The Energy Bill Turns Bad

By June 21, 2007Energy

H.R. 6, the energy bill now under debate in the U.S. Senate, has turned into a very bad piece of legislation, dirigisme at its worst. The bill shows little recognition of the importance of market forces or the need to expand domestic energy supply. Accordingly, the NAM issued a “Key Vote” letter today opposing the bill. An excerpt:

The NAM and our member companies have worked hard to improve the energy legislation that came to the floor last week. Unfortunately, we believe the legislation has progressively worsened and is now beyond repair. We oppose the Reid substitute for the following reasons:

  • It does virtually nothing to address our nation’s energy supply needs.
  • It includes price controls/gouging schemes that interfere with normal market forces in addressing supply and demand imbalances.
  • Its Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards are unworkable and technologically infeasible.
  • It’s one of our longer letters of the sort, representing the energy issue’s critical importance to manufacturers. The NAM wants a good bill, and we’re eager to work with members of Congress to achieve that aim. Unfortunately, right now the best way to accomplish that goal is to get rid of H.R. 6.

    Join the discussion One Comment

    • Don Pickard says:

      It does virtually nothing to address our nation’s energy supply needs.

      Agreed.

      Its Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards are unworkable and technologically infeasible.

      Disagree. American auto manufacturing is going to be out of business within a few years at this rate, and they seem to be doing everything that they can to avoid modernizing the technology, which is the one thing that might save them.

      Ok, so they’ll fight tooth and nail to avoid having Government push them towards energy efficiency, which would be fine if they got their own act together. This doesn’t, however, appear to be happening.

      Does anyone really think that we’re going to be able to export gas guzzlers to the developing world (tomorrows growing market)? No way are those people going to buy a car that costs so much to drive, they don’t have money coming out their ears like Americans, and even Americans are increasingly going to buy efficient imports as time goes on.

      Rather than step up the the challenge, the American car is doing nothing but saying “we can’t,” which is not the attitude that made America Great, and it’s going to crush the manufacturers before too long at this rate.

      Thanks

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