangely?

Q: We ask the same today: How is it possible?

A: Perhaps sociologists and other social scientists can provide us some insight. These phenomena and mechanisms are, admittedly, also not new. The environmental debate and the preaching of self-denial and of another lifestyle – we’ve been talking about that since the 60s and 70s. The Club of Rome was already scaring us back then with graphs and charts.

Q: The debate is not new, but the fronts have shifted. Even President George Bush says he’s now convinced of global climate change and takes the path of Angel Merkel on protecting the climate.

A: It is not my job to analyze the debate between these two politicians. But this year I’ve spoken with Bush a number of time and I have my doubts that he’s changed his mind. He’s a politician, and he, too, must play to the public, react to them.

Q: In September you gave a speech to the U.N. General Assembly, in which you vehemently disputed the pessimistic projections of the climate researchers. What was the reaction?

A: I received only polite applause in the immediate aftermath. Later, though, lots of heads of state and government leaders spoke to me, in the hall, at dinner time, at the reception with Bush, at the general secretaries, also the Czech consul. They said: Thank you for so precisely expressing it that way. I share your opinion. Finally someone has said something.

Q: In your book, you compare two market-hostile ideologies. Back then, socialist, and environmentalism today, dominated by the climate question. Forty years ago, during the time of the Prague Spring, there emerged from this city a decisive impulse for conquering socialism. Are you now assuming a new Prague Spring, in a sense a climate spring?

A: I don’t want to be that optimistic. But it does seem like there are a few things coming into motion. People are becoming more thoughtful. A small turning point might well have been the Nobel Prize for the ideologue and propagandist Al Gore. If the Nobel Committee really wanted to help the climate alarmists, they didn’t do them a favor. As an economist, I recognize the law of diminishing returns. If you continue to invest in the one and same project, it begins to produce smaller returns. That’s what happening now with the same warnings against climate change, on and on and on.

Q: A judge has ruled that Al Gore’s movie may only be shown in British schools if the teacher talks about the criticisms of the film. Will the movie also be shown in Czech schools?

A: I hope note.

Q: What does the Czech public think about this individual climate engagement of their president?

A: There aren’t any public opinion surveys out there. On one side, the people in our country are subject to the same propaganda machine as the public elsewhere in the world. On the other hand, I regard the Czechs as pragmatic; they don’t believe in these great intellectual constructs.

Q: Because of their experience with socialism?

A: Most certainty.

Q: Do you have allies in your government?

A: I’m convinced that Martin Riman, minister for industry and trade, thinks as I do. Alexnader Vondra, deputy minister president, is not far from my point of view; the head of government Mirek Topolanek likewise. However, he leads a coalition government and must for that reason adoption a compromise position.

Q: Is there a role in the Czech debate about climate, that again the most radical ideas are coming from Germany?

A: We’re not having that debate here.

Q: You warn that climate protection can put the brakes on economic growth. The climate advocates respond their new technologies will crank up growth.

A: That’s a transparent argument of the lobbyists, who have invested in new technologies and alternative energy. They want us to buy it – which is at the same time highly subsidized.

Q: In your book, you characterized the climate as something along the lines of a new religion.

A: I welcome it when people protect the environment, that too is necessary for life. But this absolutism, this fundamentalism, yes, this essentially religious view that dominate the debate – all of this puts the earth ahead of mankind, and I can’t accept that.

The interview was conducted by Ulli Kulke.

German original:

23. November 2007, 04:00 Uhr
“Klimaschutz ist der neue Sozialismus”
Václav Klaus über die Auswüchse einer fundamentalistischen Umweltpolitik
DIE WELT:Deutschlands Umweltschützer lieben ein geflügeltes Wort: “Wir haben die Erde nur von unseren Kindern geliehen.” Gemeint ist damit: Wir müssen sie an folgende Generationen genau so weitergeben, wie wir sie übernommen haben.Das kann ich überhaupt nicht akzeptieren. Natürlich müssen wir mit der Umwelt äußerst vorsichtig umgehen. Aber die Devise, nach der nur die Erde wichtig ist und der Mensch nicht, ist unerträglich. Wir müssen doch auf und von der Erde leben. Und: Ohne Menschen hat die Erde keinen Sinn und keinen Wert, aber da sind wir fast schon bei religiösen Fragestellungen.Haben Sie Kinder, an die Sie die Erde im Zweifel zurückgeben könnten?Ich habe Kinder und Enkel.Was glauben Sie, wie werden die später, etwa in 20, 30 Jahren über die heutige Debatte zur Klimaerwärmung reden?Ich vermute, dass die nachfolgenden Generationen von dieser Debatte in 30 Jahren gar nichts mehr wissen werden. Und wenn doch, so dürften sie über die heutige Weltuntergangsstimmung lachen und sich fragen: Wie war das damals möglich, dass die Leute im Jahr 2007 so kuriose Dinge dachten und so komisch reagierten?Fragen wir gleich heute: Wie ist es denn möglich?Vielleicht können uns Soziologen und andere Gesellschaftswissenschaftler mal Auskunft darüber geben. Die Phänomene und Mechanismen sind allerdings auch nicht neu. Die Umweltdebatte und das Predigen vom Verzicht und von einem anderen Lebensstil – darüber sprechen wir seit den 60er- und 70er-Jahren. Der Club of Rome machte uns damals schon Angst mit Grafiken und Tabellen.Die Debatte ist nicht neu, aber die Fronten haben sich verschoben. Selbst US-Präsident George Bush gibt sich inzwischen vom Klimawandel überzeugt und folgt Angela Merkel beim Klimaschutz.Es ist nicht meine Aufgabe, die Debatte zwischen diesen beiden Politikern zu analysieren. Aber ich habe dieses Jahr mehrfach mit Bush gesprochen und habe meine Zweifel, dass er seine Meinung geändert hat. Er ist ein Politiker, und auch er muss mit der Öffentlichkeit spielen, auf sie reagieren.Im September hielten Sie eine Rede vor der UN-Vollversammlung, in der Sie den pessimistischen Voraussagen der Klimaforscher vehement widersprachen. Wie waren die Reaktionen?Unmittelbar bekam ich nur höflichen Beifall. Später aber sprachen mich viele Staats- und Regierungschefs an, auf dem Flur, während des Abendessens, bei den Empfängen bei Bush, beim Generalsekretär, auch bei der tschechischen Vertretung. Sie sagten: Vielen Dank, dass Sie das genau so ausgedrückt haben, ich teile Ihre Meinung. Endlich hat es mal jemand gesagt.In Ihrem Buch vergleichen Sie zwei marktfeindliche Ideologien. Den Sozialismus damals und den Environmentalismus heute, dominiert von der Klimafrage. Vor 40 Jahren, beim Prager Frühling, gingen aus dieser Stadt entscheidende Impulse aus zur Überwindung des Sozialismus. Geht jetzt von Ihnen ein neuer Prager Frühling aus, quasi für ein besseres Klima?Ich will nicht zu optimistisch sein. Aber es scheint zurzeit doch einiges in Bewegung zu kommen. Die Menschen werden nachdenklich. Ein kleiner Wendepunkt war womöglich der Nobelpreis für den Ideologen und Propagandisten Al Gore. Wenn das Nobel-Komitee den Klimawarnern helfen wollte, so hat es ihnen damit keinen Gefallen getan. Das fanden viele nicht mehr seriös, da wurde der Rubikon überschritten. Als Wirtschaftswissenschaftler kenne ich im Übrigen auch das Gesetz vom abnehmenden Grenzertrag. Investieren Sie immer weiter in ein und dasselbe Projekt, so nimmt der jeweils zusätzliche Ertrag ab. So geschieht es auch mit den ewig gleichen Mahnungen wegen des Klimawandels.Der Film von Al Gore darf in britischen Schulen laut Gerichtsbeschluss nur noch gezeigt werden, wenn der Lehrer vorher auf die Kritik am Film hingewiesen hat. Wird der Film auch an tschechischen Schulen gezeigt?Ich hoffe nicht.Wie denkt denn die tschechische Öffentlichkeit über das eigenwillige Klima-Engagement ihres Präsidenten?Dazu gibt es keine Umfragen. Einerseits sind die Menschen in unserem Land demselben Propagandaapparat ausgesetzt wie die übrige Weltöffentlichkeit. Andererseits schätze ich die Tschechen als pragmatisch ein, sie glauben nicht an die großen Ideengebäude.Aus den Erfahrungen mit dem Sozialismus heraus?Ganz bestimmt.Haben Sie Verbündete in Ihrer Regierung?Ich bin überzeugt, dass Martin Ríman, Minister für Industrie und Handel, so denkt wie ich. Alexander Vondra, stellvertretender Ministerpräsident, ist von meinen Auffassungen nicht weit entfernt, der Regierungschef Mirek Topolánek ebenso. Er leitet aber eine Koalitionsregierung und muss deshalb Kompromisspositionen einnehmen.Spielt es in der tschechischen Klimadebatte eine Rolle, dass mal wieder aus Deutschland die radikalsten Ideen kommen?Solche Debatten führen wir hier nicht.Sie warnen davor, dass der Klimaschutz das Wachstum bremsen könne. Die Klimaschützer selbst halten dagegen, sie würden mit ihren neuen Technologien das Wachstum ankurbeln.Das ist ein durchschaubares Argument der Lobbyisten, die in die neuen Technologien und Energieformen investiert haben. Sie wollen uns die ja verkaufen – wobei sie im Übrigen auch teuer subventioniert werden.In Ihrem Buch rücken Sie den Klimadiskurs in die Nähe einer neuen Religion.Ich begrüße es, wenn Menschen die Umwelt schützen, auch das ist lebensnotwendig. Aber der Absolutismus, der Fundamentalismus, ja, auch der religiöse Ansatz, der die Debatte beherrscht – all dies stellt die Erde vor den Menschen, und das kann ich nicht akzeptieren.Das Gespräch führte Ulli Kulke

Join the discussion One Comment

  • seguros says:

    The Kyoto Protocol: The U.S. versus the World?

    Using a variety of public opinion polls over a number of years and from a number of countries this paper revisits the questions of crossnational public concern for global warming first examined over a decade ago. Although the scientific community today speaks out on global climatic change in essentially a unified voice concerning its anthropogenic causes and potential devastating impacts at the global level, it remains the case that many citizens of a number of nations still seem to harbor considerable uncertainties about the problem itself. Although it could be argued that there has been a slight improvement over the last decade in the public’s understanding regarding the anthropogenic causes of global warming, the people of all the nations studied remain largely uniformed about the problem. In a recent international study on knowledge about global warming, the citizens of Mexico led all fifteen countries surveyed in 2001 with just twenty-six percent of the survey respondents correctly identifying burning fossil fuels as the primary cause of global warming. The citizens of the U.S., among the most educated in the world, where somewhere in the middle of the pack, tied with the citizens of Brazil at fifteen percent, but slightly lower than Cubans. In response to President Bush’s withdrawal of the Kyoto Protocol in 1991, the U.S. public appears to be far more supportive of the action than the citizens of a number of European countries where there was considerable outrage about the decision.

    Carlos Menendez
    http://www.segurosmagazine.es

Leave a Reply